Addicted to technology

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by sarah, Feb 15, 2004.

  1. sarah

    sarah Guest

    We may panic if we miss a phone call; we invigorate our day with an
    email check; losing data can cause great anxiety...

    I'm currently conducting a design research experiment - I'm trying to
    become a technology addict through excessive use of internet,
    email,tv, phone use, etc. I appreciate that this may sound irrational
    and careless to some, however I'm interested in exploring at first
    hand the nature of dependence on Information and Communication
    Technologies.

    If you feel that you are currently dependent on technologies (such as
    the internet, mobile phones, chat rooms, email), if you have overcome
    your technology  'addiction', or are just interested in this topic,
    I'd like to hear your advice or story.

    These stories may eventually be used in an academic paper or article,
    however all participants will remain anonymous.

    Sarah
    sarah, Feb 15, 2004
    #1
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  2. sarah

    Chet Guest

    I am "addicted" to technology in much the same way that I am addicted to
    clothing or automobiles. I could do without but why would I want to? I
    don't know of any ill effects from my use of computer, TV, phone, etc.

    I went to work for a computer company upon graduation from college in 1963
    and have pretty much grown up with the industry. I was delighted when
    computers came along that I could afford to own and bought a '286 with 1.6
    MB ram and 20 MB hard drive for around $1,400.

    My family has always had telephones. In the 1950s my father worked out of
    town a lot and we looked forward to the regular calls from wherever he was.
    Of course he didn't have wireless phones back then so the calls were usually
    in the evening after a day of work or travel. Again, we weren't addicted,
    we just used the available technology to enhance our pleasure. At the same
    time, I was in Boy Scouts and learned Morse code and semaphore flags, not
    because there was anything wrong with the electronic technology.

    While we're at it, how about the microwave oven. I enjoy a backyard cookout
    or hot dogs on the beach but I also use the new technology when it can do
    the job.

    The computer, attached to the internet at 1.5 mbps provides many hours of
    entertainment and also is my primary source for news and weather
    information, banking, investments and does a nice job of figuring my taxes.
    All of which I could do in other ways.

    If this is addiction, don't bother to send me to rehab. I prefer to remain
    in denial.
    Chet, Feb 15, 2004
    #2
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  3. sarah

    sarah Guest

    Thanks for your response, which is very interesting to me. I've had a
    similar experience of growing up with technology around that is both
    useful and engaging, and now I work in the field of interaction
    design, so I too use technology everyday without guilt or addiction -
    it's my job.

    A lot of literature I've read around internet and mobile phone use,
    uses the language of addiction - for example, checking your email to
    "kickstart" your day. I find this fascinating, and I believe it is a
    design space. My research experiment to expand this space is to
    overconnect with technology, after which I'll completely disconnect.
    I've been tracking my use for about a week now. Although I wouldn't
    say I'm addicted I have definately experienced an over-use of the
    internet, web cams and chat, and, to be honest, I'm looking forward to
    some time off-line.

    "Chet" <> wrote in message news:<njLXb.322466$na.475150@attbi_s04>...
    > I am "addicted" to technology in much the same way that I am addicted to
    > clothing or automobiles. I could do without but why would I want to? I
    > don't know of any ill effects from my use of computer, TV, phone, etc.
    >
    > I went to work for a computer company upon graduation from college in 1963
    > and have pretty much grown up with the industry. I was delighted when
    > computers came along that I could afford to own and bought a '286 with 1.6
    > MB ram and 20 MB hard drive for around $1,400.
    >
    > My family has always had telephones. In the 1950s my father worked out of
    > town a lot and we looked forward to the regular calls from wherever he was.
    > Of course he didn't have wireless phones back then so the calls were usually
    > in the evening after a day of work or travel. Again, we weren't addicted,
    > we just used the available technology to enhance our pleasure. At the same
    > time, I was in Boy Scouts and learned Morse code and semaphore flags, not
    > because there was anything wrong with the electronic technology.
    >
    > While we're at it, how about the microwave oven. I enjoy a backyard cookout
    > or hot dogs on the beach but I also use the new technology when it can do
    > the job.
    >
    > The computer, attached to the internet at 1.5 mbps provides many hours of
    > entertainment and also is my primary source for news and weather
    > information, banking, investments and does a nice job of figuring my taxes.
    > All of which I could do in other ways.
    >
    > If this is addiction, don't bother to send me to rehab. I prefer to remain
    > in denial.
    sarah, Feb 16, 2004
    #3
  4. sarah

    Drifter Guest

    >Thanks for your response, which is very interesting to me. I've had a
    >similar experience of growing up with technology around that is both
    >useful and engaging, and now I work in the field of interaction
    >design, so I too use technology everyday without guilt or addiction -
    >it's my job.
    >
    >A lot of literature I've read around internet and mobile phone use,
    >uses the language of addiction - for example, checking your email to
    >"kickstart" your day. I find this fascinating, and I believe it is a
    >design space. My research experiment to expand this space is to
    >overconnect with technology, after which I'll completely disconnect.
    >I've been tracking my use for about a week now. Although I wouldn't
    >say I'm addicted I have definately experienced an over-use of the
    >internet, web cams and chat, and, to be honest, I'm looking forward to
    >some time off-line.

    Most "pop culture" articles on addiction, especially on silliness like
    "internet addiction", start out with a story about how John or Jane
    spends so much time on the internet that they lost their job, friends,
    marriage, etc. And then proceeds to address/blame the symptom
    (Internet use) but never attempts to find the root cause of what's
    wrong with John or Jane.

    Something that creates a biochemical dependence (certain drugs for
    example) is a completely different animal. But when people start
    going on about "internet addiction" or "technology addiction" It
    causes me to wonder what is actually wrong with those "addicts".

    Drifter
    Drifter, Feb 16, 2004
    #4
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