A Different Kind of Cisco Question

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by Erich Trowbridge, Aug 9, 2004.

  1. When I was prepping for the CCIE, a friend of mine used to always ****
    with my lab configuration, attempting to jack things up in a manner
    from which I could not recover. Once, he replaced the IOS of a 2500
    router with a 4MB mpg file, and renamed the file to that of a valid
    IOS image. I spent 30 minutes trying to get the "image" to boot.

    What are some clever things that you've found you can do to sabotage
    Cisco Networks? I am particularly interested in tricks that leave
    either a small configuration footprint, or no footprint at all. Clever
    protocol tricks are particularly amusing.

    'no ip routing' will generally keep noobs busy for awhile. ;)

    Erich Trowbridge
    CCIE #4653
     
    Erich Trowbridge, Aug 9, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Erich Trowbridge

    none Guest

    I have my doubts you're a CCIE if you have to ask!!!!

    "Erich Trowbridge" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > When I was prepping for the CCIE, a friend of mine used to always ****
    > with my lab configuration, attempting to jack things up in a manner
    > from which I could not recover. Once, he replaced the IOS of a 2500
    > router with a 4MB mpg file, and renamed the file to that of a valid
    > IOS image. I spent 30 minutes trying to get the "image" to boot.
    >
    > What are some clever things that you've found you can do to sabotage
    > Cisco Networks? I am particularly interested in tricks that leave
    > either a small configuration footprint, or no footprint at all. Clever
    > protocol tricks are particularly amusing.
    >
    > 'no ip routing' will generally keep noobs busy for awhile. ;)
    >
    > Erich Trowbridge
    > CCIE #4653
     
    none, Aug 9, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. "Erich Trowbridge" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > When I was prepping for the CCIE, a friend of mine used to always ****
    > with my lab configuration, attempting to jack things up in a manner
    > from which I could not recover. Once, he replaced the IOS of a 2500
    > router with a 4MB mpg file, and renamed the file to that of a valid
    > IOS image. I spent 30 minutes trying to get the "image" to boot.
    >
    > What are some clever things that you've found you can do to sabotage
    > Cisco Networks? I am particularly interested in tricks that leave
    > either a small configuration footprint, or no footprint at all. Clever
    > protocol tricks are particularly amusing.
    >
    > 'no ip routing' will generally keep noobs busy for awhile. ;)
    >
    > Erich Trowbridge
    > CCIE #4653


    Playing with the config register is always a good larf, as is dropping the
    cam aging timers on switches.
     
    Buzz Lightbeer, Aug 9, 2004
    #3
  4. Erich Trowbridge

    Hansang Bae Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    > When I was prepping for the CCIE, a friend of mine used to always ****
    > with my lab configuration, attempting to jack things up in a manner
    > from which I could not recover. Once, he replaced the IOS of a 2500
    > router with a 4MB mpg file, and renamed the file to that of a valid
    > IOS image. I spent 30 minutes trying to get the "image" to boot.
    > What are some clever things that you've found you can do to sabotage
    > Cisco Networks? I am particularly interested in tricks that leave
    > either a small configuration footprint, or no footprint at all. Clever
    > protocol tricks are particularly amusing.
    > 'no ip routing' will generally keep noobs busy for awhile. ;)


    1) routing loops as a result of summary and default routes are good.
    2) Mismatched MTU size on serial links that break OSPF.
    3) Mismatched IPSec crypto ACLs.
    4) dialer maps w/o the key word "broadcast"
    5) BGP timers that are shorter than IGP timers.
    6) OSPF next-hops that are external types are fun to troubleshoot.

    Of course, changing prompts, config-registers and the like are not
    included as they are too easy.


    --

    hsb

    "Somehow I imagined this experience would be more rewarding" Calvin
    *************** USE ROT13 TO SEE MY EMAIL ADDRESS ****************
    ********************************************************************
    Due to the volume of email that I receive, I may not not be able to
    reply to emails sent to my account. Please post a followup instead.
    ********************************************************************
     
    Hansang Bae, Aug 10, 2004
    #4
  5. Erich Trowbridge

    VolatileAcid Guest

    Agreed, just another lamer looking to mess with someone elses router!!

    "none" <> wrote in message
    news:OgTRc.376$...
    >I have my doubts you're a CCIE if you have to ask!!!!
    >
    > "Erich Trowbridge" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> When I was prepping for the CCIE, a friend of mine used to always ****
    >> with my lab configuration, attempting to jack things up in a manner
    >> from which I could not recover. Once, he replaced the IOS of a 2500
    >> router with a 4MB mpg file, and renamed the file to that of a valid
    >> IOS image. I spent 30 minutes trying to get the "image" to boot.
    >>
    >> What are some clever things that you've found you can do to sabotage
    >> Cisco Networks? I am particularly interested in tricks that leave
    >> either a small configuration footprint, or no footprint at all. Clever
    >> protocol tricks are particularly amusing.
    >>
    >> 'no ip routing' will generally keep noobs busy for awhile. ;)
    >>
    >> Erich Trowbridge
    >> CCIE #4653

    >
    >
    >
     
    VolatileAcid, Aug 10, 2004
    #5
  6. "VolatileAcid" <Volatileacid squigly_a gmail fullstop com> wrote in message news:<41186233$0$7129$>...
    > Agreed, just another lamer looking to mess with someone elses router!!
    >


    Idiots!!

    Just because someone has a CCIE doesn't mean they know everything
    about everything! There's no harm in asking for advice and help from
    others. I have no Cisco certification, just many years of network
    experience. I often ask others for advice and on many occasions I have
    asked CCIE's for answers to questions and they don't know the answer.

    If you guys think that you don't need to ask others for help and
    advice, then you are either the best network experts that have ever
    walked the earth or idiots. I've already made my choice.

    Pete
     
    Pete Mainwaring, Aug 10, 2004
    #6
  7. Erich Trowbridge

    none Guest

    "Pete Mainwaring" wrote in message

    <snip>
    >
    > If you guys think that you don't need to ask others for help and
    > advice, then you are either the best network experts that have ever
    > walked the earth or idiots. I've already made my choice.
    >
    > Pete


    <snip>

    Who said "we don't need to ask others for help". The way the OP phrased the
    question, it was obvious he wasn't who he said he was.

    Yes - we agree - you are an Idiot! Especially if you can't tell a troll
    pretending to be someone else.
     
    none, Aug 10, 2004
    #7
  8. Erich Trowbridge

    VolatileAcid Guest

    Pete, you're a loser. In your own words, you've got no certifications
    yourself, haven't attempted any, and IMHO haven't even got the slightest
    understanding of what it takes to even get a CCNA! because if you had,
    you'd realise what it takes to be a CCIE !

    The biggest giveaway in 'Erich Trowbridge's' post was his line

    "'no ip routing' will generally keep noobs busy for awhile. ;)" ...

    NO IP ROUTING !!!! is that the best a CCIE could come up with... ah come on,
    pull the other one. You're so gullible it's unreal.

    And I even question your silly claim "I often ask others for advice and on
    many occasions I have asked CCIE's for answers to questions and they don't
    know the answer"..

    i'd like you to prove me wrong ? find me a post of your on google that
    proves otherwise.. actually..forget it.. I know your answer allready, you
    didn't ask anyone on usenet! how appropriate!!!






    "Pete Mainwaring" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "VolatileAcid" <Volatileacid squigly_a gmail fullstop com> wrote in
    > message news:<41186233$0$7129$>...
    >> Agreed, just another lamer looking to mess with someone elses router!!
    >>

    >
    > Idiots!!
    >
    > Just because someone has a CCIE doesn't mean they know everything
    > about everything! There's no harm in asking for advice and help from
    > others. I have no Cisco certification, just many years of network
    > experience. I often ask others for advice and on many occasions I have
    > asked CCIE's for answers to questions and they don't know the answer.
    >
    > If you guys think that you don't need to ask others for help and
    > advice, then you are either the best network experts that have ever
    > walked the earth or idiots. I've already made my choice.
    >
    > Pete
     
    VolatileAcid, Aug 10, 2004
    #8
  9. Erich Trowbridge

    John Agosta Guest

    "VolatileAcid" <Volatileacid squigly_a gmail fullstop com> wrote in message
    news:41190090$0$193$...
    > Pete, you're a loser. In your own words, you've got no certifications
    > yourself, haven't attempted any, and IMHO haven't even got the slightest
    > understanding of what it takes to even get a CCNA! because if you had,
    > you'd realise what it takes to be a CCIE !
    >
    > The biggest giveaway in 'Erich Trowbridge's' post was his line
    >
    > "'no ip routing' will generally keep noobs busy for awhile. ;)" ...
    >
    > NO IP ROUTING !!!! is that the best a CCIE could come up with... ah come

    on,
    > pull the other one. You're so gullible it's unreal.
    >
    > And I even question your silly claim "I often ask others for advice and on
    > many occasions I have asked CCIE's for answers to questions and they don't
    > know the answer"..
    >
    > i'd like you to prove me wrong ? find me a post of your on google that
    > proves otherwise.. actually..forget it.. I know your answer allready, you
    > didn't ask anyone on usenet! how appropriate!!!
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "Pete Mainwaring" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > "VolatileAcid" <Volatileacid squigly_a gmail fullstop com> wrote in
    > > message news:<41186233$0$7129$>...
    > >> Agreed, just another lamer looking to mess with someone elses router!!
    > >>

    > >
    > > Idiots!!
    > >
    > > Just because someone has a CCIE doesn't mean they know everything
    > > about everything! There's no harm in asking for advice and help from
    > > others. I have no Cisco certification, just many years of network
    > > experience. I often ask others for advice and on many occasions I have
    > > asked CCIE's for answers to questions and they don't know the answer.
    > >
    > > If you guys think that you don't need to ask others for help and
    > > advice, then you are either the best network experts that have ever
    > > walked the earth or idiots. I've already made my choice.
    > >
    > > Pete


    I see that "volotile" is a good handle to use.
    Mr. Acid, you really need to simmer down with the name calling.
    Yes, you're an 'eager beaver,' but please a little courtesy....

    -ja
     
    John Agosta, Aug 11, 2004
    #9
  10. "John Agosta" <j_agosta@remove_wideopenwest.kom> wrote in message news:<>...
    > "VolatileAcid" <Volatileacid squigly_a gmail fullstop com> wrote in message
    > news:41190090$0$193$...
    > > Pete, you're a loser. In your own words, you've got no certifications
    > > yourself, haven't attempted any, and IMHO haven't even got the slightest
    > > understanding of what it takes to even get a CCNA! because if you had,
    > > you'd realise what it takes to be a CCIE !
    > >
    > > The biggest giveaway in 'Erich Trowbridge's' post was his line
    > >
    > > "'no ip routing' will generally keep noobs busy for awhile. ;)" ...
    > >
    > > NO IP ROUTING !!!! is that the best a CCIE could come up with... ah come

    > on,
    > > pull the other one. You're so gullible it's unreal.
    > >
    > > And I even question your silly claim "I often ask others for advice and on
    > > many occasions I have asked CCIE's for answers to questions and they don't
    > > know the answer"..
    > >
    > > i'd like you to prove me wrong ? find me a post of your on google that
    > > proves otherwise.. actually..forget it.. I know your answer allready, you
    > > didn't ask anyone on usenet! how appropriate!!!
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >

    >
    > I see that "volotile" is a good handle to use.
    > Mr. Acid, you really need to simmer down with the name calling.
    > Yes, you're an 'eager beaver,' but please a little courtesy....
    >
    > -ja


    Whoa ho! Volatile Acid certainly is a good handle!!

    I really really shouldn't get drawn into this, but here goes.....

    I accept that I went over the top with the tone of my first post in
    this thread. Sorry for that.

    The first reply in the thread said "I have my doubts you're a CCIE if
    you have to ask!!!!"

    I wasn't questioning whether Erich really is a CCIE or not, and I
    wasn't terribly interested . That wasn't the point of my post. That
    reply says to me that "if you are a CCIE, you shouldn't need to ask",
    but yes I suppose it could simply be that he was questioning whether
    Erich was a CCIE - it was the "if you have to ask" part that prompted
    my post.

    I also wasn't knocking CCIE's. Anyone who has achieved the CCIE
    qualification has my utmost admiration. I was just saying that just
    because someone has a CCIE, it doesn't mean they know everything -
    hence my point about asking others when you need to. I know exactly
    what is entailed in getting your CCIE - I have two very good friends
    who are both CCIE's. (Incidentally, I have also worked with both of
    them and both say that I could get a CCNA with no problem at all - one
    of them teaches CCNA too). I've been around a long time and am getting
    somewhat long in the tooth (I've been in Data Comms and Networking
    since 1976), and I have never needed to get the Cisco qualifications
    to get work, so I simply haven't bothered. If I did need to, I would
    work my way through the qualifications. I am reasonably confident that
    I could get my CCIE.

    Most of my questions that CCIE's have been unable to answer have been
    when I have been working in the same place as the CCIE was (therefore
    no need to post here), and most of those CCIEs were Cisco employees.
    Ones that I can recall off the top of my head include questions that I
    had when I was working on WLAN implementations related to APs, LEAP
    (this was a while ago now), and Cisco ACS authentication with WinNT
    domains and RSA SecurID ACE server. Other questions have included
    things like BSTUN timers when I was working on a large network that
    used BSTUN extensively. Some were complex questions and quite frankly
    I would have been very surprised and impressed if the people I asked
    had known the answers off the top of their heads, CCIEs or not. We did
    get answers in most cases when they were referred to other people back
    at the Cisco offices, who were presumably CCIEs too :), or in some
    cases the Cisco TAC (apart from one of the BSTUN questions which we
    never got a definitive answer to - it was to do with changing the
    keep-alive timers because they were activating ISDN lines to remote
    sites if you really want to know - but I don't suppose you do!).

    Oh - and I never got an answer to my post about "Default Netmask on
    VPN Client" back in February.

    If this being a loser, then yes, ok I agree.

    Pete
     
    Pete Mainwaring, Aug 11, 2004
    #10
  11. Erich Trowbridge

    VolatileAcid Guest

    I apologise for questioning your credentials.

    sorry.
     
    VolatileAcid, Aug 11, 2004
    #11
  12. I think something to take into account here also is that sometimes, when
    people know a lot about a subject it might be easy to look at something they
    think is too easy when in fact it could be too hard. so sometimes, asking
    for someone else's opinion is the next best thing.

    I have sometimes thought of questions for my team at work and thought that
    the answer would be easy but in fact the answer for most has been near
    impossible, so defeating the object of the exercise.

    Sometimes, asking someone who is new to it all would be best because you can
    ask that person what they found hard and then can put that into action with
    the prospective newbie's

    But, at the end off the day, we all need to ask questions and as someone
    said in one of the posts, no one knows all the answers. If they did, they
    wouldn't need to come in here.




    "Hansang Bae" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In article <>,
    > says...
    >> When I was prepping for the CCIE, a friend of mine used to always ****
    >> with my lab configuration, attempting to jack things up in a manner
    >> from which I could not recover. Once, he replaced the IOS of a 2500
    >> router with a 4MB mpg file, and renamed the file to that of a valid
    >> IOS image. I spent 30 minutes trying to get the "image" to boot.
    >> What are some clever things that you've found you can do to sabotage
    >> Cisco Networks? I am particularly interested in tricks that leave
    >> either a small configuration footprint, or no footprint at all. Clever
    >> protocol tricks are particularly amusing.
    >> 'no ip routing' will generally keep noobs busy for awhile. ;)

    >
    > 1) routing loops as a result of summary and default routes are good.
    > 2) Mismatched MTU size on serial links that break OSPF.
    > 3) Mismatched IPSec crypto ACLs.
    > 4) dialer maps w/o the key word "broadcast"
    > 5) BGP timers that are shorter than IGP timers.
    > 6) OSPF next-hops that are external types are fun to troubleshoot.
    >
    > Of course, changing prompts, config-registers and the like are not
    > included as they are too easy.
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    > hsb
    >
    > "Somehow I imagined this experience would be more rewarding" Calvin
    > *************** USE ROT13 TO SEE MY EMAIL ADDRESS ****************
    > ********************************************************************
    > Due to the volume of email that I receive, I may not not be able to
    > reply to emails sent to my account. Please post a followup instead.
    > ********************************************************************
     
    slipstream_242, Aug 12, 2004
    #12
  13. "VolatileAcid" <Volatileacid squigly_a gmail fullstop com> wrote in message news:<411a65b4$0$206$>...
    > I apologise for questioning your credentials.
    >
    > sorry.


    No prob (now that we have both calmed down!)

    Pete
     
    Pete Mainwaring, Aug 12, 2004
    #13
  14. I asked a perfectly wonderful question and got not one decent answer.
    Typical usenet.

    The problem with IOS is that it's an appliance. And it's very east to
    blow things away and recreate them. So hosing things up beyond all
    recognition is difficult.

    'no ip routing' is a wonderful snafu for a large configuration for the
    following reasons.

    1) leaves a small configuration footprint
    2) breaks routing protocols and ip forwarding
    3) leaves routing protocol configuration intact

    So answer my question n00bs. How do you gurus jack up routers beyond
    all recognition? k? gg. thx no re.

    BTW, if you lamers have a CCO login (doubtful), you can see for
    yourselves what certs i do or don't have. Give Kathy Saccenti in San
    Ho a smooch for me if you get up the nuts to go fail the lab like a
    man.

    https://tools.cisco.com/CCIE/Schedule_Lab/CCIEOnline/CCIEOnline?verify

    erich
    trowbridge
    ccie #4653
     
    Erich Trowbridge, Aug 13, 2004
    #14
  15. Doesn't the CAM just relearn quick?

    erich

    >
    > Playing with the config register is always a good larf, as is dropping the
    > cam aging timers on switches.
     
    Erich Trowbridge, Aug 13, 2004
    #15
  16. > 1) routing loops as a result of summary and default routes are good.
    > 2) Mismatched MTU size on serial links that break OSPF.
    > 3) Mismatched IPSec crypto ACLs.
    > 4) dialer maps w/o the key word "broadcast"
    > 5) BGP timers that are shorter than IGP timers.
    > 6) OSPF next-hops that are external types are fun to troubleshoot.


    These are clever. Nice.
    erich
     
    Erich Trowbridge, Aug 13, 2004
    #16
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. =?Utf-8?B?c2hhZG8yODI=?=

    Router problems of a different kind

    =?Utf-8?B?c2hhZG8yODI=?=, Jan 31, 2005, in forum: Wireless Networking
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    567
    Malke
    Jan 31, 2005
  2. Tony Sperling

    A different kind of Language Question.

    Tony Sperling, Dec 7, 2005, in forum: Windows 64bit
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    425
    Tony Sperling
    Dec 8, 2005
  3. John

    somewhat different kind of network question

    John, May 7, 2007, in forum: Wireless Networking
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    353
  4. John

    somewhat different kind of network question

    John, May 7, 2007, in forum: Wireless Networking
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    363
    =?Utf-8?B?cGF1bGlidXM=?=
    May 8, 2007
  5. saiyen2002

    beginner bgp different kind of routes

    saiyen2002, Apr 7, 2010, in forum: Cisco
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    450
    saiyen2002
    Apr 7, 2010
Loading...

Share This Page