Abstract paintings of Will Dockery

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Will Dockery, Feb 6, 2009.

  1. Will Dockery

    Will Dockery Guest

    I've posted a new gallery of some of my recent abstract paintings, which
    some of you may have an interest in checking out, for whichever reasons you
    prefer.

    These paintings are made with a variety of materials from oil, watercolor
    and pastel paints, to housepaint, solvents and melted plastics:

    http://www.fototime.com/inv/E917106F136751F

    Comments and critique, as with all my work in all forms, is most welcome.

    --
    "Twilight Girl" and other song-poems by Will Dockery:
    http://www.myspace.com/willdockery
    Will Dockery, Feb 6, 2009
    #1
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  2. Will Dockery

    msifg Guest

    "Will Dockery" <> wrote in message
    news:6fc28$498ccd9c$4b4c71e9$...
    > I've posted a new gallery of some of my recent abstract paintings, which
    > some of you may have an interest in checking out, for whichever reasons
    > you
    > prefer.
    >
    > These paintings are made with a variety of materials from oil, watercolor
    > and pastel paints, to housepaint, solvents and melted plastics:
    >
    > http://www.fototime.com/inv/E917106F136751F
    >
    > Comments and critique, as with all my work in all forms, is most welcome.
    >
    > --
    > "Twilight Girl" and other song-poems by Will Dockery:
    > http://www.myspace.com/willdockery
    >
    >



    cool!

    my dad just sent me a bunch of abstract art.

    it's some of my favorite kind of art.

    my dad paints on a regular basis.

    thanks for sharing.

    (sharks beware:
    i've got a new pair of teeth.)
    msifg, Feb 7, 2009
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Re: Abstract paintings of a lazy narcisstic douchebag

    "Will Dockery" <> wrote in message
    news:6fc28$498ccd9c$4b4c71e9$...
    > I've posted a new gallery of some of my recent abstract paintings, which



    mean about as much as a pre-schooler's glitter and glue art.


    > some of you may have an interest in checking out,




    No.





    > for whichever reasons you
    > prefer.
    >
    > These paintings are made with a variety of materials from oil, watercolor
    > and pastel paints, to housepaint, solvents and melted plastics:



    So basically, you accidentally melted something with one of your cigarettes,
    and decided to put the can of Raid under your sink to something other than
    its intended purpose. In the meantime, you probably vomited and after
    scraping away the top layer, in your delusional and stupid mental state
    decided to call the rest "art."


    You're about as much as an artist as a cat walking across a piano is a
    musician.



    >
    > http://www.fototime.com/inv/E917106F136751F
    >
    > Comments and critique, as with all my work in all forms, is most welcome.
    >


    It sucks, your work is worthless and would be better off being used to
    psychologically torture 9/11 conspirators.



    > --
    > "I Might Be a Girl" and other song-poems by Will Dockery:
    > http://www.myspace.com/willdockery
    >
    >
    Orsen Wells w/Citizen Cain, Feb 7, 2009
    #3
  4. Will Dockery

    Will Dockery Guest

    "msifg" <> wrote:
    > "Will Dockery" wrote:
    >
    > I've posted a new gallery of some of my recent abstract paintings, which
    > > some of you may have an interest in checking out, for whichever reasons
    > > you prefer.
    > >
    > > These paintings are made with a variety of materials from oil,

    watercolor
    > > and pastel paints, to housepaint, solvents and melted plastics:
    > >
    > > http://www.fototime.com/inv/E917106F136751F
    > >
    > > Comments and critique, as with all my work in all forms, are most

    welcome.
    >
    > cool!
    >
    > my dad just sent me a bunch of abstract art.
    >
    > it's some of my favorite kind of art.
    >
    > my dad paints on a regular basis.


    Are any of your father's works online anywhere? I'd like to check those out,
    since abstract is by far my favorite form.

    I hope to somedays get some of Sulzbach's work scanned and online, but he's
    such a hermit-type, living out in the wouds of Alabama, it'll be some trick
    getting that done.

    > thanks for sharing.
    >
    > (sharks beware:
    > i've got a new pair of teeth.)


    This unsent post I just found in my "Drafts" section, from last year, of
    another old-time artist friend of mine, you might enjoy, as well:

    Here are galleries of Barfield, my teacher, who has been highly influenced
    by Aborigine art and culture...

    The art of Dan Barfield:

    http://www.danbarfield.com/index.php

    About Dan Barfield posted 2008-01-28 11:22:00 by Dan
    I have often been asked by critics and students for the influences that have
    shaped my "philosophy of art." I rattle off a few well known names and a few
    well known "schools" of art which seems to satisfy them.The truth is....I
    don't have a philosophy of art. My paintings grow out of my philosophy of
    life and from the experiences of the life that I live and have lived since
    childhood.

    I grew up along the east coast between Savannah, Georgia and Jacksonville,
    Florida, when that coast was still wild and undeveloped. School was a prison
    for me, a thing to be endured only long enough to escape into the birdsong
    silence and deep shadows of the woods and river swamps, or the sun washed
    marshes and sea islands of the coast.
    Then, as all teen-agers must, there came a time when I rebelled against this
    life. I left this life behind and went to art school and college. I embraced
    any road, any thought, any philosophy that took me away from that "old life"
    which seemed somehow dull and meaningless. I learned all of the names and
    catch phrases of the intellectual artist, embraced all of the currently
    popular "schools," and lived the life of "artist as rock-and roll star." And
    I did it well, getting my undergraduate degree in art from Columbus State,
    and my Master of Fine Art from Savannah College of art and Design, showing
    in Europe and America,wearing the laurels of success, never allowing myself
    to admit that I was lying to myself and living someone else's life.

    Then a major event in my life took place in which I lost everything. I was
    living in my car with no home, eating at the Saint Francis mission in St.
    Augustine, Florida, and being forced to rethink my life........In retrospect
    it is the best thing that could have happened to me. I returned to the
    beauty and basic truths of my childhood. I again embraced the beaauty of the
    earth and the joy of being alive and free. This is where these paintings are
    born.

    GALLERY ONE posted 2008-01-28 10:29:41 by Dan
    This is my personal favorite series. I have attempted to reach deep into the
    human psyche here and create paintings that will be recognized across all
    cultures and times. To this end I have worked flat with no attempt to make
    them appear as anything except flat paintings on flat surfaces. There is no
    attempt at perspective or depth; often there is no foreground, middleground,
    or background. The colors are vivid and bright, the flora and fauna would
    never be recognized by science, the fruits and flowers would never be found
    in a florist or grocer....I hope that they are universal symbols of that
    which they represent.

    The observer will notice at once the power and importance of the sun symbol.
    Actually the sun was usually the first thing painted and the rest of the
    painting grew up around it. Those who have lived in the tropics will
    understand this, as the sun is the ruler of the day and of all life.

    The ruler of all life ....It has been suggested that the sun is a "god"
    symbol in these paintings, and I am comfortable with that. (Note that I have
    said a 'god symbol,' not a god....a symbol only.) The sun is the source of
    all life as all energy comes from the sun...we are of the sun, we eat the
    sun when we eat vegetables, or the meat that feeds on the vegetation.

    Others have found a "Christian" image in the three "Ancestral Figures" that
    stand guard with spears and huge erections over this fecund paradise.(I have
    to admit that these figures are stolen from Australian rock paintings and
    modified to suit my needs.)

    I think I have said enough about these paintings now. I have a tendency to
    get long winded and I would not want to color your perceptions. And after
    all, art does not take place in the paint or on the wall; art does not take
    place in the mind of the artists;...art takes place in the interaction
    between the viewer and the painting. Art is a different experience for each
    of us, modified or enhanced by our own unique experiences.

    The Dream:
    http://www.danbarfield.com/gallery1.php

    GALLERY TWO posted 2008-01-28 10:04:00 by Dan
    What can one say about these paintings? These are scenes that I have
    stumbled across from the Low Country of South Carolina to the provinces of
    the Philippines. Shrimp boats of the South Carolina and Georgia coast, a
    lighthouse somewhere on the Golden Isles of Georgia; a mother and daughter
    in Costa Rica, two young Filipino girls with the family's carabao...other
    images of other times and places....

    Oil on canvas; simple, but I enjoy the discipline needed to render a sceene
    that exists on the outside of my mind....simple beauty of a simple life.

    I hope that you, the viewer, enjoy them, that you are sensitive to the
    beauty of them, and that they bring you happiness.

    The Reality:
    http://www.danbarfield.com/gallery2.php

    --
    "Wobble":
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UVIF2-qWIUc

    Henry Conley: guitar
    Riley Yielding: trumpet
    Sir Charles: saxophone
    Sam Phillips: bass
    Brad Strickland: drums
    Will Dockery: words

    "Wobble" was written by Will Dockery & Henry Conley

    "Last Dream Today":
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GSpYx8sSFP0

    Brian Mallard - guitar
    Dan Davidson - bass
    Josh Railey - drums
    Riley Yeilding - trumpet
    Sir Charles - saxophone
    Will Dockery - vocals

    "Last Dream Today" was written by Will Dockery and Brian Mallard
    Will Dockery, Feb 7, 2009
    #4
  5. Will Dockery

    msifg Guest

    "Will Dockery" <> wrote in message
    news:c88eb$498d5194$4b4c71e9$...
    >
    > "msifg" <> wrote:
    >> "Will Dockery" wrote:
    >>
    >> I've posted a new gallery of some of my recent abstract paintings, which
    >> > some of you may have an interest in checking out, for whichever reasons
    >> > you prefer.
    >> >
    >> > These paintings are made with a variety of materials from oil,

    > watercolor
    >> > and pastel paints, to housepaint, solvents and melted plastics:
    >> >
    >> > http://www.fototime.com/inv/E917106F136751F
    >> >
    >> > Comments and critique, as with all my work in all forms, are most

    > welcome.
    >>
    >> cool!
    >>
    >> my dad just sent me a bunch of abstract art.
    >>
    >> it's some of my favorite kind of art.
    >>
    >> my dad paints on a regular basis.

    >
    > Are any of your father's works online anywhere? I'd like to check those
    > out,
    > since abstract is by far my favorite form.
    >
    > I hope to somedays get some of Sulzbach's work scanned and online, but
    > he's
    > such a hermit-type, living out in the wouds of Alabama, it'll be some
    > trick
    > getting that done.
    >
    >> thanks for sharing.
    >>
    >> (sharks beware:
    >> i've got a new pair of teeth.)

    >
    > This unsent post I just found in my "Drafts" section, from last year, of
    > another old-time artist friend of mine, you might enjoy, as well:
    >
    > Here are galleries of Barfield, my teacher, who has been highly influenced
    > by Aborigine art and culture...
    >
    > The art of Dan Barfield:
    >
    > http://www.danbarfield.com/index.php
    >
    > About Dan Barfield posted 2008-01-28 11:22:00 by Dan
    > I have often been asked by critics and students for the influences that
    > have
    > shaped my "philosophy of art." I rattle off a few well known names and a
    > few
    > well known "schools" of art which seems to satisfy them.The truth is....I
    > don't have a philosophy of art. My paintings grow out of my philosophy of
    > life and from the experiences of the life that I live and have lived since
    > childhood.
    >
    > I grew up along the east coast between Savannah, Georgia and Jacksonville,
    > Florida, when that coast was still wild and undeveloped. School was a
    > prison
    > for me, a thing to be endured only long enough to escape into the birdsong
    > silence and deep shadows of the woods and river swamps, or the sun washed
    > marshes and sea islands of the coast.
    > Then, as all teen-agers must, there came a time when I rebelled against
    > this
    > life. I left this life behind and went to art school and college. I
    > embraced
    > any road, any thought, any philosophy that took me away from that "old
    > life"
    > which seemed somehow dull and meaningless. I learned all of the names and
    > catch phrases of the intellectual artist, embraced all of the currently
    > popular "schools," and lived the life of "artist as rock-and roll star."
    > And
    > I did it well, getting my undergraduate degree in art from Columbus State,
    > and my Master of Fine Art from Savannah College of art and Design, showing
    > in Europe and America,wearing the laurels of success, never allowing
    > myself
    > to admit that I was lying to myself and living someone else's life.
    >
    > Then a major event in my life took place in which I lost everything. I was
    > living in my car with no home, eating at the Saint Francis mission in St.
    > Augustine, Florida, and being forced to rethink my life........In
    > retrospect
    > it is the best thing that could have happened to me. I returned to the
    > beauty and basic truths of my childhood. I again embraced the beaauty of
    > the
    > earth and the joy of being alive and free. This is where these paintings
    > are
    > born.
    >
    > GALLERY ONE posted 2008-01-28 10:29:41 by Dan
    > This is my personal favorite series. I have attempted to reach deep into
    > the
    > human psyche here and create paintings that will be recognized across all
    > cultures and times. To this end I have worked flat with no attempt to make
    > them appear as anything except flat paintings on flat surfaces. There is
    > no
    > attempt at perspective or depth; often there is no foreground,
    > middleground,
    > or background. The colors are vivid and bright, the flora and fauna would
    > never be recognized by science, the fruits and flowers would never be
    > found
    > in a florist or grocer....I hope that they are universal symbols of that
    > which they represent.
    >
    > The observer will notice at once the power and importance of the sun
    > symbol.
    > Actually the sun was usually the first thing painted and the rest of the
    > painting grew up around it. Those who have lived in the tropics will
    > understand this, as the sun is the ruler of the day and of all life.
    >
    > The ruler of all life ....It has been suggested that the sun is a "god"
    > symbol in these paintings, and I am comfortable with that. (Note that I
    > have
    > said a 'god symbol,' not a god....a symbol only.) The sun is the source of
    > all life as all energy comes from the sun...we are of the sun, we eat the
    > sun when we eat vegetables, or the meat that feeds on the vegetation.
    >
    > Others have found a "Christian" image in the three "Ancestral Figures"
    > that
    > stand guard with spears and huge erections over this fecund paradise.(I
    > have
    > to admit that these figures are stolen from Australian rock paintings and
    > modified to suit my needs.)
    >
    > I think I have said enough about these paintings now. I have a tendency to
    > get long winded and I would not want to color your perceptions. And after
    > all, art does not take place in the paint or on the wall; art does not
    > take
    > place in the mind of the artists;...art takes place in the interaction
    > between the viewer and the painting. Art is a different experience for
    > each
    > of us, modified or enhanced by our own unique experiences.
    >
    > The Dream:
    > http://www.danbarfield.com/gallery1.php
    >
    > GALLERY TWO posted 2008-01-28 10:04:00 by Dan
    > What can one say about these paintings? These are scenes that I have
    > stumbled across from the Low Country of South Carolina to the provinces of
    > the Philippines. Shrimp boats of the South Carolina and Georgia coast, a
    > lighthouse somewhere on the Golden Isles of Georgia; a mother and daughter
    > in Costa Rica, two young Filipino girls with the family's carabao...other
    > images of other times and places....
    >
    > Oil on canvas; simple, but I enjoy the discipline needed to render a
    > sceene
    > that exists on the outside of my mind....simple beauty of a simple life.
    >
    > I hope that you, the viewer, enjoy them, that you are sensitive to the
    > beauty of them, and that they bring you happiness.
    >
    > The Reality:
    > http://www.danbarfield.com/gallery2.php
    >
    > --
    > "Wobble":
    > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UVIF2-qWIUc
    >
    > Henry Conley: guitar
    > Riley Yielding: trumpet
    > Sir Charles: saxophone
    > Sam Phillips: bass
    > Brad Strickland: drums
    > Will Dockery: words
    >
    > "Wobble" was written by Will Dockery & Henry Conley
    >
    > "Last Dream Today":
    > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GSpYx8sSFP0
    >
    > Brian Mallard - guitar
    > Dan Davidson - bass
    > Josh Railey - drums
    > Riley Yeilding - trumpet
    > Sir Charles - saxophone
    > Will Dockery - vocals
    >
    > "Last Dream Today" was written by Will Dockery and Brian Mallard
    >
    >
    >



    my dad is very old and has never been interested
    in sharing his art but with close friends and family.

    we try to get him to go online like some of his
    art friends. however, he really doesn't feel
    like his work merits that kind of exposure.

    i think it does. however, i'm far from an expert.



    that dan barfeild stuff is abstract.
    however, my dads stuff is more like yours.
    the barfield stuff is pretty and phantasmagorical
    in an otherworldly kind of way. it kept taking
    me to the astral plane. that's some of my
    favorite stuff. people who paint like
    that usually don't get much exposure.
    that's what makes it "art."

    i'm not big on discussing paints and techniques
    but i love sharing ideas like you just did.
    my dad just offloaded a few paintings on to
    me as gifts. at some point, i'll scan them
    onto a webpage dedicated to him. i really
    don't know what's going to happen to all of
    his stuff when he goes. he's got hundreds
    laying around the house.
    msifg, Feb 7, 2009
    #5
  6. Will Dockery

    Will Dockery Guest

    "Dale Houstman" <> wrote:
    > Will Dockery wrote:
    >
    > I've posted a new gallery of some of my recent abstract paintings, which
    > > some of you may have an interest in checking out, for whichever reasons

    you
    > > prefer.
    > >
    > > These paintings are made with a variety of materials from oil,

    watercolor
    > > and pastel paints, to housepaint, solvents and melted plastics:
    > >
    > > http://www.fototime.com/inv/E917106F136751F
    > >
    > > Comments and critique, as with all my work in all forms, is most

    welcome.
    > >

    > They are all pretty much the same apart from being different colors. I


    The photos were not taken by Martin Scorsese, but just a pal with a camera,
    so first off they're not as crisp a veiw as you'd get if you were standing
    in the shed with me, but that tossed off comment is typical of your lazy
    commentary. I have to say if, say, you think that these two close-ups of a
    section of two of the paintings:

    http://tinyurl.com/green-planet

    compared with

    http://tinyurl.com/cqzktb

    And still shrug and claim they're "pretty much the same", then you either
    need a new pair of glasses, or you're indulging in your typical, and
    tiresomely whining negativity game.

    Why not try to get past your jealousy and open your eyes for once?

    > suppose you think they're akin to Pollack's work, but Pollack is one of


    Well, I love what I've seen of Pollack's art, yeah, although I've only seen
    photographs of it. The person who probably influenced me more, since I did
    spend several days looking at his paintings up close back in 1991 or so, was
    Richard Pousette-Dart, when his paintings came to Shadowville on tour:

    http://www.mannysilvermangallery.com/artists/richard_pousette-dart-biography-chronology.html

    I saw these paintings, and I "got" them.

    Unlike you, I looked long and hard at them, and began trying to "get"
    something of my own.

    I've met your type before, and /or course/ you were never in this place...
    you shrugged your shoulders, took a glance and walked away, angry about how
    "anyone can splash some pain on a canvas, so why should I bother?', since
    you already did in your mind. I've also seen your type sitting by the bar,
    or skulking behind the pool table, while a performer's onstage... "I can
    play better than that..." or "Anyone can write that poetry crap, just string
    some words together, and shuffle them in a deck of index cards...",
    different faces, same old whine.

    Which you've perfected to an art form of its own.

    > those figures (like "e.e. cummings" in poetry) who - although marvelous
    > in their own right - have served as "bad examples" and invitations to
    > laziness for an entire generation of artists.


    Or with your example, an invitation to a lazy shrug of the shoulders and an
    "it's just paint splattered on a canvas".

    Of course, you're as much an example of that "generation of artists",
    yourself... it just boils down to the fact that you can't "tolerate" anyone
    who excells at "your game", and thus your eternal cycle of agressively
    attempting to tear down everything, every "abstract" poet or artist that
    crosses your path... am I right? Deep down, you know I am.

    With "cummings" it is the
    > notion that if one just puts in enough punctuation, splits up words,


    Or your added touch of shuffling them in a deck of index cards... heh.

    > spells words oddly, etc. then poetry is inevitable.


    Or, as with your poetry, the idea that (from the "bad example" of William
    Burroughs) sentences chopped up and shuffled in a deck of index cards will
    inevitably turn into a poem...

    > The Beats obviously serve a similar function for you


    While you've based your entire poetry "career" on the methods of William
    Burroughs... project much?

    > Here - in your "paintings" - you seem to think if


    Key word: "seem to think".

    You "seem" to be projecting your own lack of originality and "vision" on
    me... for about the umpteenth time.

    > you dribble enough colored crap on a canvas,


    One of my methods is to use only "found" materials, which really does make
    (in my opinion) a work which is the perfect expression of some "inner
    passion", and better yet (as with the best poetry) a document of that
    feeling, or whatever... but I know how you hate all that "mystic" "feelings"
    stuff...

    You glance at a poem and give a non-specific "plagiarism" libel, and
    appatrently you have the same narrow-minded veiw of art... and I've never
    seen you comment once on another poet besides yourself positively, which
    smacks of a form of competitive jealousy, which is pretty unoriginal in
    itself.

    > But they are just charmless
    > masses of direction-less non-intent.


    Since I doubt you've even looked at them for more than 30 seconds, I'll just
    shrug and give a "thanks for looking and commenting" back at you.

    The contrast with Pollack's works
    > is instructive: despite his being called a "dribbler" his works reveal
    > intent, there is strength, energy, and a "rush toward an answer" to his
    > lines: he is truly finding the "expression" in "abstract expressionism".


    Plus his paintings have the name "Jackson Pollack" on them, right?

    You're just a broken record of bitter negativity, perhaps because of your
    own failures, I suppose?

    > Yours are an (unintentional and unfunny) parody of his accomplishments,
    > more a critique of what those who disliked his work thought his work was
    > than an understanding of his vision.


    Suddenly you pretend to have and/or "understand" a "vision"... heh.

    > Yes Jackson also used housepaint, which has led to a set of preservation
    > problems


    A can of Clearcoat works wonders, pal... get over your bitterness at those
    of us who can, and try to get "something" of your own done, perhaps? Thanks
    for having a look and commenting, though... maybe someday you'll have
    something useful to say rather than just project your own lack of
    originality and "vision" on the rest of us who do work to those goals of
    getting the vision down as art?

    --
    "Twilight Girl" and other song-poems by Will Dockery:
    http://www.myspace.com/willdockery
    Will Dockery, Feb 7, 2009
    #6
  7. Will Dockery

    George Dance Guest

    On Feb 6, 6:45 pm, "Will Dockery" <>
    wrote:
    > I've posted a new gallery of some of my recent abstract paintings, which
    > some of you may have an interest in checking out, for whichever reasons you
    > prefer.
    >
    > These paintings are made with a variety of materials from oil, watercolor
    > and pastel paints, to housepaint, solvents and melted plastics:
    >
    > http://www.fototime.com/inv/E917106F136751F
    >
    > Comments and critique, as with all my work in all forms, is most welcome.
    >



    Reminds me of some of this guy's stuff:
    http://www.skypoint.com/members/dmh7/GhostPosters/Borborygmae/


    In a couple of cases, (Ozone Stigmata being one I remember), I liked
    your detail shot better than the full picture. For that reason I think
    I'd appreciate the originals better if I could enlarge them and see
    more detail. Not that I didn't like any of them. "Planet Fall" had a
    composition I liked; I wouldn't be ashamed to have it on a wall of my
    living room.

    Unfortunately, this whole way of creating art reminds me of tossing
    off -- just throwing something down and hopin the result is art. I see
    too much of that in attempts to write poetry, on usenet and elsewyere,
    and I don't like it here any better here than there. Occasionally a
    good piece does result; but that's always too dependent on accident or
    mere coincidence for my liking.






    > --
    > "Twilight Girl" and other song-poems by Will Dockery:http://www.myspace.com/willdockery
    George Dance, Feb 7, 2009
    #7
  8. Will Dockery

    msifg Guest

    "Dale Houstman" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Savageduck wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> Pollock is much maligned.
    >> Most of those who ridicule his work have not experienced it, only imagine
    >> that they are capable of similar work without his artistry and intellect
    >> (alcohol not withstanding) they never attain his result. He was unique.

    >
    > As we have seen with Mockery's "paintings" even those who profess to like
    > Pollock's work malign it with their misunderstanding of it. Will appears
    > to think the art is in the dribble.
    >
    > dmh



    well, now-
    what have we here?
    houstman bringing it down to b's cat level
    of altering the posters name.

    (a tell tale sign that someone just got owned.)
    msifg, Feb 7, 2009
    #8
  9. Will Dockery

    George Dance Guest

    On Feb 7, 9:05 am, Savageduck <> wrote:
    > On 2009-02-07 04:24:20 -0800, Dale Houstman <> said:
    >
    >
    >
    > > Will Dockery wrote:
    > >> I've posted a new gallery of some of my recent abstract paintings, which
    > >> some of you may have an interest in checking out, for whichever reasons you
    > >> prefer.

    >
    > >> These paintings are made with a variety of materials from oil, watercolor
    > >> and pastel paints, to housepaint, solvents and melted plastics:

    >
    > >>http://www.fototime.com/inv/E917106F136751F

    >
    > >> Comments and critique, as with all my work in all forms, is most welcome.

    >
    > > They are all pretty much the same apart from being different colors. I
    > > suppose you think they're akin to Pollack's work, but Pollack is one of
    > > those figures (like "e.e. cummings" in poetry) who - although marvelous
    > > in their own right - have served as "bad examples" and invitations to
    > > laziness for an entire generation of artists. With "cummings" it is the
    > > notion that if one just puts in enough punctuation, splits up words,
    > > spells words oddly, etc. then poetry is inevitable. The Beats obviously
    > > serve a similar function for you and many other mediocre-to-terrible
    > > performance "artists". Here - in your "paintings" - you seem to think
    > > if you dribble enough colored crap on a canvas, it must - by some
    > > universal law of cosmic kindness - create a work which is the perfect
    > > expression of some inner passion you pretend to feel. But they are just
    > > charmless masses of direction-less non-intent. The contrast with
    > > Pollack's works is instructive: despite his being called a "dribbler"
    > > his works reveal intent, there is strength, energy, and a "rush toward
    > > an answer" to his lines: he is truly finding the "expression" in
    > > "abstract expressionism". Yours are an (unintentional and unfunny)
    > > parody of his accomplishments, more a critique of what those who
    > > disliked his work thought his work was than an understanding of his
    > > vision.

    >
    > > Yes Jackson also used housepaint, which has led to a set of
    > > preservation problems: you needn't worry that this will happen in your
    > > case - not one of these "paintings" needs to survive past next week.

    >
    > > dmh

    >
    > Pollock is much maligned.
    > Most of those who ridicule his work have not experienced it, only
    > imagine that they are capable of similar work without his artistry and
    > intellect (alcohol not withstanding) they never attain his result. He
    > was unique.



    Well, one major difference was that Pollock, unlike so many of his
    imitators, was not just an "artist" but a painter; so he knew and was
    able to use traditional rules or tools of composition in his work. Too
    many wannabe "artists" never take the time to learn to be painters,
    just as too many wannabe poets never take the time to learn to be
    writers.




    >
    > Here is Pollock #2 at the Munson Williams Procter Arts Institute Utica
    > NY,http://snipr.com/7or04-wiksca
    > MWPhttp://www.mwpai.org/museum/collections/modernandcontemporary/
    >
    > --
    > Regards,
    > Savageduck
    George Dance, Feb 7, 2009
    #9
  10. Will Dockery

    George Dance Guest

    On Feb 7, 10:57 am, "msifg" <> wrote:
    > "Dale Houstman" <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:...
    >
    > > Savageduck wrote:

    >
    > >> Pollock is much maligned.
    > >> Most of those who ridicule his work have not experienced it, only imagine
    > >> that they are capable of similar work without his artistry and intellect
    > >> (alcohol not withstanding) they never attain his result. He was unique..

    >
    > > As we have seen with Mockery's "paintings" even those who profess to like
    > > Pollock's work malign it with their misunderstanding of it. Will appears
    > > to think the art is in the dribble.

    >
    > > dmh

    >
    > well, now-
    > what have we here?
    > houstman bringing it down to b's cat level
    > of altering the posters name.
    >
    > (a tell tale sign that someone just got owned.)



    Nahh, "Savageduck" appears to be a real nym. I checked his profile;
    he's been posting under that nym for years.
    George Dance, Feb 7, 2009
    #10
  11. Will Dockery

    msifg Guest

    "George Dance" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    On Feb 6, 6:45 pm, "Will Dockery" <>
    wrote:
    > I've posted a new gallery of some of my recent abstract paintings, which
    > some of you may have an interest in checking out, for whichever reasons
    > you
    > prefer.
    >
    > These paintings are made with a variety of materials from oil, watercolor
    > and pastel paints, to housepaint, solvents and melted plastics:
    >
    > http://www.fototime.com/inv/E917106F136751F
    >
    > Comments and critique, as with all my work in all forms, is most welcome.
    >



    Reminds me of some of this guy's stuff:
    http://www.skypoint.com/members/dmh7/GhostPosters/Borborygmae/


    In a couple of cases, (Ozone Stigmata being one I remember), I liked
    your detail shot better than the full picture. For that reason I think
    I'd appreciate the originals better if I could enlarge them and see
    more detail. Not that I didn't like any of them. "Planet Fall" had a
    composition I liked; I wouldn't be ashamed to have it on a wall of my
    living room.

    Unfortunately, this whole way of creating art reminds me of tossing
    off -- just throwing something down and hopin the result is art. I see
    too much of that in attempts to write poetry, on usenet and elsewyere,
    and I don't like it here any better here than there. Occasionally a
    good piece does result; but that's always too dependent on accident or
    mere coincidence for my liking.




    *it's definitely not for everybody.

    look-
    the most complex work of art that requires
    years of schooling to master is always
    open to intense scrutiny as well, esp in the art
    world.

    i think it goes by feel more than technique.

    and, i think that's how it goes with writing as well.

    the most important thing is to have fun in life.

    the cynics disagree. usually, they're off somehere
    whining about being better than others and not
    actually doing anything worth while themselves.

    none of us are going to make any kind of dent
    in THAT world. but, for eachother and around
    here?- we make plenty of differences in peoples
    lives.

    to me, that's all that matters in the long run.

    rules or no rules.
    msifg, Feb 7, 2009
    #11
  12. Will Dockery

    msifg Guest

    "George Dance" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    On Feb 7, 10:57 am, "msifg" <> wrote:
    > "Dale Houstman" <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:...
    >
    > > Savageduck wrote:

    >
    > >> Pollock is much maligned.
    > >> Most of those who ridicule his work have not experienced it, only
    > >> imagine
    > >> that they are capable of similar work without his artistry and
    > >> intellect
    > >> (alcohol not withstanding) they never attain his result. He was unique.

    >
    > > As we have seen with Mockery's "paintings" even those who profess to
    > > like
    > > Pollock's work malign it with their misunderstanding of it. Will appears
    > > to think the art is in the dribble.

    >
    > > dmh

    >
    > well, now-
    > what have we here?
    > houstman bringing it down to b's cat level
    > of altering the posters name.
    >
    > (a tell tale sign that someone just got owned.)



    Nahh, "Savageduck" appears to be a real nym. I checked his profile;
    he's been posting under that nym for years.


    *yeah-
    well, i ducked that reply.

    check out the "mockery."

    see, i've got some luck.
    msifg, Feb 7, 2009
    #12
  13. Will Dockery

    Will Dockery Guest

    "George Dance" wrote:
    >"Will Dockery" wrote:


    (Google ain't quoting right this morning, or something, so my replies are
    with an *)

    > I've posted a new gallery of some of my recent abstract paintings, which
    > some of you may have an interest in checking out, for whichever reasons

    you prefer.
    >
    > These paintings are made with a variety of materials from oil, watercolor
    > and pastel paints, to housepaint, solvents and melted plastics:
    >
    > http://www.fototime.com/inv/E917106F136751F
    >
    > Comments and critique, as with all my work in all forms, is most welcome.
    >


    Reminds me of some of this guy's stuff:
    http://www.skypoint.com/members/dmh7/GhostPosters/Borborygmae/

    *Heh... who would have figured?

    >In a couple of cases, (Ozone Stigmata being one I remember), I liked

    your detail shot better than the full picture. For that reason I think I'd
    appreciate the originals better if I could enlarge >them and see more
    detail.

    *Yes, as I noted to another person a few minutes ago:

    "...The photos were not taken by Martin Scorsese, but just a pal with a
    camera, so first off they're not as crisp a veiw as you'd get if you were
    standing in the shed with me, but that tossed off comment is typical of your
    lazy commentary. I have to say if, say, you think that these two close-ups
    of a section of two of the paintings:

    http://tinyurl.com/green-planet

    compared with

    http://tinyurl.com/cqzktb

    And still shrug and claim they're 'pretty much the same', then you either
    need a new pair of glasses, or you're indulging in your typical, and
    tiresomely whining negativity game..."

    Oh course, this person (who no doubt fancies himself a better paint dribber)
    probably never made it past the opening thumbnail, if his usual standard of
    critique is the way he approached these paintings.

    But, yes, properly scanned or better photographed, I'm sure they'd have more
    of their intended impact, thanks for taking the time to give them a try.

    >Not that I didn't like any of them. "Planet Fall" had a

    composition I liked; I wouldn't be ashamed to have it on a wall of my living
    room.
    >
    >Unfortunately, this whole way of creating art reminds me of tossing

    off -- just throwing something down and hopin the result is >art.

    *I've thrown away and given away many paintings that I think failed...
    sometimes to my regret. When I moved out of a house back in 1989, I left all
    the paintings I'd done up to that point there, because they just didn't
    "move" me anymore, or at least not enough to "move" them... damned heavy
    pieces... I feel this batch works better, so far...

    >I see

    too much of that in attempts to write poetry, on usenet and elsewyere,
    >and I don't like it here any better here than there.


    *You might like my comix better... maybe...

    >Occasionally a

    good piece does result; but that's always too dependent on accident or
    >mere coincidence for my liking.


    *Yes, I'm guilty of about 20 years of poetry that could be judged in that
    way, just over the last decade or so knuckling down to working in more
    "universal language" and trying the more traditional forms... I credit the
    collaborations with musicians who insist on knowing what the hell's going on
    at the time with working more and more in that direction,

    For example, HC /hates/ things like the title "Ozone Stigmata" and so forth,
    he tried to insist we call it "Handbasket From Hell" for weeks, "You gotta
    have the listener be able to find it on the jukebox!", but the words "Ozone
    Stigmata" are jam-packed with multiple meanings, and I have to stand my
    ground in certain cases like these... I can only pander to the masses so
    far... heh.

    --
    "Twilight Girl" and other song-poems by Will Dockery:
    http://www.myspace.com/willdockery
    Will Dockery, Feb 7, 2009
    #13
  14. Will Dockery

    George Dance Guest

    On Feb 7, 11:16 am, "msifg" <> wrote:
    > "George Dance" <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:...
    > On Feb 7, 10:57 am, "msifg" <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > "Dale Houstman" <> wrote in message

    >
    > >news:...

    >
    > > > Savageduck wrote:

    >
    > > >> Pollock is much maligned.
    > > >> Most of those who ridicule his work have not experienced it, only
    > > >> imagine
    > > >> that they are capable of similar work without his artistry and
    > > >> intellect
    > > >> (alcohol not withstanding) they never attain his result. He was unique.

    >
    > > > As we have seen with Mockery's "paintings" even those who profess to
    > > > like
    > > > Pollock's work malign it with their misunderstanding of it. Will appears
    > > > to think the art is in the dribble.

    >
    > > > dmh

    >
    > > well, now-
    > > what have we here?
    > > houstman bringing it down to b's cat level
    > > of altering the posters name.

    >
    > > (a tell tale sign that someone just got owned.)

    >
    > Nahh, "Savageduck" appears to be a real nym. I checked his profile;
    > he's been posting under that nym for years.
    >
    > *yeah-
    > well, i ducked that reply.
    >
    > check out the "mockery."
    >



    Got it. I missed that on the first read.

    Maybe Dale wants a new name for himself. I'll work on that. So far the
    best I have is "Pale Hammesimitation", but that's a bit lengthy. I'll
    try some recursions. 8)





    > see, i've got some luck.
    George Dance, Feb 7, 2009
    #14
  15. Will Dockery

    Will Dockery Guest

    "msifg" <> wrote:
    >"Will Dockery" wrote:
    >
    > >> I've posted a new gallery of some of my recent abstract paintings,

    which
    > >> > some of you may have an interest in checking out, for whichever

    reasons you prefer.
    > >> >
    > >> > These paintings are made with a variety of materials from oil,

    watercolor
    > >> > and pastel paints, to housepaint, solvents and melted plastics:
    > >> >
    > >> > http://www.fototime.com/inv/E917106F136751F
    > >> >
    > >> > Comments and critique, as with all my work in all forms, are most

    welcome.
    > >>
    > >> cool!
    > >>
    > >> my dad just sent me a bunch of abstract art.
    > >>
    > >> it's some of my favorite kind of art.
    > >>
    > >> my dad paints on a regular basis.

    > >
    > > Are any of your father's works online anywhere? I'd like to check those
    > > out,
    > > since abstract is by far my favorite form.
    > >
    > > I hope to somedays get some of Sulzbach's work scanned and online, but
    > > he's
    > > such a hermit-type, living out in the wouds of Alabama, it'll be some

    trick getting that done.
    > >
    > >> thanks for sharing.
    > >>
    > >> (sharks beware:
    > >> i've got a new pair of teeth.)

    > >
    > > This unsent post I just found in my "Drafts" section, from last year, of
    > > another old-time artist friend of mine, you might enjoy, as well:
    > >
    > > Here are galleries of Barfield, my teacher, who has been highly

    influenced
    > > by Aborigine art and culture...
    > >
    > > The art of Dan Barfield:


    <snip for brevity>

    > > http://www.danbarfield.com/index.php
    > >
    > > The Dream:
    > > http://www.danbarfield.com/gallery1.php
    > >
    > > The Reality:
    > > http://www.danbarfield.com/gallery2.php

    >
    > my dad is very old and has never been interested
    > in sharing his art but with close friends and family.
    >
    > we try to get him to go online like some of his
    > art friends. however, he really doesn't feel
    > like his work merits that kind of exposure.
    >
    > i think it does. however, i'm far from an expert.


    Hope you can convince him to put some out for the world, though.

    > that dan barfeild stuff is abstract.
    > however, my dads stuff is more like yours.
    > the barfield stuff is pretty and phantasmagorical
    > in an otherworldly kind of way. it kept taking
    > me to the astral plane. that's some of my
    > favorite stuff. people who paint like
    > that usually don't get much exposure.
    > that's what makes it "art."
    >
    > i'm not big on discussing paints and techniques
    > but i love sharing ideas like you just did.
    > my dad just offloaded a few paintings on to
    > me as gifts. at some point, i'll scan them
    > onto a webpage dedicated to him. i really
    > don't know what's going to happen to all of
    > his stuff when he goes. he's got hundreds
    > laying around the house.


    Barfield's art almost got me arrested a few years ago, a nosy peeping tom
    thought I had "dead bodies" stashed in the backroom:

    ----
    Columbus Ledger-Enquirer (GA)
    July 13, 1997
    Section: LOCAL
    Edition: FIRST
    Page: B1

    HOW GROSS THY ART
    Tim Chitwood

    Apparently it was all just a big misunderstanding.

    The misunderstanding led to a 911 call about a decomposing body in an old
    house M***** S*****'s husband R****** owns at 2113 **th St. in Columbus.
    That led to the discovery that it wasn't a body after all, but artwork made
    of barbed wire and blowtorched Barbie dolls. But it sure looked like a body
    to police. And it looked like a body to paramedics. And it definitely looked
    like a body to Danny W****.

    Danny is a real estate agent who with M***** went to look at the house July
    2. He wanted to buy it and fix it up. It needs fixing up. The roof leaks in
    places and some of the floor's rotting. The S**** now live on F**** Drive
    and use the **th Street house for storage. M*****'s son Will Dockery lets
    friends -- artists, poets and madmen, Will says -- store their work there.

    Among those artists is Dan Barfield, who has a concept piece called
    "Vietnam,'' part of which the veteran made of melted Barbie dolls. ("He
    hates Barbies,'' says his wife Judy.) It now lies on the floor among other
    stuff stored in the dark, northwest bedroom of the ##th Street house. To
    someone who didn't know what it was, it might look like a rib cage and
    sternum atop decayed matter.

    That's what it looked like to Danny W**** when he walked into that musty
    room, first staring up at the rafters. Then he looked down. Then he froze.
    Then he ran.

    He wasn't sure what he saw. Maybe a body. Maybe it was sealed with wax,
    which trapped the odor. Maybe this was a bizarre ritual. Maybe he didn't
    want to know.

    M***** followed Danny as he dashed outside, where he tried to make a call on
    his cell phone. She told him not to. According to her, she told him he'd
    just seen some artwork. According to Danny, she never said that; she just
    said they didn't need the police coming there.

    This did not sound reassuring. Danny had to make that call. Now don't call
    the police, M***** said again. She says she also told Danny her son Will had
    a bad temper, and he wouldn't like Danny calling the police.

    She says Danny replied that the police wouldn't do anything to her; she
    wasn't involved. That's true, she said (she wasn't involved in storing the
    art), but the police needn't be bothered.

    M***** claims Danny then offered her $13,000 for the house, then said it
    needed so much work the most he could give her was $10,000.

    Danny maintains all M***** did was tell him no one should call the police.

    The next day, someone called the police.

    About 10:30 a.m., police and paramedics rushed to the house, unboarded a
    door to get in and examined what they, too, thought was a decaying body,
    oddly odorless. Then they poked it and figured out it wasn't. It was such a
    weird story, the Ledger-Enquirer ran it on the front page July 4.

    That's how M****** learned police had broken into the house. She was
    perturbed. She blamed Danny.

    Danny won't say he called police, but admits he told someone what he thought
    he saw. Stan Swiney of the 911 center says the call reportedly came from a
    Billy Hanson. (No Billy Hanson listed in the Columbus telephone directory
    was involved; I called.)

    The 911 report said someone saw the alleged corpse through a window. That's
    difficult: The room's dark; the window's dirty; the art's hard to see.

    The artist, Dan Barfield, says it's funny Danny W**** would be frightened,
    because the real estate agent stopped by a few months ago when Dan was
    moving art into the house, and this piece was out on the lawn at the time.
    The artist claims the agent told him a decayed body was found in the house
    once.

    Danny says that's outrageous: He has never met Dan Barfield. "I would
    remember that,'' he says.

    Danny says he just wanted to buy the house to help clean up the
    neighborhood, where he owns other property. ``As far as I'm concerned now,
    they couldn't give it to me,'' he says.

    Perhaps it will remain the house of scary art, where once people thought
    they saw a dead body.

    But didn't.
    ----

    Barfield took off to live in Texas a year or so ago and I haven't heard a
    word from him since... hope the old cuss is doing okay out there.

    --
    "Twilight Girl" and other song-poems by Will Dockery:
    http://www.myspace.com/willdockery
    Will Dockery, Feb 7, 2009
    #15
  16. Will Dockery

    Guest

    On Feb 6, 3:45 pm, "Will Dockery" <>
    wrote:
    > I've posted a new gallery of some of my recent abstract paintings, which
    > some of you may have an interest in checking out, for whichever reasons you
    > prefer.
    >
    > These paintings are made with a variety of materials from oil, watercolor
    > and pastel paints, to housepaint, solvents and melted plastics:
    >
    > http://www.fototime.com/inv/E917106F136751F
    >
    > Comments and critique, as with all my work in all forms, is most welcome.


    Not it isn't! Ah Twitch, if only you had a single honest bone in your
    body.

    What's that 17th slide called? 'Friday Night's Upchuck Chunky - Dried
    and Framed'?

    -blue

    >
    > --
    > "Twilight Girl" and other song-poems by Will Dockery:http://www.myspace.com/willdockery


    Wow, still calling your stuff on myspace song-poems, huh? What a
    dreamer, Bill, what a dreamer.
    , Feb 7, 2009
    #16
  17. Will Dockery

    Rob Evans Guest

    "msifg" <> wrote in message
    news:ebijl.992$%...
    >
    > "Dale Houstman" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Savageduck wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>> Pollock is much maligned.
    >>> Most of those who ridicule his work have not experienced it, only
    >>> imagine that they are capable of similar work without his artistry and
    >>> intellect (alcohol not withstanding) they never attain his result. He
    >>> was unique.

    >>
    >> As we have seen with Mockery's "paintings" even those who profess to like
    >> Pollock's work malign it with their misunderstanding of it. Will appears
    >> to think the art is in the dribble.
    >>
    >> dmh

    >
    >
    > well, now-
    > what have we here?
    > houstman bringing it down to b's cat level
    > of altering the posters name.
    >
    > (a tell tale sign that someone just got owned.)
    >

    Or a tell-tale sign that you can't follow a thread (even if you move your
    lips).

    Rob


    --
    Rob Evans
    -----------
    When I see a swine,
    I reach for 45-calibre pearls


    --
    Posted via NewsDemon.com - Premium Uncensored Newsgroup Service
    ------->>>>>>http://www.NewsDemon.com<<<<<<------
    Unlimited Access, Anonymous Accounts, Uncensored Broadband Access
    Rob Evans, Feb 7, 2009
    #17
  18. "Dale Houstman" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Will Dockery wrote:
    >> I've posted a new gallery of some of my recent abstract paintings, which
    >> some of you may have an interest in checking out, for whichever reasons
    >> you
    >> prefer.
    >>
    >> These paintings are made with a variety of materials from oil, watercolor
    >> and pastel paints, to housepaint, solvents and melted plastics:
    >>
    >> http://www.fototime.com/inv/E917106F136751F
    >>
    >> Comments and critique, as with all my work in all forms, is most welcome.
    >>

    > They are all pretty much the same apart from being different colors. I
    > suppose you think they're akin to Pollack's work, but Pollack is one of
    > those figures (like "e.e. cummings" in poetry) who - although marvelous in
    > their own right - have served as "bad examples" and invitations to
    > laziness for an entire generation of artists. With "cummings" it is the
    > notion that if one just puts in enough punctuation, splits up words,
    > spells words oddly, etc. then poetry is inevitable. The Beats obviously
    > serve a similar function for you and many other mediocre-to-terrible
    > performance "artists". Here - in your "paintings" - you seem to think if
    > you dribble enough colored crap on a canvas, it must - by some universal
    > law of cosmic kindness - create a work which is the perfect expression of
    > some inner passion you pretend to feel. But they are just charmless masses
    > of direction-less non-intent. The contrast with Pollack's works is
    > instructive: despite his being called a "dribbler" his works reveal
    > intent, there is strength, energy, and a "rush toward an answer" to his
    > lines: he is truly finding the "expression" in "abstract expressionism".
    > Yours are an (unintentional and unfunny) parody of his accomplishments,
    > more a critique of what those who disliked his work thought his work was
    > than an understanding of his vision.
    >
    > Yes Jackson also used housepaint, which has led to a set of preservation
    > problems: you needn't worry that this will happen in your case - not one
    > of these "paintings" needs to survive past next week.
    >
    > dmh


    we can only hope the artist does not do so as well
    Orsen Wells w/Citizen Cain, Feb 7, 2009
    #18
  19. Will Dockery

    Will Dockery Guest

    "Savageduck" wrote:
    > Will Dockery wrote:
    >
    >> I've posted a new gallery of some of my recent abstract paintings, which
    > >> some of you may have an interest in checking out, for whichever reasons

    you prefer.
    > >>
    > >> These paintings are made with a variety of materials from oil,

    watercolor
    > >> and pastel paints, to housepaint, solvents and melted plastics:
    > >>
    > >> http://www.fototime.com/inv/E917106F136751F
    > >>
    > >> Comments and critique, as with all my work in all forms, is most

    welcome.
    >
    > Pollock is much maligned.
    > Most of those who ridicule his work have not experienced it, only
    > imagine that they are capable of similar work without his artistry and
    > intellect


    No, it isn't as easy as so many of those people would think, and certainly
    isn't just a matter of "splashing paint on a board", as folks like to
    assume.

    (alcohol not withstanding) they never attain his result. He
    > was unique.


    He inspired quite a few greats that seem to be often overlooked, such as the
    previously mentioned Richard Dousette-Dart, who was actually a more direct
    influence on my paintings, having studied his works up close.

    http://www.artnet.com/artist/13705/richard-pousette-dart.html

    Pousette-Dart's work was here on exhibition for a few months back in 1991
    (1990 - 1992 Retrospektives in Indianapolis, Detroit, Columbus Georgia,
    Washington), and one of my favorite things to do at the time was to smoke a
    good joint and wander among his paintings.

    > Here is Pollock #2 at the Munson Williams Procter Arts Institute Utica
    > NY, http://snipr.com/7or04-wiksca
    > MWP http://www.mwpai.org/museum/collections/modernandcontemporary/


    Great stuff, yes... a shame so many people just don't "get it".

    > Regards,
    > Savageduck


    Thanks, and great name, btw... heh.

    --
    "Twilight Girl" and other song-poems by Will Dockery:
    http://www.myspace.com/willdockery
    Will Dockery, Feb 7, 2009
    #19
  20. Will Dockery

    Charles Guest

    "Will Dockery" <> wrote in message
    news:6fc28$498ccd9c$4b4c71e9$...
    > I've posted a new gallery of some of my recent abstract paintings, which
    > some of you may have an interest in checking out, for whichever reasons
    > you
    > prefer.
    >
    > These paintings are made with a variety of materials from oil, watercolor
    > and pastel paints, to housepaint, solvents and melted plastics:
    >
    > http://www.fototime.com/inv/E917106F136751F
    >
    > Comments and critique, as with all my work in all forms, is most welcome.


    I especially like "Black and Blue Night."

    Thanks for sharing.
    Charles, Feb 7, 2009
    #20
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