A few people photos

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Val Sharp, Aug 21, 2003.

  1. Val Sharp

    Val Sharp Guest

    If anyone has a spare moment to run a critical eye over a small
    gallery of people photos, it would be much appreciated.

    <http://www.pbase.com/valsharp/people>

    The first two were taken with my A40, and the rest with the Oly
    2100UZ, while out and about during the Edinburgh festival.


    (There's also some 'snaps' from the Festival Cavalcade at
    <http://www.pbase.com/valsharp/cavalcade>, if you like pipe bands and
    things :)


    --
    Regards,
    Val Sharp - Edinburgh
    Photo Galleries ... <www.pbase.com/valsharp>
    A40 Information ... <www.valsphotography.co.uk/information>
     
    Val Sharp, Aug 21, 2003
    #1
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  2. Val Sharp

    Graham Guest

    Val Sharp wrote:
    > If anyone has a spare moment to run a critical eye over a small
    > gallery of people photos, it would be much appreciated.
    >
    > <http://www.pbase.com/valsharp/people>


    I'm technically competent with a manual film camera.

    I can get the image I want under all sorts of lighting conditions with
    various different techniques. I can look at a landscape and "see" what I
    want to get from it. I can take good clear photographs of machinery,
    components, etc. I think it is fair to say my composition sometimes
    lacks a certain something, but I can make a camera do what I want it to
    do. I'm a competent, if not very imaginative amateur.

    I haven't got a clue about portraits.


    In that context, most of these photos don't do much for me, but I did
    like:

    <http://mikoga.image.pbase.com/u18/valsharp/small/20407563.P8111408e.jpg>
    The young (Greek?) chap in the black cap and waistcoat, I just like the
    look on his face.

    <http://mikilo.image.pbase.com/u17/valsharp/small/20298212.P8111386e.jpg>
    or <http://www.pbase.com/image/20298212>
    Two people in the shadows. I'm sorry, I can't quite define what it is I
    like here, which is probably why I can't do this sort of thing myself!
    Curiously I find the full size image, in which the people are more
    clearly visible, doesn't work as well for me, whereas the thumbnail,
    where they're lost in shadow, does.


    The real stand out for me though, was the bagpiper:
    <http://mikuna.image.pbase.com/u18/valsharp/small/20407570.P8111435e.jpg>
    or <http://www.pbase.com/image/20407570>

    If I could do this with a camera, I would be a happy man.
     
    Graham, Aug 21, 2003
    #2
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  3. Val Sharp

    Val Sharp Guest

    Graham, on 21/08/03 17:13, wrote:

    Thanks for the feedback Graham.

    > ...
    > In that context, most of these photos don't do much for me, but I did
    > like:
    >
    > <http://mikoga.image.pbase.com/u18/valsharp/small/20407563.P8111408e.jpg>
    > The young (Greek?) chap in the black cap and waistcoat, I just like the
    > look on his face.


    That look reminds me of the Mona Lisa[1], but his cuteness keeps
    getting in the way of my judgement of this photo :)


    > <http://mikilo.image.pbase.com/u17/valsharp/small/20298212.P8111386e.jpg>
    > or <http://www.pbase.com/image/20298212>
    > Two people in the shadows. I'm sorry, I can't quite define what it is I
    > like here, which is probably why I can't do this sort of thing myself!
    > Curiously I find the full size image, in which the people are more
    > clearly visible, doesn't work as well for me, whereas the thumbnail,
    > where they're lost in shadow, does.


    I think maybe I lightened this one too much - the original was
    slightly more shadowy, and I thought it had something. After
    processing, I couldn't quite put my finger on why it didn't seem so
    good. I think it was perhaps more intriguing when it was more shadowy.


    > The real stand out for me though, was the bagpiper:
    > <http://mikuna.image.pbase.com/u18/valsharp/small/20407570.P8111435e.jpg>
    > or <http://www.pbase.com/image/20407570>
    >
    > If I could do this with a camera, I would be a happy man.


    I did it with a camera ... and a bit of post-processing. Having
    almost, but not quite, desaturated it, I used 'Selective Color' in
    Photoshop to tweak the whites, neutrals (warmer) and blacks (cooler),
    and to give it a slight milkiness.


    [1]
    <http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=it&u=http://www.romagna.net/arsfactory/sapiens/gioconda.htm&prev=/search%3Fq%3Dgioconda%26start%3D10%26hl%3Den%26lr%3D%26ie%3DUTF-8%26oe%3Dutf-8%26sa%3DN>

    --
    Thanks again and regards,
    Val
     
    Val Sharp, Aug 21, 2003
    #3
  4. Dana Laffit <> wrote in news:3F451178.9E447455
    @yahoo.com:

    >> If anyone has a spare moment to run a critical eye over a small
    >> gallery of people photos, it would be much appreciated.
    >>

    >
    > I guess they look great, considering they are of strange people I don't
    > know and don't mean anything to me personally. At least animals are
    > cute to look at, people are just ugly to me.
    >
    > We have great software now that can remove people from photographs that
    > would otherwise be ruined because people were in the shots and many
    > magazines seem to show tips on how to remove people from photos with
    > programs like photoshop. Why someone would intentionally want

    people
    > in the photo (unless they are friends or family or some celebrity) I
    > don't know, but to each his own.



    I bet people don't let you close enough to take their picture,eh?




    --
    Tom Shellberg
    www.shellberg.com
     
    Tom Shellberg, Aug 21, 2003
    #4
  5. Val Sharp

    Val Sharp Guest

    Dana Laffit, on 21/08/03 20:40, wrote:


    > ... I am just curious if these people are people you know or just
    > strangers ...


    Total strangers

    > and why you find photographing people your thing ...


    It's not exactly 'my thing' - this is the first time I've concentrated
    on photos of individuals - trying to expand my horizons, broadening my
    experience. I've seen and admired street photography by other
    photographers, and I was trying to do something like that, though
    perhaps it's turned out more 'people' than 'street' photography.


    > when there are so
    > many programs and software that are now used to take people out of
    > photographs....


    I've done that too. I reckoned the bloke in
    <http://www.pbase.com/image/5583606> wasn't doing much for the photo,
    so I took him out <http://www.pbase.com/image/5452699>

    OTOH, I rather liked the effect of him in
    <http://www.pbase.com/image/5447473>, so there he remains.


    > ... I myself am overjoyed that I can not remove people from shots
    > that would otherwise have been ruined by some strange people I don't know
    > being in them.


    If a person is ruining a shot, then it's good to be able to take them
    out - just like power lines, or other spurious elements, but sometimes
    a person or two can also enhance a picture, add a bit of local colour,
    etc ...

    > Not that there is anything wrong with wanting to photograph people, and
    > millions of people do, but I just don't understand the fascination with people
    > and photographing them, unless it is a loved one or someone that means
    > something to you personally.


    Perhaps it's that a good photographer will be able to capture some
    sort of emotion in the subject(s), which would normally evoke some
    sort of response in the viewer. Fellow feeling?, shared humanity? ...
    or perhaps a sense of wonder at the strangeness of other people's
    lives? ... who knows ...

    (And there are many people who cannot read or respond to emotion in
    others, just as there are photographers who are unable to capture
    anything to which one might respond as a viewer.)

    A single photo can also arrest a viewers attention as it conjures up a
    whole story. (And notice that stories always contain 'people', even if
    it's only animals or other objects that have been anthropomorphized.)
    I'd like to be able to do that.

    Frankly, I'm not interested in other people's family snaps, and I
    doubt anyone would be interested in mine.


    > Just wondering why many people like to photograph people. Perhaps you
    > could just explain why you enjoy it so that I can learn and understand your
    > viewpoint. I am just curious.


    I've only been at doing photography for about a year, so my viewpoint
    is still very much that of a novice photographer.


    --
    Best regards,
    Val
     
    Val Sharp, Aug 21, 2003
    #5
  6. Val Sharp

    Dana Laffit Guest

    > > We have great software now that can remove people from photographs that
    > > would otherwise be ruined because people were in the shots and many
    > > magazines seem to show tips on how to remove people from photos with
    > > programs like photoshop. Why someone would intentionally want

    > people
    > > in the photo (unless they are friends or family or some celebrity) I
    > > don't know, but to each his own.

    >
    >
    > I bet people don't let you close enough to take their picture,eh?


    Seriously? I wouldn't have the gall to GET that close to some stranger and
    be rude enough to take their picture, but that is just me I guess. If
    someone took my picture, they would not leave with that camera. My
    likeness is my property and copyright and not in the public domain.

    As a rule, I like to stay as far away from humans as I can when in
    public. It is getting to the point even if you are standing still or
    sitting on a bench in a public area, humans will bump into you and not even
    think anything of it or apologize. And they are so loud and
    obnoxious. And of course many don't think anything of smoking around you
    as somehow if you are outdoors the smoke magically doesn't bother anyone else
    somehow.

    People suck.
     
    Dana Laffit, Aug 22, 2003
    #6
  7. > People suck.

    Sometimes...if you're lucky. :)
     
    Randall Ainsworth, Aug 22, 2003
    #7
  8. Val Sharp

    Todd Walker Guest

    In article <BB6A92C5.1550B%>,
    says...
    > How old are you? You know you should be in school, don't you?
    >


    I am guessing around 15 or 16. That's usually the "I'd be happy if it
    weren't for people" stage. Instead they just decide to wear all black.

    --
    ________________________________
    Todd Walker
    http://twalker.d2g.com
    Canon 10D:
    http://twalker.d2g.com/canon10d
    My Digital Photography Weblog:
    http://twalker.d2g.com/dpblog.htm
    _________________________________
     
    Todd Walker, Aug 22, 2003
    #8
  9. Val Sharp <> wrote in message news:<xK51b.9997$9.net>...
    > If anyone has a spare moment to run a critical eye over a small
    > gallery of people photos, it would be much appreciated.
    >
    > <http://www.pbase.com/valsharp/people>


    These aren't bad. The one of three girls all looking down, facing away
    from the camera--what's the point? The violin player shots look kinda
    nice. It's hard to fame this kind of photo, and you did a fine job.


    >
    > The first two were taken with my A40, and the rest with the Oly
    > 2100UZ, while out and about during the Edinburgh festival.
    >
    >
    > (There's also some 'snaps' from the Festival Cavalcade at
    > <http://www.pbase.com/valsharp/cavalcade>, if you like pipe bands and
    > things :)



    These have too much depth of field. I like best images that direct me
    somewhere, to the subkject. These are too confusing because there's no
    single point of interest--a common problem for beginners.
     
    Michael Scarpitti, Aug 22, 2003
    #9
  10. Val Sharp

    Todd Walker Guest

    In article <>, says...
    > As a rule, I like to stay as far away from humans as I can when in
    > public. It is getting to the point even if you are standing still or
    > sitting on a bench in a public area, humans will bump into you and not even
    > think anything of it or apologize. And they are so loud and
    > obnoxious. And of course many don't think anything of smoking around you
    > as somehow if you are outdoors the smoke magically doesn't bother anyone else
    > somehow.
    >


    Interesting how you insist on referring to humans as "they."

    If this is nothing more than teen angst, you are forgiven. If it is a
    ploy to see what kind of reactions you will get from others, fine. Enjoy
    your little social experiment. If it is indeed a deep seeded emotional
    problem, perhaps you should seek help.

    --
    ________________________________
    Todd Walker
    http://twalker.d2g.com
    Canon 10D:
    http://twalker.d2g.com/canon10d
    My Digital Photography Weblog:
    http://twalker.d2g.com/dpblog.htm
    _________________________________
     
    Todd Walker, Aug 22, 2003
    #10
  11. Val Sharp

    Val Sharp Guest

    It's obvious, Dana, that you know you're lacking something that most
    other folk seem to have, and you're curious about it, even while at
    the same time dismissing it.

    The rest is just noise ...


    --
    Best regards,
    Val
     
    Val Sharp, Aug 22, 2003
    #11
  12. Val Sharp

    Guest

    Archived from Val Sharp <> on Thu, 21 Aug 2003 16:35:35
    +0100:

    >If anyone has a spare moment to run a critical eye over a small
    >gallery of people photos, it would be much appreciated.


    Most are poor, the best are ordinary. But hey, if you like them, keep on
    clickin'.
    mailto: clix.at.xeropixdotcom
     
    , Aug 22, 2003
    #12
  13. Val Sharp

    Val Sharp Guest

    , on 22/08/03 13:09, wrote:


    > Archived from Val Sharp <> on Thu, 21 Aug 2003 16:35:35
    > +0100:
    >
    >
    >>If anyone has a spare moment to run a critical eye over a small
    >>gallery of people photos, it would be much appreciated.

    >
    >
    > Most are poor, the best are ordinary. But hey, if you like them, keep on
    > clickin'.
    > mailto: clix.at.xeropixdotcom



    I suspect you may be right, but with such a curt response, how am I to
    know if you're giving an honest and expert opinion, or just being mean?


    --
    Regards,
    Val
     
    Val Sharp, Aug 22, 2003
    #13
  14. Val Sharp

    Jean Gupta Guest

    > > As a rule, I like to stay as far away from humans as I can when in
    > > public. It is getting to the point even if you are standing still or
    > > sitting on a bench in a public area, humans will bump into you and not even
    > > think anything of it or apologize. And they are so loud and
    > > obnoxious. And of course many don't think anything of smoking around you
    > > as somehow if you are outdoors the smoke magically doesn't bother anyone else
    > > somehow.

    >
    > Interesting how you insist on referring to humans as "they."
    >
    > If this is nothing more than teen angst, you are forgiven. If it is a
    > ploy to see what kind of reactions you will get from others, fine. Enjoy
    > your little social experiment. If it is indeed a deep seeded emotional
    > problem, perhaps you should seek help.


    I don't think you realize that you proved her point with your response. :)
     
    Jean Gupta, Aug 22, 2003
    #14
  15. Val Sharp

    Bryce Guest

    Who gives a shit if they approve of it or not?

    It doesn't matter.
     
    Bryce, Aug 22, 2003
    #15
  16. Val Sharp

    Dana Laffit Guest

    > > ... The one of three girls all looking down, facing away
    > > from the camera--what's the point? ...

    >
    > Actually, I'm quite pleased with the composition of that one,
    > especially in b&w form ...


    Not pleased enough, you asked for people's comments on them.

    > do photos only have a point if the subject
    > is facing the camera?


    That is an opinion, so there is no right or wrong answer, but many of us would say looking down and
    facing away from the camera is more than just not looking into the lens and saying cheese.


    > > These have too much depth of field. I like best images that direct me
    > > somewhere, to the subkject.


    You can never have too much depth of field in my opinion. Perhaps where the photographer wants to
    direct my attention is not what I would be interested in looking at in the photo.

    > These are too confusing because there's no
    > > single point of interest--a common problem for beginners.


    That is only a problem for big ego photographers who like to think of themselves as artists, rather
    than someone with a camera. Why not just put a big circle around an item or paint a big arrow on it
    so that people that don't know what to look at in a photo (like yourself) don't have to be so confused
    at the complicated process of looking at a photo and knowing what to look at.
     
    Dana Laffit, Aug 22, 2003
    #16
  17. Val Sharp

    Dana Laffit Guest

    > Who gives a shit if they approve of it or not?
    > It doesn't matter.


    That's what I think, and why I would never post my photos up and ask
    some losers on a newsgroup what they thought of them. Pictures of
    things depend on personal tastes and opinions, not facts that can be
    debated, so putting up some photos and asking people here to comment on
    them is like asking someone to insult your mother.
     
    Dana Laffit, Aug 22, 2003
    #17
  18. Val Sharp

    Bryce Guest

    Good point.

    I think you are right. Because, you put a bad picture up of a naked thin
    chick (not many of them left in the states) and all the losers will say,
    "hey, great picture!". Because they are thinking with their dicks or
    something. But then you put a great picture up of a brick wall, but, you
    know, it's a brick wall.
     
    Bryce, Aug 22, 2003
    #18
  19. Val Sharp

    Bryce Guest

    Well Dana. You sound different in this one than in the 300D one. I've gotta
    give you that.
     
    Bryce, Aug 22, 2003
    #19
  20. Val Sharp

    Bryce Guest

    They'd get a good ass kickin' if they did that.
     
    Bryce, Aug 22, 2003
    #20
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