A very unusual digital back...

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Mike Ross, Nov 10, 2003.

  1. Mike Ross

    Mike Ross Guest

    I posted (with no response!) a little while ago, posing the question
    of a 'roll-your-own' digital back for my Rollei 3003.

    I should have guessed, those clever folks at Rollei had already
    thought of it! I found a website which says...

    'The 2000 / 3003 Rollei system was HUGE, covering lenses from 15mm to
    1000mm. Unusual for 35 accessories included a Polaroid Back,
    Interchangeable film magazines, 250 exposure back, IR remote release,
    and electronic interval timer. Perhaps most unusual was the digital
    floppy disk back which was offered to the military, but not sold to
    the public.'

    Has anyone any knowledge of this back? Any more information would be
    welcome!

    The website is at: http://www.cameraquest.com/rol3003.htm BTW.

    Cheers

    Mike
    http://www.corestore.org
    The avalanche has already started
    It is too late for the pebbles to vote...
     
    Mike Ross, Nov 10, 2003
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. The Floppy disc "back" for a 35mm camera wasn't sold to the public for
    good reason.
    A floppy can only store 1.44MB of information.
    Not enough for even a single 4 MP image saved at lowest compression.
    Sony sold a ton of Mavicas with floppy disk memory in the mid-late 90s.
    They probably still sell some Mavicas with a mini-CD memory.
    The downside is that they are pretty heavy and bulky.
    In the "olden" days, 1 MP was a pretty high resolution image.
    Today it is suitable mainly for web and e-mail use.
    Bob Williams


    Mike Ross wrote:

    > I posted (with no response!) a little while ago, posing the question
    > of a 'roll-your-own' digital back for my Rollei 3003.
    >
    > I should have guessed, those clever folks at Rollei had already
    > thought of it! I found a website which says...
    >
    > 'The 2000 / 3003 Rollei system was HUGE, covering lenses from 15mm to
    > 1000mm. Unusual for 35 accessories included a Polaroid Back,
    > Interchangeable film magazines, 250 exposure back, IR remote release,
    > and electronic interval timer. Perhaps most unusual was the digital
    > floppy disk back which was offered to the military, but not sold to
    > the public.'
    >
    > Has anyone any knowledge of this back? Any more information would be
    > welcome!
    >
    > The website is at: http://www.cameraquest.com/rol3003.htm BTW.
    >
    > Cheers
    >
    > Mike
    > http://www.corestore.org
    > The avalanche has already started
    > It is too late for the pebbles to vote...
     
    Robert E. Williams, Nov 10, 2003
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Mike Ross

    Mike Ross Guest

    On Sun, 09 Nov 2003 22:00:15 -0800, "Robert E. Williams"
    <> wrote:

    >The Floppy disc "back" for a 35mm camera wasn't sold to the public for
    >good reason.
    >A floppy can only store 1.44MB of information.
    >Not enough for even a single 4 MP image saved at lowest compression.
    >Sony sold a ton of Mavicas with floppy disk memory in the mid-late 90s.
    >They probably still sell some Mavicas with a mini-CD memory.
    >The downside is that they are pretty heavy and bulky.
    >In the "olden" days, 1 MP was a pretty high resolution image.
    >Today it is suitable mainly for web and e-mail use.
    >Bob Williams


    Bob,

    Whilst your point is well-taken (and I never liked the Mavica), there
    are slightly non-standard higher-density floppies - 2.88MB, for
    instance. And it begs the question; what were the army finding it
    useful for? Must have been good for *something*!

    >Mike Ross wrote:
    >> 'The 2000 / 3003 Rollei system was HUGE, covering lenses from 15mm to
    >> 1000mm. Unusual for 35 accessories included a Polaroid Back,
    >> Interchangeable film magazines, 250 exposure back, IR remote release,
    >> and electronic interval timer. Perhaps most unusual was the digital
    >> floppy disk back which was offered to the military, but not sold to
    >> the public.'
    >>
    >> Has anyone any knowledge of this back? Any more information would be
    >> welcome!


    Cheers

    Mike
    http://www.corestore.org
    The avalanche has already started
    It is too late for the pebbles to vote...
     
    Mike Ross, Nov 10, 2003
    #3
  4. Mike Ross wrote:

    > On Sun, 09 Nov 2003 22:00:15 -0800, "Robert E. Williams"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > >The Floppy disc "back" for a 35mm camera wasn't sold to the public for
    > >good reason.
    > >A floppy can only store 1.44MB of information.
    > >Not enough for even a single 4 MP image saved at lowest compression.
    > >Sony sold a ton of Mavicas with floppy disk memory in the mid-late 90s.
    > >They probably still sell some Mavicas with a mini-CD memory.
    > >The downside is that they are pretty heavy and bulky.
    > >In the "olden" days, 1 MP was a pretty high resolution image.
    > >Today it is suitable mainly for web and e-mail use.
    > >Bob Williams

    >
    > Bob,
    >
    > Whilst your point is well-taken (and I never liked the Mavica), there
    > are slightly non-standard higher-density floppies - 2.88MB, for
    > instance. And it begs the question; what were the army finding it
    > useful for? Must have been good for *something*!
    >


    If you don't want to print hi-res pictures and just want to send pictures by
    e-mail, 640 x 480 pixels is plenty good.
    In fact, even if you have a 2400 x 1800 pixel image, you will have to
    resample it to 640 x 480 or thereabouts so people can view it on their
    e-mail windows. The good thing about the floppy storage, is that anybody can
    play it immediately on any PC with no training. ...No downloads from the
    camera, no Card Readers, no driver software...nada.
    In the military, you are dealing with people from such diverse backgrounds
    that you must select equipment suited to the least trained individuals.
    Perhaps the army wanted to encourage the boys who are verbally challenged
    to send pictures home to their folks.
    I saw a picture in the newspaper of a huge trailer full of computers (in
    Iraq) with soldiers sending e-mails home to their families and loved ones.
    It was said to be a very popular 'hangout".
    I figure that the Sony Mavica FD-75 could store about 20 jpeg images at 640
    x 480 pixels on a floppy. That's not bad.
    Check out the quality at:
    http://www.steves-digicams.com/2001_reviews/fd75.html

    Bob Williams
     
    Robert E. Williams, Nov 10, 2003
    #4
  5. Mike Ross

    Tom Monego Guest

    The quality of the early Mavicas pics was dismal. In fact it is what alot
    folks think of when they think digital photography. Their lenses were awful
    and the jpeg compression gave blurry images (truely blurry). With the FD-91
    Sony got the message and put a much better lens on it, the images were much
    better but the jpeg compression still leaves an artifact filled image. My wife
    has an FD-200 (1.3mp) for her work, the images are OK, but nothing like her
    1.3mp Fuji. The saving to a floppy is a questionable feature, Floppies have an
    extremely high failure rate compared to flash media. The FD-200 takes memory
    sticks so you at least aren't locked into floppies. Technology dies hard.

    Tom


    >If you don't want to print hi-res pictures and just want to send pictures by
    >e-mail, 640 x 480 pixels is plenty good.
    >In fact, even if you have a 2400 x 1800 pixel image, you will have to
    >resample it to 640 x 480 or thereabouts so people can view it on their
    >e-mail windows. The good thing about the floppy storage, is that anybody can
    >play it immediately on any PC with no training. ...No downloads from the
    >camera, no Card Readers, no driver software...nada.
    >In the military, you are dealing with people from such diverse backgrounds
    >that you must select equipment suited to the least trained individuals.
    >Perhaps the army wanted to encourage the boys who are verbally challenged
    >to send pictures home to their folks.
    >I saw a picture in the newspaper of a huge trailer full of computers (in
    >Iraq) with soldiers sending e-mails home to their families and loved ones.
    >It was said to be a very popular 'hangout".
    >I figure that the Sony Mavica FD-75 could store about 20 jpeg images at 640
    >x 480 pixels on a floppy. That's not bad.
    >Check out the quality at:
    > http://www.steves-digicams.com/2001_reviews/fd75.html
    >
    >Bob Williams
    >
    >
    >
     
    Tom Monego, Nov 10, 2003
    #5
  6. Mike Ross

    Tumbleweed Guest

    "Mike Ross" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Sun, 09 Nov 2003 22:00:15 -0800, "Robert E. Williams"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > >The Floppy disc "back" for a 35mm camera wasn't sold to the public for
    > >good reason.
    > >A floppy can only store 1.44MB of information.
    > >Not enough for even a single 4 MP image saved at lowest compression.
    > >Sony sold a ton of Mavicas with floppy disk memory in the mid-late 90s.
    > >They probably still sell some Mavicas with a mini-CD memory.
    > >The downside is that they are pretty heavy and bulky.
    > >In the "olden" days, 1 MP was a pretty high resolution image.
    > >Today it is suitable mainly for web and e-mail use.
    > >Bob Williams

    >
    > Bob,
    >
    > Whilst your point is well-taken (and I never liked the Mavica), there
    > are slightly non-standard higher-density floppies - 2.88MB, for
    > instance. And it begs the question; what were the army finding it
    > useful for? Must have been good for *something*!
    >


    getting pictures quick where quality mattered less than speed.

    --
    Tumbleweed

    Remove theobvious before replying (but no email reply necessary to
    newsgroups)
     
    Tumbleweed, Nov 11, 2003
    #6
  7. Mike Ross

    Mike Ross Guest

    On Mon, 10 Nov 2003 05:20:28 GMT, Mike Ross <>
    wrote:

    >I posted (with no response!) a little while ago, posing the question
    >of a 'roll-your-own' digital back for my Rollei 3003.
    >
    >I should have guessed, those clever folks at Rollei had already
    >thought of it! I found a website which says...
    >
    >'The 2000 / 3003 Rollei system was HUGE, covering lenses from 15mm to
    >1000mm. Unusual for 35 accessories included a Polaroid Back,
    >Interchangeable film magazines, 250 exposure back, IR remote release,
    >and electronic interval timer. Perhaps most unusual was the digital
    >floppy disk back which was offered to the military, but not sold to
    >the public.'
    >
    >Has anyone any knowledge of this back? Any more information would be
    >welcome!
    >
    >The website is at: http://www.cameraquest.com/rol3003.htm BTW.


    Following myself up... just to clear up the mystery, I got an email
    from rollei.de stating definitively that this never got past the
    'concept' stage... the idea had been discussed with the army, but no
    backs were actually built.

    So there we have it, if I want a digiback for my Rollei I'm gonna have
    to build my own!

    Mike
    http://www.corestore.org
    The avalanche has already started
    It is too late for the pebbles to vote...
     
    Mike Ross, Nov 13, 2003
    #7
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Jeff
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    653
  2. AM
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    2,526
  3. Idris Alooma

    Filemaker 6.0 very very slow in loading initially

    Idris Alooma, Sep 22, 2003, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    641
    Idris Alooma
    Sep 22, 2003
  4. Angel thoughts

    NTL very very slow? me or them?

    Angel thoughts, Feb 26, 2004, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    10
    Views:
    1,404
    hEE Hee
    Feb 26, 2004
  5. Thomas Reed

    Quick Book file access very very very slow

    Thomas Reed, Apr 9, 2004, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    7
    Views:
    788
    Palindrome
    Apr 9, 2004
Loading...

Share This Page