A good idea?

Discussion in 'MCDST' started by wriggles, Oct 5, 2004.

  1. wriggles

    wriggles Guest

    Hi all!

    Advice please.

    I have just finished a Multimedia computing degree which was split
    between Macromedia/Adobe stuff, Networking, Software Engineering,
    Hardware and HCI (more or less).

    My preference is to get into a Helpdesk/Support position so I am
    thinking about doing the MCDST as a way of getting my foot in the
    door. I am aware of the A+ and Network+ certs. but I'm not sure how
    much overlap there would be with what I already know e.g. OSI model,
    ATM, X.25, FDDI, Ethernet etc.......

    In UK courses cost 1800 pounds ($2500-3000) which is a lot.
    Self-study? Can it be done with no commercial experience? Or should I
    just wait for an entry-level job that will train and put me forward
    for these exams?

    I'm new to the IT employment lark but I would like to get a move on,
    especially as I'm rather mature at 34. (Am I climbing uphill already
    with this issue?)

    Please help clear this fog from my mind.

    Dave.
    wriggles, Oct 5, 2004
    #1
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  2. A few suggestions:
    1. Get some hands-on, even if that means offering your services to a local
    computer shop/technician for free, you *need* to see as many different
    problems, setups and issues as possible.
    2. If you're not already running Windows XP, get it and start installing,
    modifying, breaking and fixing it.
    3. Buy the self study books written by Microsoft Press.
    4. Ask questions, heaps of questions and hang out in the public XP
    newsgroups.
    5. Go to http://www.microsoft.com/seminar/default.mspx , on the left you'll
    see "Windows Clients" open that and then open the "Windows XP" link, heaps
    of on-line seminars, very good to watch and learn from!
    6. Also, go to http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/default.mspx , again, on
    the left are all the links to different areas, get into the Expert Zone,
    download whitepapers to fill gaps in your knowledge.
    7. Hands on
    8. Hands on (can't say this enough!)
    9. DO NOT download "braindumps" of any sort, you're *earning* a
    qualification, not rote learning, regurgitating memorised questions. If you
    must, use the practise exams recommended by Microsoft
    http://www.microsoft.com/learning/mcpexams/default.asp
    10. Hands on :)

    hope this helps you, welcome to IT!

    Wayne McGlinn
    Brisbane, Oz


    "wriggles" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi all!
    >
    > Advice please.
    >
    > I have just finished a Multimedia computing degree which was split
    > between Macromedia/Adobe stuff, Networking, Software Engineering,
    > Hardware and HCI (more or less).
    >
    > My preference is to get into a Helpdesk/Support position so I am
    > thinking about doing the MCDST as a way of getting my foot in the
    > door. I am aware of the A+ and Network+ certs. but I'm not sure how
    > much overlap there would be with what I already know e.g. OSI model,
    > ATM, X.25, FDDI, Ethernet etc.......
    >
    > In UK courses cost 1800 pounds ($2500-3000) which is a lot.
    > Self-study? Can it be done with no commercial experience? Or should I
    > just wait for an entry-level job that will train and put me forward
    > for these exams?
    >
    > I'm new to the IT employment lark but I would like to get a move on,
    > especially as I'm rather mature at 34. (Am I climbing uphill already
    > with this issue?)
    >
    > Please help clear this fog from my mind.
    >
    > Dave.
    Wayne McGlinn, Oct 6, 2004
    #2
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  3. wriggles

    wriggles Guest

    "Wayne McGlinn" <> wrote in message news:<>...
    > A few suggestions:
    > 1. Get some hands-on, even if that means offering your services to a local
    > computer shop/technician for free, you *need* to see as many different
    > problems, setups and issues as possible.
    > 2. If you're not already running Windows XP, get it and start installing,
    > modifying, breaking and fixing it.
    > 3. Buy the self study books written by Microsoft Press.
    > 4. Ask questions, heaps of questions and hang out in the public XP
    > newsgroups.
    > 5. Go to http://www.microsoft.com/seminar/default.mspx , on the left you'll
    > see "Windows Clients" open that and then open the "Windows XP" link, heaps
    > of on-line seminars, very good to watch and learn from!
    > 6. Also, go to http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/default.mspx , again, on
    > the left are all the links to different areas, get into the Expert Zone,
    > download whitepapers to fill gaps in your knowledge.
    > 7. Hands on
    > 8. Hands on (can't say this enough!)
    > 9. DO NOT download "braindumps" of any sort, you're *earning* a
    > qualification, not rote learning, regurgitating memorised questions. If you
    > must, use the practise exams recommended by Microsoft
    > http://www.microsoft.com/learning/mcpexams/default.asp
    > 10. Hands on :)
    >
    > hope this helps you, welcome to IT!
    >
    > Wayne McGlinn
    > Brisbane, Oz
    >
    >


    Thanks Wayne!

    Great advice.

    I've bought the book for the first part (of 2) of the MSDCT cert. I'll
    get trial version of XP to get started on. Thanks for the links too.

    I was thinking.....do you think I need any hands-on experience???

    Dave.
    wriggles, Oct 7, 2004
    #3
  4. Mate, hands on never hurt anyone :) Seeing how to configure permissions,
    shares and then seeing people test them is a much better way to learn than
    just from a book and your own pc. Plus, you're actually out and about
    getting yourself known, dual purpose eh?

    Wayne

    "wriggles" <> wrote in message > Thanks Wayne!
    >
    > Great advice.
    >
    > I've bought the book for the first part (of 2) of the MSDCT cert. I'll
    > get trial version of XP to get started on. Thanks for the links too.
    >
    > I was thinking.....do you think I need any hands-on experience???
    >
    > Dave.
    Wayne McGlinn, Oct 7, 2004
    #4
  5. wriggles

    SMR Guest

    If you have done the degree you say you shouldn't have
    any difficult in doing the MCDST.

    You can purchase for around £30 each both the 271 and 272
    self paced learning books (around 3inches thick each!).

    They each include a 120 evaluation copy of Windows XP
    Professional to load on to your pc and a test disk to
    test your progress.

    I am currently learning this way and as long as you have
    a computer you don't really need anything else. It
    depends on your determination to work on your own, if you
    find this difficulty there are study centres all over the
    country where you can take the courses. They are of 5
    days duration for both, one being 2 days and the other
    being 3! I can't believe that you can actually cover all
    that is needed in this time, judging by the size of the
    self paced learning books!! Maybe if you feel you need
    it you could do these courses in a study centre after
    going through the books. Horses for courses as they say!

    Good luck.
    >-----Original Message-----
    >Hi all!
    >
    >Advice please.
    >
    >I have just finished a Multimedia computing degree which

    was split
    >between Macromedia/Adobe stuff, Networking, Software

    Engineering,
    >Hardware and HCI (more or less).
    >
    >My preference is to get into a Helpdesk/Support position

    so I am
    >thinking about doing the MCDST as a way of getting my

    foot in the
    >door. I am aware of the A+ and Network+ certs. but I'm

    not sure how
    >much overlap there would be with what I already know

    e.g. OSI model,
    >ATM, X.25, FDDI, Ethernet etc.......
    >
    >In UK courses cost 1800 pounds ($2500-3000) which is a

    lot.
    >Self-study? Can it be done with no commercial

    experience? Or should I
    >just wait for an entry-level job that will train and put

    me forward
    >for these exams?
    >
    >I'm new to the IT employment lark but I would like to

    get a move on,
    >especially as I'm rather mature at 34. (Am I climbing

    uphill already
    >with this issue?)
    >
    >Please help clear this fog from my mind.
    >
    >Dave.
    >.
    >
    SMR, Oct 7, 2004
    #5
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