Adobe Gamma Question

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Taisun, Oct 17, 2003.

  1. Taisun

    Taisun Guest

    Hi,

    I've made my first attempt in calibrating my monitor using Adobe Gamma.
    During the process, i've been asked to set the contrast to 100% and adjust
    the brightness.
    My question is, after going through the complete process, am i supposed to
    leave the contrast setting at 100%? It seems that the monitor is way too
    bright and is very uneasy for my eyes....

    Thanks
     
    Taisun, Oct 17, 2003
    #1
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  2. Taisun

    o\(*¿*\)o Guest

    I printed a picture, then matched it up by adjusting my brightness. I did
    leave the contrast at 100%. By lowering the brightness to match the picture
    i didnt even think about adjusting the contrast back down some. Whether
    thats right or not it worked for me.

    "Taisun" <> wrote in message
    news:bmnsgo$fbc$...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I've made my first attempt in calibrating my monitor using Adobe Gamma.
    > During the process, i've been asked to set the contrast to 100% and adjust
    > the brightness.
    > My question is, after going through the complete process, am i supposed to
    > leave the contrast setting at 100%? It seems that the monitor is way too
    > bright and is very uneasy for my eyes....
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    >
     
    o\(*¿*\)o, Oct 17, 2003
    #2
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  3. Taisun

    o\(*¿*\)o Guest

    A nice site also http://www.normankoren.com/ hope this helps.

    "Taisun" <> wrote in message
    news:bmnsgo$fbc$...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I've made my first attempt in calibrating my monitor using Adobe Gamma.
    > During the process, i've been asked to set the contrast to 100% and adjust
    > the brightness.
    > My question is, after going through the complete process, am i supposed to
    > leave the contrast setting at 100%? It seems that the monitor is way too
    > bright and is very uneasy for my eyes....
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    >
     
    o\(*¿*\)o, Oct 17, 2003
    #3
  4. Taisun

    Tony Spadaro Guest

    Frasier and Blatner, in the book "Real World Photoshop" recommend setting
    the contrast to a comfortable level for your eyes before running Adobe
    Gamma. I concur. Full contrast is hard on the eyes and hard on the monitor -
    I don't have the foggiest why Adobe says turn it up all the way.
    They also recommend setting the monitor for 6500k rather than 5000k. I
    have always felt 5000k was too yellow for a monitor and they not only agree
    but have a theory that it has something to do with the way phosphors work on
    a CRT.

    --
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com
    home of The Camera-ist's Manifesto
    The Improved Links Pages are at
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/links/mlinks00.html
    A sample chapter from my novel "Haight-Ashbury" is at
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/writ/hait/hatitl.html
    "Taisun" <> wrote in message
    news:bmnsgo$fbc$...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I've made my first attempt in calibrating my monitor using Adobe Gamma.
    > During the process, i've been asked to set the contrast to 100% and adjust
    > the brightness.
    > My question is, after going through the complete process, am i supposed to
    > leave the contrast setting at 100%? It seems that the monitor is way too
    > bright and is very uneasy for my eyes....
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    >
     
    Tony Spadaro, Oct 17, 2003
    #4
  5. Taisun

    Taisun Guest

    Yes, I've set my monitor to a colour temperature of 6500k. I'll follow your
    advice and give it a try. Working with a 100% contrast is too much for my
    eyes....


    "Tony Spadaro" <> wrote in message
    news:nXKjb.17917$...
    > Frasier and Blatner, in the book "Real World Photoshop" recommend

    setting
    > the contrast to a comfortable level for your eyes before running Adobe
    > Gamma. I concur. Full contrast is hard on the eyes and hard on the

    monitor -
    > I don't have the foggiest why Adobe says turn it up all the way.
    > They also recommend setting the monitor for 6500k rather than 5000k. I
    > have always felt 5000k was too yellow for a monitor and they not only

    agree
    > but have a theory that it has something to do with the way phosphors work

    on
    > a CRT.
    >
    > --
    > http://www.chapelhillnoir.com
    > home of The Camera-ist's Manifesto
    > The Improved Links Pages are at
    > http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/links/mlinks00.html
    > A sample chapter from my novel "Haight-Ashbury" is at
    > http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/writ/hait/hatitl.html
    > "Taisun" <> wrote in message
    > news:bmnsgo$fbc$...
    > > Hi,
    > >
    > > I've made my first attempt in calibrating my monitor using Adobe Gamma.
    > > During the process, i've been asked to set the contrast to 100% and

    adjust
    > > the brightness.
    > > My question is, after going through the complete process, am i supposed

    to
    > > leave the contrast setting at 100%? It seems that the monitor is way too
    > > bright and is very uneasy for my eyes....
    > >
    > > Thanks
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    Taisun, Oct 17, 2003
    #5
  6. Taisun

    Rick Guest

    For some reason Adobe thinks all monitors have the same contrast
    capabilities, which is absolute nonsense. Adjust the contrast to as
    high a level as possible without causing blooming, ghosting or other
    problems, or eye discomfort. Then follow this procedure:
    http://www.computer-darkroom.com/ps7-colour/ps7_1.htm

    Note this procedure also tells you to set contrast to maximum.
    Just ignore that and set it as explained above.

    Rick

    "Taisun" <> wrote in message news:bmnu6a$fnq$...
    > Yes, I've set my monitor to a colour temperature of 6500k. I'll follow your
    > advice and give it a try. Working with a 100% contrast is too much for my
    > eyes....
    >
    >
    > "Tony Spadaro" <> wrote in message
    > news:nXKjb.17917$...
    > > Frasier and Blatner, in the book "Real World Photoshop" recommend

    > setting
    > > the contrast to a comfortable level for your eyes before running Adobe
    > > Gamma. I concur. Full contrast is hard on the eyes and hard on the

    > monitor -
    > > I don't have the foggiest why Adobe says turn it up all the way.
    > > They also recommend setting the monitor for 6500k rather than 5000k. I
    > > have always felt 5000k was too yellow for a monitor and they not only

    > agree
    > > but have a theory that it has something to do with the way phosphors work

    > on
    > > a CRT.
    > >
    > > --
    > > http://www.chapelhillnoir.com
    > > home of The Camera-ist's Manifesto
    > > The Improved Links Pages are at
    > > http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/links/mlinks00.html
    > > A sample chapter from my novel "Haight-Ashbury" is at
    > > http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/writ/hait/hatitl.html
    > > "Taisun" <> wrote in message
    > > news:bmnsgo$fbc$...
    > > > Hi,
    > > >
    > > > I've made my first attempt in calibrating my monitor using Adobe Gamma.
    > > > During the process, i've been asked to set the contrast to 100% and

    > adjust
    > > > the brightness.
    > > > My question is, after going through the complete process, am i supposed

    > to
    > > > leave the contrast setting at 100%? It seems that the monitor is way too
    > > > bright and is very uneasy for my eyes....
    > > >
    > > > Thanks
    > > >
    > > >

    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    Rick, Oct 17, 2003
    #6
  7. Taisun

    Alan F Cross Guest

    In message <bmo6c5$k2g4l$-berlin.de>, Rick
    <> writes
    >For some reason Adobe thinks all monitors have the same contrast
    >capabilities, which is absolute nonsense. Adjust the contrast to as
    >high a level as possible without causing blooming, ghosting or other
    >problems, or eye discomfort. Then follow this procedure:
    >http://www.computer-darkroom.com/ps7-colour/ps7_1.htm
    >
    >Note this procedure also tells you to set contrast to maximum. Just
    >ignore that and set it as explained above.
    >
    >Rick


    When you use the Spyder for screen calibration, they recommend a light
    output reading well below that of maximum contrast, and advise you to
    turn down the contrast till the device reads something below 90 (can't
    remember the units). They reckon profiling is difficult at top contrast,
    and things get a bit non-linear.
    --
    Alan F Cross
     
    Alan F Cross, Oct 17, 2003
    #7
  8. Taisun

    Tony Spadaro Guest

    I would agree with them on that. I think Adobe simply goofed on that part.

    --
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com
    home of The Camera-ist's Manifesto
    The Improved Links Pages are at
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/links/mlinks00.html
    A sample chapter from my novel "Haight-Ashbury" is at
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/writ/hait/hatitl.html
    "Alan F Cross" <> wrote in message
    news:hRI3jlBPo6j$...
    > In message <bmo6c5$k2g4l$-berlin.de>, Rick
    > <> writes
    > >For some reason Adobe thinks all monitors have the same contrast
    > >capabilities, which is absolute nonsense. Adjust the contrast to as
    > >high a level as possible without causing blooming, ghosting or other
    > >problems, or eye discomfort. Then follow this procedure:
    > >http://www.computer-darkroom.com/ps7-colour/ps7_1.htm
    > >
    > >Note this procedure also tells you to set contrast to maximum. Just
    > >ignore that and set it as explained above.
    > >
    > >Rick

    >
    > When you use the Spyder for screen calibration, they recommend a light
    > output reading well below that of maximum contrast, and advise you to
    > turn down the contrast till the device reads something below 90 (can't
    > remember the units). They reckon profiling is difficult at top contrast,
    > and things get a bit non-linear.
    > --
    > Alan F Cross
     
    Tony Spadaro, Oct 17, 2003
    #8
  9. Taisun

    Bob Niland Guest

    > Taisun <> wrote:

    > I've made my first attempt in calibrating
    > my monitor using Adobe Gamma.


    Adobe Gamma is a joke.

    > ... i've been asked to set the contrast to
    > 100% and adjust the brightness.


    Any calibration instructions that don't tell
    you what those two controls actually do
    (black level and white level) has abandoned
    any pretense at credibility.

    > ... am i supposed to leave the contrast
    > setting at 100%?


    That usually guarantees that your displayed
    tonal range will be highly non-linear, and
    that either shadow or hilite detail will be
    crushed, the other fatal problem with Adobe
    Gamma.

    There is far more useful advice on the
    matter. Here's an example:
    http://www.poynton.com/notes/brightness_and_contrast/

    --
    Regards, PO Box 248
    Bob Niland Enterprise
    mailto: Kansas USA
    which, due to spam, is: 67441-0248
    email4rjn AT yahoo DOT com
    http://www.access-one.com/rjn

    Unless otherwise specifically stated, expressing
    personal opinions and NOT speaking for any
    employer, client or Internet Service Provider.
     
    Bob Niland, Oct 17, 2003
    #9
  10. Taisun

    Mike Engles Guest

    o(*¿*)o wrote:
    >
    > I printed a picture, then matched it up by adjusting my brightness. I did
    > leave the contrast at 100%. By lowering the brightness to match the picture
    > i didnt even think about adjusting the contrast back down some. Whether
    > thats right or not it worked for me.
    >
    > "Taisun" <> wrote in message
    > news:bmnsgo$fbc$...
    > > Hi,
    > >
    > > I've made my first attempt in calibrating my monitor using Adobe Gamma.
    > > During the process, i've been asked to set the contrast to 100% and adjust
    > > the brightness.
    > > My question is, after going through the complete process, am i supposed to
    > > leave the contrast setting at 100%? It seems that the monitor is way too
    > > bright and is very uneasy for my eyes....
    > >
    > > Thanks
    > >
    > >


    Hello

    Making the contrast full ensures that you have a maximum visual White
    point. Run Adobe Gamma. Now you need to set the Black point.
    Make a small image and divide it into three. Fill the outer bands with
    Black 0,0.0 and the center with 1,1,1,

    Save this as your desktop image. Adjust your brightness full and then
    slowly reduce, till you can just seperate the 0,0,0 from 1,1,1.
    This is quite difficult but can be done. If you cannot do it make 1,1,1
    3,3,3 or 4,4,4.
    You should now have set a visual Black point.

    Mike Engles
     
    Mike Engles, Oct 18, 2003
    #10
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