A question before I replace a motherboard

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by JTJersey, May 26, 2005.

  1. JTJersey

    JTJersey Guest

    A co-worker had a friend try to fix a problem with his two year old
    Systemax WinXP system that was freezing at mostly random times. Except
    for drinking all his beer he accomplished little. It came to me. I booted
    it up and sure enough it would freeze while downloading patches or even
    while doing nothing. Swapped out the DDRAM with known good ones of the
    right type. No good. CPU fan was working fine, so I pulled the HeatSink
    and reseated it with good thermal compound. Still freezing. Tried to do a
    system restore using the Systemax included software. It frooze at 98%.
    Temporarily installed another hard drive, but had the same problem, so it
    wasn't the operating system causing it. Has to be hardware related.
    Swapped the 300Watt power supply for a 450Watt with no luck there either.
    The motherboard, a BIOSTAR MicroATX U8668D Socket 478 with the VIA
    chipset, has integrated Video and Sound so there were no cards to replace.
    As far as I can see that leaves only one conclusion, the motherboard has
    issues. Any thoughts on this appreciated.
    --
    Registered Linux User #267152
    JTJersey, May 26, 2005
    #1
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  2. JTJersey

    Spajky Guest

    On Thu, 26 May 2005 06:29:29 -0400, JTJersey
    <> wrote:

    >A co-worker had a friend try to fix a problem with his two year old
    >Systemax WinXP system that was freezing at mostly random times.

    <snipped>
    >As far as I can see that leaves only one conclusion, the motherboard has
    >issues. Any thoughts on this appreciated.


    could be also CD-rom dying ... disconnect it & try ...
    --
    Regards , SPAJKY ®
    mail addr. @ my site @ http://www.spajky.vze.com
    3rd Ann.: - "Tualatin OC-ed / BX-Slot1 / inaudible setup!"
    Spajky, May 27, 2005
    #2
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  3. JTJersey

    JTJersey Guest

    On Fri, 27 May 2005 04:48:26 +0200, Spajky wrote:

    > On Thu, 26 May 2005 06:29:29 -0400, JTJersey
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>A co-worker had a friend try to fix a problem with his two year old
    >>Systemax WinXP system that was freezing at mostly random times.

    > <snipped>
    >>As far as I can see that leaves only one conclusion, the motherboard has
    >>issues. Any thoughts on this appreciated.

    >
    > could be also CD-rom dying ... disconnect it & try ...


    Good thought, thanks. Yanked the power and IDE cable and I was hopeful at
    first because it ran ok for 30 minutes or so, but then the system locked
    up solid like before. Oh, well. Thanks again.
    --
    Registered Linux User #267152
    JTJersey, May 27, 2005
    #3
  4. "JTJersey" <> wrote in message
    news:0yhle.27062$...
    > A co-worker had a friend try to fix a problem with his two year old
    > Systemax WinXP system that was freezing at mostly random times. Except
    > for drinking all his beer he accomplished little. It came to me. I booted
    > it up and sure enough it would freeze while downloading patches or even
    > while doing nothing. Swapped out the DDRAM with known good ones of the
    > right type. No good. CPU fan was working fine, so I pulled the HeatSink
    > and reseated it with good thermal compound. Still freezing. Tried to do a
    > system restore using the Systemax included software. It frooze at 98%.
    > Temporarily installed another hard drive, but had the same problem, so it
    > wasn't the operating system causing it. Has to be hardware related.
    > Swapped the 300Watt power supply for a 450Watt with no luck there either.
    > The motherboard, a BIOSTAR MicroATX U8668D Socket 478 with the VIA
    > chipset, has integrated Video and Sound so there were no cards to replace.
    > As far as I can see that leaves only one conclusion, the motherboard has
    > issues. Any thoughts on this appreciated.



    Try going into the CMOS and disabling the video and sound. Add an AGP card
    you might have lying around (careful of the voltage if the board is fairly
    new) and see how it does. If it does alright, re-enable the sound and see if
    that's still OK. Use a process of elimination. I'm no expert... but I'd
    eliminate these before buying another board. You could get a video card that
    might be faster than the on-board for cheeper than a board using Pricewatch.
    Use a test card first... you could even try an old PCI video, but not with
    any fast apps unless you are sure the PCI card can handle it without giving
    you another, misleading error.
    Jess Fertudei, May 27, 2005
    #4
  5. JTJersey

    JTJersey Guest


    > Try going into the CMOS and disabling the video and sound. Add an AGP
    > card you might have lying around (careful of the voltage if the board is
    > fairly new) and see how it does. If it does alright, re-enable the sound
    > and see if that's still OK. Use a process of elimination. I'm no
    > expert... but I'd eliminate these before buying another board. You could
    > get a video card that might be faster than the on-board for cheeper than
    > a board using Pricewatch. Use a test card first... you could even try an
    > old PCI video, but not with any fast apps unless you are sure the PCI
    > card can handle it without giving you another, misleading error.


    Damn. Just when I think I've exhausted every option someone points out an
    embarrassingly obvious possibility. I do have several cards laying around
    that I can try. Thanks. Back to work I go.
    --
    Registered Linux User #267152
    JTJersey, May 28, 2005
    #5
  6. JTJersey

    me Guest

    "JTJersey" <> wrote in message
    news:DKNle.1523$...
    >
    >> Try going into the CMOS and disabling the video and sound. Add an AGP
    >> card you might have lying around (careful of the voltage if the board is
    >> fairly new) and see how it does. If it does alright, re-enable the sound
    >> and see if that's still OK. Use a process of elimination. I'm no
    >> expert... but I'd eliminate these before buying another board. You could
    >> get a video card that might be faster than the on-board for cheeper than
    >> a board using Pricewatch. Use a test card first... you could even try an
    >> old PCI video, but not with any fast apps unless you are sure the PCI
    >> card can handle it without giving you another, misleading error.

    >
    > Damn. Just when I think I've exhausted every option someone points out an
    > embarrassingly obvious possibility. I do have several cards laying around
    > that I can try. Thanks. Back to work I go.
    > --
    > Registered Linux User #267152
    >
    >

    I had a similar problem recently.I tried swapping out everything until the
    last thing I tried,which was the CPU,and since then it has been fine
    me, May 28, 2005
    #6
  7. JTJersey

    JTJersey Guest

    > Try going into the CMOS and disabling the video and sound. Add an AGP card
    > you might have lying around (careful of the voltage if the board is fairly
    > new) and see how it does. If it does alright, re-enable the sound and see if
    > that's still OK. Use a process of elimination. I'm no expert... but I'd
    > eliminate these before buying another board.


    No luck. Tried two separate AGP cards after disabling video and sound
    with the same results. Random freezes. Thanks again.
    --
    Registered Linux User #267152
    JTJersey, May 29, 2005
    #7
  8. JTJersey

    JTJersey Guest

    On Thu, 26 May 2005 06:29:29 -0400, JTJersey wrote:

    > A co-worker had a friend try to fix a problem with his two year old
    > Systemax WinXP system that was freezing at mostly random times.

    <snip>
    > The motherboard, a BIOSTAR MicroATX U8668D Socket 478 with the VIA
    > chipset, has integrated Video and Sound so there were no cards to
    > replace. As far as I can see that leaves only one conclusion, the
    > motherboard has issues.


    This really frosts me. That flimsy plastic bracket they bolt to the
    motherboard for the Socket 478 Heatsink/Fan had a crack at the bottom
    right side where the clip secures it. The Heatsink wasn't sitting on the
    CPU properly as a result and was overheating. The BIOS was showing a Temp
    of 60C while idle, which is high for a P4 2.2G, but the HS fan was working
    so I wrote it off as a crappy Heatsink/Fan combo. That is until the part
    came loose completely and the bottom Heat Sink clamp fell off. Replaced
    the bracket and all is working fine. I've been testing it for two days
    now and it appears the CPU didn't suffer any noticeable damage from
    overheating. Just thought I'd pass this along for future reference. Thanks
    to all who replied.
    --
    Registered Linux User #267152
    JTJersey, Jun 4, 2005
    #8
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