A spare battery for the camera.

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Peter Jason, Oct 15, 2012.

  1. Peter Jason

    Peter Jason Guest

    If I buy a spare camera battery and store it away
    as a hedge against obsolescence, would this be a
    good solution? When the battery of my 1997
    mobile phone died, there were no replacement
    batteries available, and so I had to buy a new
    phone!
     
    Peter Jason, Oct 15, 2012
    #1
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  2. Peter Jason

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Peter Jason
    <> wrote:

    > If I buy a spare camera battery and store it away
    > as a hedge against obsolescence, would this be a
    > good solution?


    it will degrade whether you use it or not.

    > When the battery of my 1997
    > mobile phone died, there were no replacement
    > batteries available, and so I had to buy a new
    > phone!


    big deal. the carrier would gladly give you a new and better phone for
    free (or some token amount like $9.99) that does a lot more than the
    old one ever did. that's how they entice you to sign another contract
    and lock you in.

    also, you don't say when it died, but phones from 1997 can't be used
    anymore, so even if you had a stack of batteries, you'd still need to
    replace it because it no longer works.

    similarly, by the time batteries for your camera are obsolete, the
    camera itself will be obsolete. you'll *want* a new camera. think back
    to what digicams were like in 1997.
     
    nospam, Oct 15, 2012
    #2
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  3. Peter Jason

    tony cooper Guest

    On Sun, 14 Oct 2012 20:01:14 -0700, Savageduck
    <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:

    >On 2012-10-14 19:41:21 -0700, Peter Jason <> said:
    >
    >> If I buy a spare camera battery and store it away
    >> as a hedge against obsolescence, would this be a
    >> good solution? When the battery of my 1997
    >> mobile phone died, there were no replacement
    >> batteries available, and so I had to buy a new
    >> phone!

    >
    >No!
    >You would be better off buying the spare battery and use a rotation protocol.
    >One battery (A) in use, and one freshly charged (B) on standby. When
    >"A" is almost, or fully discharged, replace with "B" and charge "A" to
    >be placed on standby in your bag.


    I rotate two batteries, but after each outing with the camera.
    Today's battery gets charged, and the other one is used for the next
    outing.

    To the best of my knowledge, a battery's life is not diminished by
    charging frequently or by being charged before it is low. Nor, is it
    extended by this practice.




    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Oct 15, 2012
    #3
  4. Peter Jason

    tony cooper Guest

    On Sun, 14 Oct 2012 20:25:02 -0700, nospam <>
    wrote:

    >In article <>, Peter Jason
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >> If I buy a spare camera battery and store it away
    >> as a hedge against obsolescence, would this be a
    >> good solution?

    >
    >it will degrade whether you use it or not.
    >
    >> When the battery of my 1997
    >> mobile phone died, there were no replacement
    >> batteries available, and so I had to buy a new
    >> phone!

    >
    >big deal. the carrier would gladly give you a new and better phone for
    >free


    There are no free phones. You may not be charged for it when you pick
    it up, but you will pay for it over the course of your contract. Only
    a sucker thinks the phone is "free".

    >(or some token amount like $9.99) that does a lot more than the
    >old one ever did. that's how they entice you to sign another contract
    >and lock you in.
    >
    >also, you don't say when it died, but phones from 1997 can't be used
    >anymore, so even if you had a stack of batteries, you'd still need to
    >replace it because it no longer works.
    >
    >similarly, by the time batteries for your camera are obsolete, the
    >camera itself will be obsolete. you'll *want* a new camera. think back
    >to what digicams were like in 1997.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Oct 15, 2012
    #4
  5. Peter Jason

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, tony cooper
    <> wrote:

    > >> When the battery of my 1997
    > >> mobile phone died, there were no replacement
    > >> batteries available, and so I had to buy a new
    > >> phone!

    > >
    > >big deal. the carrier would gladly give you a new and better phone for
    > >free

    >
    > There are no free phones.


    yes there are. quite a few, in fact, including the iphone and android
    phones.

    here's a whole bunch:
    <http://www.verizonwireless.com/free-phones.shtml>

    > You may not be charged for it when you pick
    > it up, but you will pay for it over the course of your contract.


    obviously, but you're going to be paying the monthly fee anyway. the
    phone does not cost anything extra.

    not only that, but they don't discount your monthly fee if you refuse
    the phone, so you might as well take it.

    > Only a sucker thinks the phone is "free".


    well let's see...you're paying say $50/mo for service and you sign a
    new contract, then they hand you a new phone for no extra cost. you
    continue to pay $50/mo, just like you were before, but you now have a
    new phone.

    since you think it's not free, where's the charge?

    yes, it's subsidized, but as i said, you are going to be paying the
    monthly fee *anyway* and they don't discount anything if you refuse the
    phone, so you might as well take it.

    it's how the cellphone industry works.
     
    nospam, Oct 15, 2012
    #5
  6. Peter Jason

    Me Guest

    On 15/10/2012 6:47 p.m., nospam wrote:

    > it's how the cellphone industry works.
    >

    Thanks for that description. It makes printer/ink and cigarette
    companies seem honest.
     
    Me, Oct 15, 2012
    #6
  7. Peter Jason

    Martin Brown Guest

    On 15/10/2012 04:01, Savageduck wrote:
    > On 2012-10-14 19:41:21 -0700, Peter Jason <> said:
    >
    >> If I buy a spare camera battery and store it away
    >> as a hedge against obsolescence, would this be a
    >> good solution? When the battery of my 1997
    >> mobile phone died, there were no replacement
    >> batteries available, and so I had to buy a new
    >> phone!


    Usually you can get recently obsoleted batteries if you know where to
    look. The supplies don't just vanish immediately. Chances are that an
    antique phone like that won't work on current networks anyway.

    You probably could still find a used one on eBay if you really wanted to
    (though I don't recommend it).
    >
    > No!
    > You would be better off buying the spare battery and use a rotation
    > protocol.
    > One battery (A) in use, and one freshly charged (B) on standby. When "A"
    > is almost, or fully discharged, replace with "B" and charge "A" to be
    > placed on standby in your bag.


    This is by far the most rational approach. Oh and be sure to carry the
    spare battery in a plastic case so it cannot encounter metallic objects
    and short circuit. They pack enough punch to catch fire if provoked.

    It is easy enough if you have a camera that takes 4xAA you can just buy
    some new batteries if the rechargables run out but for bespoke batteries
    you need a backup already charged just in case.

    --
    Regards,
    Martin Brown
     
    Martin Brown, Oct 15, 2012
    #7
  8. Peter Jason

    jdanield Guest

    Le 15/10/2012 08:54, Me a écrit :
    > On 15/10/2012 6:47 p.m., nospam wrote:
    >
    >> it's how the cellphone industry works.
    >>

    > Thanks for that description. It makes printer/ink and cigarette
    > companies seem honest.


    but not all cell phone companies do that. For example french "freee"
    company makes a ¤20 subscription with no phone

    http://mobile.free.fr/

    but, by the way, you prbably have some relatives that can share a
    phone with you for free or buy seco,d hand phone.

    The OP problem is still important if somebody wants to keep hardware
    for historical purpose, museum... but then it's probably possible to
    adapt some new battery to the old form factor one

    jdd
    NB: for short circuit risk look at a shorted battery:
    http://dodin.org/piwigo/index.php?/tags/88-batteries
    (just found in my pocket once)
     
    jdanield, Oct 15, 2012
    #8
  9. nospam <> wrote:
    > In article <>, tony cooper
    > <> wrote:


    >> >> When the battery of my 1997
    >> >> mobile phone died, there were no replacement
    >> >> batteries available, and so I had to buy a new
    >> >> phone!
    >> >
    >> >big deal. the carrier would gladly give you a new and better phone for
    >> >free

    >>
    >> There are no free phones.


    > yes there are. quite a few, in fact, including the iphone and android
    > phones.


    > here's a whole bunch:
    > <http://www.verizonwireless.com/free-phones.shtml>


    >> You may not be charged for it when you pick
    >> it up, but you will pay for it over the course of your contract.


    > obviously, but you're going to be paying the monthly fee anyway. the
    > phone does not cost anything extra.


    > not only that, but they don't discount your monthly fee if you refuse
    > the phone, so you might as well take it.


    >> Only a sucker thinks the phone is "free".


    > well let's see...you're paying say $50/mo for service and you sign a
    > new contract, then they hand you a new phone for no extra cost. you
    > continue to pay $50/mo, just like you were before, but you now have a
    > new phone.


    > since you think it's not free, where's the charge?


    > yes, it's subsidized, but as i said, you are going to be paying the
    > monthly fee *anyway* and they don't discount anything if you refuse the
    > phone, so you might as well take it.


    > it's how the cellphone industry works.


    Not necessarily in the UK.

    I got a "free" android 2 years ago on a 2 year contract. The two years
    terminated a few months ago, which meant I was eligible to pick up a
    new "free" phone while continuing the same contract. If I had done
    nothing but refuse the new phone offer I would have stayed on the same
    contract with the old phone.

    Some digging behind the marketing bullshit enabled to me to keep the
    old phone and drop down to a new much cheaper contract which gives me
    the same (actually slightly more) "free" monthly usages. But I had to
    make a bit of a fuss to discover that this was a possibility. And then
    I had to make more fuss to return an extra which they had (so I
    thought) assured me was absolutely free forever and turned out to be
    only free for the first few months.

    --
    Chris Malcolm
     
    Chris Malcolm, Oct 15, 2012
    #9
  10. Peter Jason

    tony cooper Guest

    On Sun, 14 Oct 2012 22:47:00 -0700, nospam <>
    wrote:

    >In article <>, tony cooper
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >> >> When the battery of my 1997
    >> >> mobile phone died, there were no replacement
    >> >> batteries available, and so I had to buy a new
    >> >> phone!
    >> >
    >> >big deal. the carrier would gladly give you a new and better phone for
    >> >free

    >>
    >> There are no free phones.

    >
    >yes there are. quite a few, in fact, including the iphone and android
    >phones.
    >
    >here's a whole bunch:
    ><http://www.verizonwireless.com/free-phones.shtml>
    >
    >> You may not be charged for it when you pick
    >> it up, but you will pay for it over the course of your contract.

    >
    >obviously, but you're going to be paying the monthly fee anyway. the
    >phone does not cost anything extra.
    >
    >not only that, but they don't discount your monthly fee if you refuse
    >the phone, so you might as well take it.
    >
    >> Only a sucker thinks the phone is "free".

    >
    >well let's see...you're paying say $50/mo for service and you sign a
    >new contract, then they hand you a new phone for no extra cost. you
    >continue to pay $50/mo, just like you were before, but you now have a
    >new phone.
    >
    >since you think it's not free, where's the charge?


    You lose the ability to change providers, and that may cost you the
    ability to change to a carrier with lower rates, more services, or
    better phones. New plans and new products are introduced continually.

    You've never understood the meaning of the word "free" or the term
    "more expensive".



    >yes, it's subsidized, but as i said, you are going to be paying the
    >monthly fee *anyway* and they don't discount anything if you refuse the
    >phone, so you might as well take it.
    >
    >it's how the cellphone industry works.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Oct 15, 2012
    #10
  11. Peter Jason

    ray Guest

    On Mon, 15 Oct 2012 13:41:21 +1100, Peter Jason wrote:

    > If I buy a spare camera battery and store it away as a hedge against
    > obsolescence, would this be a good solution? When the battery of my
    > 1997 mobile phone died, there were no replacement batteries available,
    > and so I had to buy a new phone!


    First accessory I got for my new Panasonic G3 was a pair of batteries.
    Not so much so that I'll 'always' have them but to use when I'm out and
    exhaust the one in the camera.
     
    ray, Oct 15, 2012
    #11
  12. Peter Jason

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, tony cooper
    <> wrote:

    > You lose the ability to change providers, and that may cost you the
    > ability to change to a carrier with lower rates, more services, or
    > better phones. New plans and new products are introduced continually.


    so what? most people don't change providers on a whim.

    often, they are tied to their provider not because of a contract, but
    because they get free mobile to mobile minutes within the same carrier,
    so not only would they need to change providers for themselves, but
    they'd have to change their entire family and their friends too. won't
    happen. the carriers know this, and is yet another way they lock you
    in.

    or, the carrier they use is the only one that has decent coverage where
    they live and work. they *can't* switch.

    also, the phones are mostly the same on all carriers, especially
    smartphones, so that's not a reason to switch either.

    clearly, you have *no* idea how the cellphone industry works.

    > You've never understood the meaning of the word "free" or the term
    > "more expensive".


    i understand it quite well.

    you *still* don't get it.
     
    nospam, Oct 15, 2012
    #12
  13. Peter Jason

    nospam Guest

    In article <k5ghg5$l5m$>, jdanield <> wrote:

    > The OP problem is still important if somebody wants to keep hardware
    > for historical purpose, museum... but then it's probably possible to
    > adapt some new battery to the old form factor one


    if you want to keep old obsolete hardware for historical purposes, then
    it doesn't matter if it works or not.

    try and find vacuum tubes for old tvs. good luck on that.
     
    nospam, Oct 15, 2012
    #13
  14. Peter Jason

    tony cooper Guest

    On Mon, 15 Oct 2012 09:16:36 -0700, nospam <>
    wrote:

    >In article <>, tony cooper
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >> You lose the ability to change providers, and that may cost you the
    >> ability to change to a carrier with lower rates, more services, or
    >> better phones. New plans and new products are introduced continually.

    >
    >so what? most people don't change providers on a whim.
    >
    >often, they are tied to their provider not because of a contract, but
    >because they get free mobile to mobile minutes within the same carrier,
    >so not only would they need to change providers for themselves, but
    >they'd have to change their entire family and their friends too. won't
    >happen. the carriers know this, and is yet another way they lock you
    >in.
    >
    >or, the carrier they use is the only one that has decent coverage where
    >they live and work. they *can't* switch.
    >
    >also, the phones are mostly the same on all carriers, especially
    >smartphones, so that's not a reason to switch either.
    >
    >clearly, you have *no* idea how the cellphone industry works.
    >
    >> You've never understood the meaning of the word "free" or the term
    >> "more expensive".

    >
    >i understand it quite well.
    >
    >you *still* don't get it.


    There are many reasons a person may think that extending a contract is
    to their benefit. That's not being disputed. But, only a sucker
    thinks the phone is free.



    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Oct 15, 2012
    #14
  15. Peter Jason

    jdanield Guest

    jdanield, Oct 15, 2012
    #15
  16. Peter Jason

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, tony cooper
    <> wrote:

    > There are many reasons a person may think that extending a contract is
    > to their benefit. That's not being disputed. But, only a sucker
    > thinks the phone is free.


    it's free if there is no additional charge.

    if you renew a contract, you get a new phone for free, unless you want
    to pay extra for a fancier model.

    this is not rocket science.
     
    nospam, Oct 15, 2012
    #16
  17. Peter Jason

    nospam Guest

    In article <k5heg1$5b1$>, jdanield <> wrote:

    > > if you want to keep old obsolete hardware for historical purposes, then
    > > it doesn't matter if it works or not.

    >
    > it matters a lot! much more fun when it works


    sure, but it's not required if it's going to be on display.

    nobody is actually going to *use* a 20 year old digital camera for
    anything.

    > > try and find vacuum tubes for old tvs. good luck on that.
    > >

    > build one? some people do


    they build vacuum tubes?

    or back to photography, try to find film for old cameras. when's the
    last time you saw disc film or 110 instamatic film? the cameras still
    work (all mechanical, no battery needed) but you can't get film for
    them.

    > some people also fix old planes


    sure, and people fix and rebuild old cars too.

    however, sometimes you can't get parts and then you're stuck.

    i know someone who had to sell his car because nobody made tires in his
    size anymore.
     
    nospam, Oct 15, 2012
    #17
  18. Peter Jason

    tony cooper Guest

    On Mon, 15 Oct 2012 11:07:42 -0700, nospam <>
    wrote:

    >In article <>, tony cooper
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >> There are many reasons a person may think that extending a contract is
    >> to their benefit. That's not being disputed. But, only a sucker
    >> thinks the phone is free.

    >
    >it's free if there is no additional charge.
    >
    >if you renew a contract, you get a new phone for free, unless you want
    >to pay extra for a fancier model.
    >
    >this is not rocket science.


    Can I take the "free" phone and not agree to the contract? Is it like
    a pen given away at a table at a benefits fair where the person at the
    table is trying to sell insurance?




    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Oct 15, 2012
    #18
  19. Peter Jason

    jdanield Guest

    Le 15/10/2012 20:07, nospam a écrit :

    > i know someone who had to sell his car because nobody made tires in his
    > size anymore.
    >

    I had the problem, I could change the wheels. I also know of people
    that make they own films, but I have to admit they did not do this for
    disk films (they made glass plates). However I *have* disk films and I
    could easily replace the used films with new films. But this is one
    time use, not fun.

    But I have Hp-41 calculators in good shape and I use them from time to
    time

    but I want only say that it's always possible (not always easy) to
    make an old device work. easy for mechanical (pretty easy for
    batteries), much more difficult for electronics

    jdd
     
    jdanield, Oct 16, 2012
    #19
  20. Peter Jason

    nospam Guest

    In article <k5j0o3$rjj$>, jdanield <> wrote:

    > > i know someone who had to sell his car because nobody made tires in his
    > > size anymore.
    > >

    > I had the problem, I could change the wheels. I also know of people
    > that make they own films, but I have to admit they did not do this for
    > disk films (they made glass plates). However I *have* disk films and I
    > could easily replace the used films with new films. But this is one
    > time use, not fun.


    not easily you can't. opening the disc case usually breaks it.

    > But I have Hp-41 calculators in good shape and I use them from time to
    > time


    the hp-41 takes normal n batteries.

    i have an older hp calculator that takes an hp custom battery pack that
    is no longer available.

    > but I want only say that it's always possible (not always easy) to
    > make an old device work. easy for mechanical (pretty easy for
    > batteries), much more difficult for electronics


    it's not always possible.
     
    nospam, Oct 16, 2012
    #20
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