95MP imager to be launched into space......

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by David J Taylor, Feb 20, 2009.

  1. David J Taylor, Feb 20, 2009
    #1
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  2. David J Taylor

    J. Clarke Guest

    David J Taylor wrote:
    > 95MP imager, 3+ years photographing the same area of the sky, every
    > six seconds....
    >
    > http://kepler.nasa.gov/
    >
    > http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/kepler/main/index.html
    >
    > Largest telescope ever for space work - looking for planets. Get the
    > Press Kit (3MB PDF) if you are interested, for the description of the
    > optics and the detectors - on a curved focal plane.
    >
    > http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/314268main_Kepler_presskit_2-19_print.pdf


    Not the largest ever. It has a .95 meter aperture with a 1.4 meter mirror,
    compared to 2.4 meter for the Hubble. Kepler has a very specific and
    limited mission, to continually image a segment of the sky for four years
    looking for very tiny variations in star brightness that indicate transits
    of relatively small planets. The large sensor is there to allow its entire
    field of view to be monitored continually.

    Incidentally the smallest extasolar planet yet discovered was discovered
    with the 1.8 meter telescope at the Mount John University Observatory in New
    Zealand.
    J. Clarke, Feb 20, 2009
    #2
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  3. David J Taylor

    ASAAR Guest

    On Fri, 20 Feb 2009 09:28:16 GMT, David J Taylor wrote:

    > 95MP imager, 3+ years photographing the same area of the sky, every six
    > seconds....
    >
    > http://kepler.nasa.gov/
    >
    > http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/kepler/main/index.html
    >
    > Largest telescope ever for space work - looking for planets. Get the
    > Press Kit (3MB PDF) if you are interested, for the description of the
    > optics and the detectors - on a curved focal plane.
    >
    > http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/314268main_Kepler_presskit_2-19_print.pdf


    What a waste of money. Is there room on board for our talented
    anti-DSLR sock puppet troll? With just his little CHDK enabled
    Powershot, he'll be able to produce much better images, some of
    which will be sure to eventually stand beside his other award
    winning photos.
    ASAAR, Feb 20, 2009
    #3
  4. bugbear wrote:
    > David J Taylor wrote:
    >> 95MP imager

    >
    > Still won't be as good as film ;-)
    >
    > BugBear


    ... just the problem of sending the film back to the labs for processing.

    <G>

    David
    David J Taylor, Feb 20, 2009
    #4
  5. David J Taylor

    J. Clarke Guest

    David J Taylor wrote:
    > bugbear wrote:
    >> David J Taylor wrote:
    >>> 95MP imager

    >>
    >> Still won't be as good as film ;-)
    >>
    >> BugBear

    >
    > .. just the problem of sending the film back to the labs for
    > processing.


    Actually that particular job couldn't be done by film, since it's a
    photometry job, not an imaging job.
    J. Clarke, Feb 20, 2009
    #5
  6. Rich wrote:
    > bugbear <bugbear@trim_papermule.co.uk_trim> wrote in
    > news::
    >
    >> David J Taylor wrote:
    >>> 95MP imager

    >>
    >> Still won't be as good as film ;-)
    >>
    >> BugBear

    >
    > The astronomical community dumped film before anyone else did, for
    > good reason: Reciprocity failure. Digital sensors don't suffer from
    > it.


    This imager is taking six-second exposures continuously for three or more
    years....precision is the key to detecting the small variations of light
    resulting from a planet crossing a star's disk.

    David
    David J Taylor, Feb 21, 2009
    #6
  7. "David J Taylor" <-this-bit.nor-this.co.uk>
    wrote:

    >.. just the problem of sending the film back to the labs for processing.


    In the 60's, the first spy satellites returned their film to earth by ejecting a
    capsule that was caught by an airplane. Really.

    The capsule had a parachute and the airplane towed a trapeze-like thing that
    snagged the chute. I assume it worked at least some of the time. It's no
    wonder they went digital as soon as they could. -- Doug
    Douglas Johnson, Feb 21, 2009
    #7
  8. Douglas Johnson wrote:
    > "David J Taylor"
    > <-this-bit.nor-this.co.uk> wrote:
    >
    >> .. just the problem of sending the film back to the labs for
    >> processing.

    >
    > In the 60's, the first spy satellites returned their film to earth by
    > ejecting a capsule that was caught by an airplane. Really.


    Yes, I know.

    > The capsule had a parachute and the airplane towed a trapeze-like
    > thing that snagged the chute. I assume it worked at least some of
    > the time. It's no wonder they went digital as soon as they could.
    > -- Doug


    Did they ever use analog transmisisons? I recall that some of the early
    satellites used TV cameras.

    David
    David J Taylor, Feb 21, 2009
    #8
  9. Rich wrote:
    []
    > Also note, many individual sensors with HUGE pixels instead of just
    > 4-8 high pixel count devices. As for its size, there are already 1.4
    > gigapixel astronomical imagers on ground-based telescopes.


    I was wondering what the pixel size was, but didn't read enough to find
    out. Remember that anything launched into space was probably designed
    with technology that's 5-10 years old, so I wouldn't expect it to compare
    with the latest ground-based instruments. Did you like the curved focal
    plane?

    Cheers,
    David
    David J Taylor, Feb 22, 2009
    #9
  10. David J Taylor

    ASAAR Guest

    On Sun, 22 Feb 2009 03:01:16 -0600, Ron Hunter wrote:

    >> Also note, many individual sensors with HUGE pixels instead of just 4-8
    >> high pixel count devices. As for its size, there are already 1.4
    >> gigapixel astronomical imagers on ground-based telescopes.

    >
    > I suppose there is no real reason, other than cost, why multiple sensors
    > can't be 'ganged' in a device, which I suspect is how the astronomical
    > instruments get gigapixel sizes.


    Your fav. company has been there, done that! :)
    Aren't some (all?) current FF sensors stitched? Also :

    > Kodak is promoting its custom CMOS sensor capabilities including large stitched sensors ...


    http://luminous-landscape.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=27013


    > A good place to start is to mention who DALSA currently makes
    > 22 MP chips for. This includes Creo / Leaf, Jenoptik and Mamiya.
    > Their competitor, Kodak, makes the chips used in medium format
    > backs from Phase One, Imacon and Sinar.
    >
    > Something that I learned, which I didn't know before, is that these
    > very large chips are made up from 1K X 1K sub-components. This
    > is unlike the much smaller chips, such as those up to APS-C size as
    > used in DSLRs and digicams, which are made from one continuous
    > die. The implication of this is that an imager of almost any size can
    > be made, because these large chips are made from 1K X 1K
    > components stitched together with firmware.


    http://www.luminous-landscape.com/essays/dalsa.shtml


    and one of DPR's forum participants, Eric Fossum is not only an
    inventor that has a stitched circuit patent applicable to sensors,
    there's also this DPR forum post (reformatted a bit) :

    >> Joe0Bloggs wrote:
    >> First thread gets full, generates a follow-up thread with his name
    >> in the title. That THAT thread gets full and spawns TWO new
    >> threads in his name! Will the trend continue? I see Eric Fossum
    >> threads in the billions in the future ;)

    >
    > LOL - he was famous long before posting here. It's not every day
    > that one has the opportunity to speak with the inventor of the
    > CMOS active pixel sensor (APS) camera-on-a-chip technology so
    > naturally his imput is very interesting and helps provide insights
    > into the development and progression of chip technology and direction....
    >
    > Lin



    http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1018&message=17193647


    > Title: Stitched circuits larger than the maximum reticle size in
    > sub-micron process


    http://www.freepatentsonline.com/6690076.html
    ASAAR, Feb 22, 2009
    #10
  11. Rich wrote:
    > "David J Taylor"
    > <-this-bit.nor-this.co.uk> wrote in
    > news:697ol.38288$:
    >
    >> Rich wrote:
    >> []
    >>> Also note, many individual sensors with HUGE pixels instead of just
    >>> 4-8 high pixel count devices. As for its size, there are already
    >>> 1.4 gigapixel astronomical imagers on ground-based telescopes.

    >>
    >> I was wondering what the pixel size was, but didn't read enough to
    >> find out. Remember that anything launched into space was probably
    >> designed with technology that's 5-10 years old, so I wouldn't expect
    >> it to compare with the latest ground-based instruments. Did you like
    >> the curved focal plane?

    >
    > It's nothing new to astronomers. They used curve focal planes with
    > film.


    Yes, I know, my wife used to use a Schmidt Telescope on a regular basis.
    I was more interested in the implementation with flat silicon sensors and
    correcting lenses, with the multiple sensors also being mounted on a
    curved plane.

    David
    David J Taylor, Feb 23, 2009
    #11
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