a stupid question...

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Beowulf, Aug 12, 2003.

  1. Beowulf

    Beowulf Guest

    Not having owned a digital SLR, i do not understand why one would not
    just set the "film" speed to the highest possible. Or on a digital camera
    does setting the film speed high create graininess, and a low film speed
    allow for low grain in the prints just like with real film?
    Beowulf, Aug 12, 2003
    #1
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  2. Beowulf

    gsum Guest

    That's exactly right - higher sensitivity equals more
    grain just as with higher speed film.

    Graham

    "Beowulf" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > Not having owned a digital SLR, i do not understand why one would not
    > just set the "film" speed to the highest possible. Or on a digital camera
    > does setting the film speed high create graininess, and a low film speed
    > allow for low grain in the prints just like with real film?
    gsum, Aug 12, 2003
    #2
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  3. "Beowulf" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > Not having owned a digital SLR, i do not understand why one would not
    > just set the "film" speed to the highest possible.


    Well, noise is an issue as others have explained... but even if it weren't
    there are still dslr users who use thing like fast lenses, shallow DOF and
    even shoot outdoors

    --
    Martin
    Divide By Cucumber Error. Please Reinstall Universe And Reboot
    Martin Francis, Aug 12, 2003
    #3
  4. Beowulf

    Chris Hoopes Guest

    "Andrew McDonald" <> wrote in message
    news:347_a.2639$...
    > Beowulf wrote:
    > > Not having owned a digital SLR, i do not understand why one would not
    > > just set the "film" speed to the highest possible. Or on a digital

    camera
    > > does setting the film speed high create graininess, and a low film speed
    > > allow for low grain in the prints just like with real film?

    >
    > The price is higher noise, random bits of red, blue and green color in
    > the image.
    >
    > On the P&S cameras I have owned this noise it quite objectionable at
    > even 400 or 800 ISO. My D100 does way better with very little noise up
    > to 800, very tolerable noise at 1600.
    >
    > I actually leave the camera on Auto ISO now. When in shutter priority
    > the camera will bump up the ISO for me to make sure I can keep my
    > shutter speed where I want it.
    >
    > This is very handy for sports/action work since I don't have to worry
    > about changing or fading light. I take a tiny hit in quality when the
    > ISO starts going up but don't have to worry about action blurring the
    > shots. And if there is enough light I know the camera will lower the ISO.
    >
    > This is a huge advantage over film where I had to decide I needed 800
    > ISO film for an event and then all the shots had to suffer as a result.
    > With a digital the ISO can vary from shot to shot based on available
    > light.
    >


    I am going to have to try that technique at my next action assignment.
    So far, I have stayed away from the auto-ISO setting on my D100 (as well as
    auto-WB), but it makes sense for action shots while keeping the shutter
    speed constant.

    Chris
    Chris Hoopes, Aug 12, 2003
    #4
  5. Beowulf

    Chris Hoopes Guest

    "Patrick L." <> wrote in message
    news:tI7_a.8668$...
    >
    > Beowulf <> wrote in message
    > news:p...
    > > Not having owned a digital SLR, i do not understand why one would not
    > > just set the "film" speed to the highest possible. Or on a digital

    camera
    > > does setting the film speed high create graininess, and a low film speed
    > > allow for low grain in the prints just like with real film?
    > >

    >
    >
    > Why add noise to an image if you do not need it? Film grain can have an
    > artistic look, but but digital noise always looks dirty to my eyes.
    >
    > The only reason one would need a higher sensitivity setting is to either,
    > freeze action, or be able to not to use a tripod in low lighting

    situations
    > without flash.
    >
    > If you do not need to do this, then use the lowest film speed, or ISO
    > setting because the pictures will be better, unless one intentionally

    wants
    > the noisy or grainy effect.
    >
    >
    > Patrick
    >
    >
    >
    >


    About the only reason I can see to using the added higher-ISO noise in a
    digital image would be for a grainy "effect" if the image is ONLY going to
    be used for B&W where color noise would not be an issue.
    Chris Hoopes, Aug 12, 2003
    #5
  6. Beowulf

    Guest

    On Tue, 12 Aug 2003 17:11:59 -0400, "Chris Hoopes"
    <> wrote:

    >About the only reason I can see to using the added higher-ISO noise in a
    >digital image would be for a grainy "effect" if the image is ONLY going to
    >be used for B&W where color noise would not be an issue.
    >
    >


    Surely it would be better to add noise (grain) as required using
    Photoshop (or whatever) where there is control and reversibility? Or
    do cameras do it better?

    MJ
    , Aug 12, 2003
    #6
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