Adding wireless capability to simplest wired configuration

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by Ron, Feb 16, 2009.

  1. Ron

    Ron Guest

    A very simple question (I think). We have a wired Linksys router connected
    to the cable modem. Each of two computers (upstairs & downstairs) are
    cabled to the router for the sole purpose of accessing the internet. Each
    uses a software firewall. I'd like to expand (exchange?) the router so that
    we have a wireless connection in the house for the sole purpose of
    permitting a smart phone to have net access. I'd like to do this without
    exposing the existing desktops to the wireless component - ie. keep them
    totally hard wired and secure from wireless intrusion.

    In other words, I want to add wireless capability to the existing household
    broadband subscription, while keeping the desktops 100% insulated from it.
    Would appreciate suggestions on the proper way to do this.

    Many thanks. Apologies for the total noobidity.

    -Ron
     
    Ron, Feb 16, 2009
    #1
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  2. Ron

    Gordon Guest

    "Ron" <> wrote in message
    news:gnbqga$sib$...
    >A very simple question (I think). We have a wired Linksys router connected
    >to the cable modem. Each of two computers (upstairs & downstairs) are
    >cabled to the router for the sole purpose of accessing the internet. Each
    >uses a software firewall. I'd like to expand (exchange?) the router so
    >that we have a wireless connection in the house for the sole purpose of
    >permitting a smart phone to have net access. I'd like to do this without
    >exposing the existing desktops to the wireless component - ie. keep them
    >totally hard wired and secure from wireless intrusion.
    >
    > In other words, I want to add wireless capability to the existing
    > household broadband subscription, while keeping the desktops 100%
    > insulated from it. Would appreciate suggestions on the proper way to do
    > this.
    >
    > Many thanks. Apologies for the total noobidity.
    >
    > -Ron



    The way I have done it in my house is to buy a multi-port switch and a
    Wireless Access Point. (WAP). Connect the computers and the router (I have
    to use the router supplied by the company my wife works for...) and the WAP
    to the switch by cables.
    Or, just replace the router with a wireless-enabled router.

    --
    Asking a question?
    Please tell us the version of the application you are asking about,
    your OS, Service Pack level
    and the FULL contents of any error message(s)
     
    Gordon, Feb 16, 2009
    #2
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  3. Ron

    Big_Al Guest

    Ron said this on 2/16/2009 8:42 AM:
    > A very simple question (I think). We have a wired Linksys router
    > connected to the cable modem. Each of two computers (upstairs &
    > downstairs) are cabled to the router for the sole purpose of accessing
    > the internet. Each uses a software firewall. I'd like to expand
    > (exchange?) the router so that we have a wireless connection in the
    > house for the sole purpose of permitting a smart phone to have net
    > access. I'd like to do this without exposing the existing desktops to
    > the wireless component - ie. keep them totally hard wired and secure
    > from wireless intrusion.
    >
    > In other words, I want to add wireless capability to the existing
    > household broadband subscription, while keeping the desktops 100%
    > insulated from it. Would appreciate suggestions on the proper way to do
    > this.
    >
    > Many thanks. Apologies for the total noobidity.
    >
    > -Ron

    Just replace the old router with a wireless one.
    Keep the 2 pc's wired.
    You now have wireless add-on.

    Finding a Wireless Access Point (WAP) is a bit harder, they are not as
    common as simple wireless routers, but if you found one, you could just
    add it as another hardwired device and it provides the wireless service.
    Note: Some wireless routers, Belkin F5D7230-4 for one, have the ability
    to become a WAP with a setting on the internal menu. But its hard to
    find that tidbit of info from specs though. And some wireless routers
    can have the config changed enough to make it work like a WAP. I have
    3 routers and only 2 of the 3 were capable of doing or simulating a WAP.

    Unless you are in love with your current router, change it.
    I have verizon service and they provide a wireless router that is
    specific to their service (or so they say, I've not played with changing
    it). But when I wanted a WPA2 wireless that they don't support, I
    started looking at other routers and ran into all this WAP stuff.
    Finally got a friends Belkin (above) and it worked great. I basically
    now had two wireless radios and could use either one. One WPA2 and one
    WPA (which I didn't want and turned off software wise).

    Good luck.
     
    Big_Al, Feb 16, 2009
    #3
  4. HI
    As mentione4d above the best cost effective solution is to add a Wireless
    Router configures as an Access Point
    Here how - Using a Wireless Router as a switch with an Access Point -
    http://www.ezlan.net/router_AP.html
    Example for a reasonably priced good Wireless Router, Asus WL-520GU
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833320023
    Jack (MS, MVP-Networking)

    "Ron" <> wrote in message
    news:gnbqga$sib$...
    >A very simple question (I think). We have a wired Linksys router connected
    >to the cable modem. Each of two computers (upstairs & downstairs) are
    >cabled to the router for the sole purpose of accessing the internet. Each
    >uses a software firewall. I'd like to expand (exchange?) the router so
    >that we have a wireless connection in the house for the sole purpose of
    >permitting a smart phone to have net access. I'd like to do this without
    >exposing the existing desktops to the wireless component - ie. keep them
    >totally hard wired and secure from wireless intrusion.
    >
    > In other words, I want to add wireless capability to the existing
    > household broadband subscription, while keeping the desktops 100%
    > insulated from it. Would appreciate suggestions on the proper way to do
    > this.
    >
    > Many thanks. Apologies for the total noobidity.
    >
    > -Ron
     
    Jack \(MVP-Networking\)., Feb 16, 2009
    #4
  5. Ron

    Big_Al Guest

    Jack (MVP-Networking). said this on 2/16/2009 11:11 AM:
    > HI
    > As mentione4d above the best cost effective solution is to add a
    > Wireless Router configures as an Access Point
    > Here how - Using a Wireless Router as a switch with an Access Point -
    > http://www.ezlan.net/router_AP.html
    > Example for a reasonably priced good Wireless Router, Asus WL-520GU
    > http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833320023
    > Jack (MS, MVP-Networking)
    >
    > "Ron" <> wrote in message
    > news:gnbqga$sib$...
    >> A very simple question (I think). We have a wired Linksys router
    >> connected to the cable modem. Each of two computers (upstairs &
    >> downstairs) are cabled to the router for the sole purpose of accessing
    >> the internet. Each uses a software firewall. I'd like to expand
    >> (exchange?) the router so that we have a wireless connection in the
    >> house for the sole purpose of permitting a smart phone to have net
    >> access. I'd like to do this without exposing the existing desktops to
    >> the wireless component - ie. keep them totally hard wired and secure
    >> from wireless intrusion.
    >>
    >> In other words, I want to add wireless capability to the existing
    >> household broadband subscription, while keeping the desktops 100%
    >> insulated from it. Would appreciate suggestions on the proper way to
    >> do this.
    >>
    >> Many thanks. Apologies for the total noobidity.
    >>
    >> -Ron

    >

    And they even have a $10 rebate going on. :)
     
    Big_Al, Feb 16, 2009
    #5
  6. Ron

    Ron Guest

    > Just replace the old router with a wireless one.
    > Keep the 2 pc's wired.
    > You now have wireless add-on.


    That seems simple enough. I didn't realize that "wireless" routers actually
    have ethernet ports. So I can configure it to completely insulate the
    cabled computers from any wireless probe, right? (Sorry for the
    Google-laziness. Will do my research now.)

    Thanks all - for the responses and the links. -Ron (the OP)
     
    Ron, Feb 16, 2009
    #6
  7. Ron

    Big_Al Guest

    Ron said this on 2/16/2009 5:38 PM:
    >> Just replace the old router with a wireless one.
    >> Keep the 2 pc's wired.
    >> You now have wireless add-on.

    >
    > That seems simple enough. I didn't realize that "wireless" routers
    > actually have ethernet ports. So I can configure it to completely
    > insulate the cabled computers from any wireless probe, right? (Sorry
    > for the Google-laziness. Will do my research now.)
    >
    > Thanks all - for the responses and the links. -Ron (the OP)


    I'm going out on a limb but since Ethernet and Wireless both connect to
    the same router, are they 'insulated'? Well that's a good question.
    So a hacker gets into your wireless, well, he's into your network now,
    be it wireless or wired. That's why you put up firewalls on all the
    PC's I guess.

    And yes, most of the simple wireless routers on the market are a 4 port
    LAN wired, with wireless, and 1 WAN connection (the cable modem etc).
     
    Big_Al, Feb 17, 2009
    #7
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