a question in 070-216

Discussion in 'MCSE' started by =?Utf-8?B?enJz?=, Jan 15, 2004.

  1. a question met in 070-216, and I don't know how to solve it.

    the network enviorment is shown as exhibit: http://hrmstudent.html.533.net/problem.jpg

    routeris the only way to access internet. how should we configure a static route on server A , in order to make internet access available for windows 2000 pro

    fill the gaps

    Interface:
    Destination:
    Network mask:
    Gateway:
    Metric:

    and finally, would you please tell me why
    =?Utf-8?B?enJz?=, Jan 15, 2004
    #1
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  2. ----- zrs wrote: -----

    a question met in 070-216, and I don't know how to solve it.

    I have a question: Do you know the answer? If YES, you should just post it,
    so someone else could reverse engineer how the answer works.

    If NO, then how would you know that someone else or you got it right?


    Although it isn't entirely clear, I'm going to guess the following:

    Router gateway is 154.20.2.1 to the internet. It would have
    Destination 0.0.0.0 mask 0.0.0.0 gateway 154.20.2.1 metric 1
    somewhere in the route table


    I'm going to guess that Server B has one network card.
    IP 172.10.1.1
    Mask 255.255.255.0
    Gateway 172.10.1.2

    Via "route print" at a command prompt , you would get:
    Destination 0.0.0.0 Netmask 0.0.0.0 gateway 172.10.1.2 Interface 172.10.1.1 Metric 1

    This says for IP's not in the 172.10.1.x subnet, go to 172.10.1.2

    First part of the network done....


    Now, on Server B, if you go to the network card properties, you can add
    IP 192.168.1.1 mask 255.255.255.0. NOTE: you could add another netcard
    and achieve the same thing, but I notice Server A has an extra netcard depicted, so
    I am assuming that the IP address is just added. Now, route print will also reveal:
    Destination 192.168.1.0 Netmask 255.255.255.0 Gateway 192.168.1.1 Metric 1


    Server A has NIC2 configured with IP 192.168.1.2 mask 255.255.255.0 gateway 192.168.1.1
    If you did nothing else, a route print command would yield
    Destination 0.0.0.0 Netmask 0.0.0.0 Gateway 192.168.1.1 Metric 1

    In effect, this says that the rest of the internet can be found via 192.168.1.1.

    NIC1 has 172.10.2.1. I will assume mask 255.255.255.0 NO GATEWAY.
    The Win2K Pro machine would have an IP 172.10.2.x, mask 255.255.255.0 gateway 172.10.2.1
    A route print command would yield:
    Destination 0.0.0.0 Netmask 0.0.0.0 Gateway 172.10.2.1 Metric 1

    In effect, the Win2K machine can connect the rest of the internet via Server A.


    You know...you could get a couple of machines, put network cards in them and try all this for yourself....


    To prove this design, you could put a crossover cable between the Win2K Pro machine
    and NIC1 on Server A. NIC2 would go to a hub / switch that also connects Server B
    and the router. The router could just as well be another server with a dial up internet connection....

    Answer to your question:

    Interface: NIC2
    Destination: 0.0.0.0
    Network mask: 0.0.0.0
    Gateway: 192.168.1.1
    Metric: 1



    Now: Here is another way to make the same thing work.
    Let's assume that ALL network connections go to the same switch / hub.
    With all IPs starting with 172.10.x.y, change the netmask to 255.255.0.0
    The gateway for all but the router will be 172.10.1.2.

    Since the Win2K machine, configured with 172.10.2.y previously can
    now find 172.10.1.2 on the same subnet, it will have the following route:
    Destination 0.0.0.0 Netmask 0.0.0.0 Gateway 172.10.1.2 Metric 1

    Previous routes in the 192.168.1.x range referring to destination 0.0.0.0
    can now be removed.

    The Win2K machine, joined to the same ethernet device as the router,
    can now go to the internet via the router without going through either server.

    This is not the answer to the question, but is offered just so you can examine
    another scenario and hopefully gain further insight into how networking and
    subnetting can be applied.
    =?Utf-8?B?TWFya28=?=, Jan 15, 2004
    #2
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  3. I forgot to mention that none of this works
    without Network Address Translation (NAT)
    configured on the router.
    =?Utf-8?B?TWFya28=?=, Jan 16, 2004
    #3
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