802.11i implementation

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by Arsene, Jan 20, 2008.

  1. Arsene

    Arsene Guest

    Is it possible to implement 802.11i in a home wireless network, with
    computers running Windows XP Pro (SP2), an using any one of several
    commercially available 802.11g routers (by Linksys, D-Link, etc.)?

    Thanks in advance for any help

    Arsene
     
    Arsene, Jan 20, 2008
    #1
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  2. Arsene

    Barb Bowman Guest

    802.11i includes WPA-AES and WPA2 both Personal and Enterprise. What
    exactly are you trying to do? Are you asking about using Enterprise
    level authentication? Please be specific. Many current routers
    support having radius servers etc. on the network.

    On Sun, 20 Jan 2008 20:05:22 GMT, Arsene <> wrote:

    >Is it possible to implement 802.11i in a home wireless network, with
    >computers running Windows XP Pro (SP2), an using any one of several
    >commercially available 802.11g routers (by Linksys, D-Link, etc.)?
    >
    >Thanks in advance for any help
    >
    >Arsene

    --

    Barb Bowman
    MS Windows-MVP
    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/
     
    Barb Bowman, Jan 20, 2008
    #2
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  3. Arsene

    Arsene Guest

    On Sun, 20 Jan 2008 16:04:48 -0500, Barb Bowman <>
    wrote:

    >802.11i includes WPA-AES and WPA2 both Personal and Enterprise. What
    >exactly are you trying to do? Are you asking about using Enterprise
    >level authentication? Please be specific. Many current routers
    >support having radius servers etc. on the network.
    >
    >On Sun, 20 Jan 2008 20:05:22 GMT, Arsene <> wrote:
    >
    >>Is it possible to implement 802.11i in a home wireless network, with
    >>computers running Windows XP Pro (SP2), an using any one of several
    >>commercially available 802.11g routers (by Linksys, D-Link, etc.)?
    >>
    >>Thanks in advance for any help
    >>
    >>Arsene


    A most everyone else these days, I use the internet to complete
    financial and investment transactions on a regular basis. Thus far, I
    have limited myself to connecting to my cable modem strictly in a
    wired manner, and use software wirewalls in all PCs.

    I would like the freedom of being able to relocate my computer(s) as
    needed within my house, without being restricted by the current
    communications wiring layout, nor being the potential subject of a
    local wireless hack.

    Thus, while perhaps an Enterprise level security scheme might be
    overkill, I would like to avoid encryption schemes that are apparently
    extremely easy to break into, such as WAP. In other words, I would
    like the strongest possible wireless protection that can be
    implemented using run-of-the-mill wireless routers designed for the
    home environment, and running WinXP.

    Again, thanks for any help you may provide to help me achieve this
    goal.

    Arsene
     
    Arsene, Jan 21, 2008
    #3
  4. Arsene

    Lem Guest

    Arsene wrote:
    > On Sun, 20 Jan 2008 16:04:48 -0500, Barb Bowman <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> 802.11i includes WPA-AES and WPA2 both Personal and Enterprise. What
    >> exactly are you trying to do? Are you asking about using Enterprise
    >> level authentication? Please be specific. Many current routers
    >> support having radius servers etc. on the network.
    >>
    >> On Sun, 20 Jan 2008 20:05:22 GMT, Arsene <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Is it possible to implement 802.11i in a home wireless network, with
    >>> computers running Windows XP Pro (SP2), an using any one of several
    >>> commercially available 802.11g routers (by Linksys, D-Link, etc.)?
    >>>
    >>> Thanks in advance for any help
    >>>
    >>> Arsene

    >
    > A most everyone else these days, I use the internet to complete
    > financial and investment transactions on a regular basis. Thus far, I
    > have limited myself to connecting to my cable modem strictly in a
    > wired manner, and use software wirewalls in all PCs.
    >
    > I would like the freedom of being able to relocate my computer(s) as
    > needed within my house, without being restricted by the current
    > communications wiring layout, nor being the potential subject of a
    > local wireless hack.
    >
    > Thus, while perhaps an Enterprise level security scheme might be
    > overkill, I would like to avoid encryption schemes that are apparently
    > extremely easy to break into, such as WAP. In other words, I would
    > like the strongest possible wireless protection that can be
    > implemented using run-of-the-mill wireless routers designed for the
    > home environment, and running WinXP.
    >
    > Again, thanks for any help you may provide to help me achieve this
    > goal.
    >
    > Arsene


    If all of your wifi equipment (that is, router and all wireless
    adapters) can support WPA2, use that. WPA2, used with a non-trivial
    password, should be unbreakable with tools available to non-governmental
    snoops.

    For password advice, see
    http://www.microsoft.com/protect/yourself/password/create.mspx

    There are also various "password generators" available on the web.
    Here's one: https://www.grc.com/passwords.htm
    The problem with passwords like the one's grc generates is that no human
    being could possibly remember them without writing them down. Then all
    that a would-be intruder has to do is find the Post-It.

    --
    Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking

    To the moon and back with 2K words of RAM and 36K words of ROM.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    http://history.nasa.gov/afj/compessay.htm
     
    Lem, Jan 21, 2008
    #4
  5. Hi
    801.11x (most common RADIUS Wireless server) serve few purposes, one of them
    is to achieve secure, controlled, documented logon. This type of control is
    Not adding to your security at home since you (and may be family members)
    are th only users.
    As far as WPA-AES it was Not as yet broken at any level. So as long as you
    have Wireless hardware that can be configured with WPA-AES you as safe is it
    could be.
    In any case these pages can help you in understanding what the RADIUS
    entails.
    http://www.wi-fiplanet.com/tutorials/article.php/3114511
    http://www.wi-fiplanet.com/tutorials/article.php/3287481
    http://www.wi-fiplanet.com/tutorials/article.php/3289231
    Jack (MVP-Networking).

    "Arsene" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Sun, 20 Jan 2008 16:04:48 -0500, Barb Bowman <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>802.11i includes WPA-AES and WPA2 both Personal and Enterprise. What
    >>exactly are you trying to do? Are you asking about using Enterprise
    >>level authentication? Please be specific. Many current routers
    >>support having radius servers etc. on the network.
    >>
    >>On Sun, 20 Jan 2008 20:05:22 GMT, Arsene <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>Is it possible to implement 802.11i in a home wireless network, with
    >>>computers running Windows XP Pro (SP2), an using any one of several
    >>>commercially available 802.11g routers (by Linksys, D-Link, etc.)?
    >>>
    >>>Thanks in advance for any help
    >>>
    >>>Arsene

    >
    > A most everyone else these days, I use the internet to complete
    > financial and investment transactions on a regular basis. Thus far, I
    > have limited myself to connecting to my cable modem strictly in a
    > wired manner, and use software wirewalls in all PCs.
    >
    > I would like the freedom of being able to relocate my computer(s) as
    > needed within my house, without being restricted by the current
    > communications wiring layout, nor being the potential subject of a
    > local wireless hack.
    >
    > Thus, while perhaps an Enterprise level security scheme might be
    > overkill, I would like to avoid encryption schemes that are apparently
    > extremely easy to break into, such as WAP. In other words, I would
    > like the strongest possible wireless protection that can be
    > implemented using run-of-the-mill wireless routers designed for the
    > home environment, and running WinXP.
    >
    > Again, thanks for any help you may provide to help me achieve this
    > goal.
    >
    > Arsene
     
    Jack \(MVP-Networking\)., Jan 21, 2008
    #5
  6. Arsene

    James Egan Guest

    On Mon, 21 Jan 2008 00:11:09 GMT, Arsene <> wrote:

    >A most everyone else these days, I use the internet to complete
    >financial and investment transactions on a regular basis. Thus far, I
    >have limited myself to connecting to my cable modem strictly in a
    >wired manner, and use software wirewalls in all PCs.


    This stuff will already be solidly encrypted (ssl) by your browser so
    won't be at risk to poor wireless encryption. More of a problem will
    be passwords travelling in the open (eg email), unauthorised sharing
    of your files and things like that.


    Jim.
     
    James Egan, Jan 21, 2008
    #6
  7. Arsene

    Barb Bowman Guest

    As others have stated, WPA2 is the strongest unbreakable security
    available.

    You can use a strong random key and XP has tools to help.
    Background info at
    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/security/expert/bowman_wirelesssecurity.mspx

    WPA2 support for XP is here http://support.microsoft.com/?id=893357

    Get yourself one of the newer routers that support Windows Connect
    Now. I recommend the following

    D-Link:
    DGL 4300
    DIR 655
    DIR 660
    DGL 4500

    with one of these routers and a USB flash key, XP will setup your
    network for you and save the settings using a strong passphrase to a
    USB flash key. You plug this into any computer to set up the network
    and save the flash key itself someplace safe. see
    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/networking/learnmore/bowman_05june13.mspx

    On Mon, 21 Jan 2008 00:11:09 GMT, Arsene <> wrote:

    >A most everyone else these days, I use the internet to complete
    >financial and investment transactions on a regular basis. Thus far, I
    >have limited myself to connecting to my cable modem strictly in a
    >wired manner, and use software wirewalls in all PCs.
    >
    >I would like the freedom of being able to relocate my computer(s) as
    >needed within my house, without being restricted by the current
    >communications wiring layout, nor being the potential subject of a
    >local wireless hack.
    >
    >Thus, while perhaps an Enterprise level security scheme might be
    >overkill, I would like to avoid encryption schemes that are apparently
    >extremely easy to break into, such as WAP. In other words, I would
    >like the strongest possible wireless protection that can be
    >implemented using run-of-the-mill wireless routers designed for the
    >home environment, and running WinXP.
    >
    >Again, thanks for any help you may provide to help me achieve this
    >goal.

    --

    Barb Bowman
    MS Windows-MVP
    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/
     
    Barb Bowman, Jan 21, 2008
    #7
  8. Arsene

    Arsene Guest

    Thank you all so much !!!!

    On Mon, 21 Jan 2008 06:10:39 -0500, Barb Bowman <>
    wrote:

    >As others have stated, WPA2 is the strongest unbreakable security
    >available.
    >
    >You can use a strong random key and XP has tools to help.
    >Background info at
    >http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/security/expert/bowman_wirelesssecurity.mspx
    >
    >WPA2 support for XP is here http://support.microsoft.com/?id=893357
    >
    >Get yourself one of the newer routers that support Windows Connect
    >Now. I recommend the following
    >
    >D-Link:
    >DGL 4300
    >DIR 655
    >DIR 660
    >DGL 4500
    >
    >with one of these routers and a USB flash key, XP will setup your
    >network for you and save the settings using a strong passphrase to a
    >USB flash key. You plug this into any computer to set up the network
    >and save the flash key itself someplace safe. see
    >http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/networking/learnmore/bowman_05june13.mspx
    >
    >On Mon, 21 Jan 2008 00:11:09 GMT, Arsene <> wrote:
    >
    >>A most everyone else these days, I use the internet to complete
    >>financial and investment transactions on a regular basis. Thus far, I
    >>have limited myself to connecting to my cable modem strictly in a
    >>wired manner, and use software wirewalls in all PCs.
    >>
    >>I would like the freedom of being able to relocate my computer(s) as
    >>needed within my house, without being restricted by the current
    >>communications wiring layout, nor being the potential subject of a
    >>local wireless hack.
    >>
    >>Thus, while perhaps an Enterprise level security scheme might be
    >>overkill, I would like to avoid encryption schemes that are apparently
    >>extremely easy to break into, such as WAP. In other words, I would
    >>like the strongest possible wireless protection that can be
    >>implemented using run-of-the-mill wireless routers designed for the
    >>home environment, and running WinXP.
    >>
    >>Again, thanks for any help you may provide to help me achieve this
    >>goal.
     
    Arsene, Jan 21, 2008
    #8
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