70-291 - Range of Addresses

Discussion in 'MCSA' started by Armand Collin, Apr 5, 2007.

  1. Hi everyone,

    Please see this description from MS-Press 70-291 Self Paced:

    For example, Figure 2-12 shows the address space for 10.0.0.0/12. Because
    this address is a Class A address, the default number of 1-bits in the
    subnet mask is 8; the mask has been extended 4 bits. Thus, 4 bits remain for
    the subnet ID and 20 bits remain for the host ID. On such a network, the
    range of addresses on the first subnet (ID 000) is 10.0.0.1-10.15.255.254.

    I understood how to calculate the number of subnets and the number of hosts
    per subnet, but how do you get this range - 10.0.0.1-10.15.255.254 ??

    Thanks in advance,

    Armand
     
    Armand Collin, Apr 5, 2007
    #1
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  2. Armand Collin

    Guest

    On Apr 5, 9:22 am, "Armand Collin" <>
    wrote:
    > Hi everyone,
    >
    > Please see this description from MS-Press 70-291 Self Paced:
    >
    > For example, Figure 2-12 shows the address space for 10.0.0.0/12. Because
    > this address is a Class A address, the default number of 1-bits in the
    > subnet mask is 8; the mask has been extended 4 bits. Thus, 4 bits remain for
    > the subnet ID and 20 bits remain for the host ID. On such a network, the
    > range of addresses on the first subnet (ID 000) is 10.0.0.1-10.15.255.254.
    >
    > I understood how to calculate the number of subnets and the number of hosts
    > per subnet, but how do you get this range - 10.0.0.1-10.15.255.254 ??
    >
    > Thanks in advance,
    >
    > Armand


    I am by no means an expert on this as I am studying myself for this
    same exam but I think you need to look at the range like this for it
    to make sense. It looks like the all 0's range.

    ..{0000}0000.00000000.00000001 - .{0000}1111.11111111.11111110

    I know in the past there were limits to the using a subnet 0 and all
    ones subnet and some devices would not allow you to use these subnets
    but now, at least on Cisco devices you can use them when the ip subnet
    zero command is configured.

    But again I am by no means an expert.

    Nick
     
    , Apr 5, 2007
    #2
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  3. Armand Collin

    TheITGirl Guest

    "Armand Collin" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi everyone,
    >
    > Please see this description from MS-Press 70-291 Self Paced:
    >
    > For example, Figure 2-12 shows the address space for 10.0.0.0/12. Because
    > this address is a Class A address, the default number of 1-bits in the
    > subnet mask is 8; the mask has been extended 4 bits. Thus, 4 bits remain
    > for the subnet ID and 20 bits remain for the host ID. On such a network,
    > the range of addresses on the first subnet (ID 000) is
    > 10.0.0.1-10.15.255.254.
    >
    > I understood how to calculate the number of subnets and the number of
    > hosts per subnet, but how do you get this range - 10.0.0.1-10.15.255.254
    > ??
    >
    > Thanks in advance,
    >
    > Armand
    >
    >
    >

    Hello Armand

    It may help to break the addresses down into binary.

    The network portion of the address, which will be the first 12 bits, is
    always going to be the same, so each address in the network will begin
    000001010 0000xxxx xxxxxxxx xxxxxxxx.

    The minimum value that the remaining 20 host bits can take is 0000 00000000
    00000001 (I believe Microsoft work on the assumption that you don't use
    subnet zero). The maximum value that the host bits can take is 1111
    11111111 11111110 (remember that you cannot have all ones in the host
    address because this is reserved for broadcasting).

    If you now add the the network bits to the minimum and maximum value for the
    host bits, the range of addresses in binary will be 00001010 00000000
    00000000 00000001 (10.0.0.1) to 00001010 00001111 11111111 11111110
    (10.15.255.254).

    Does that make it any easier?

    IT Girl MCDST
     
    TheITGirl, Apr 5, 2007
    #3
  4. Armand Collin

    CBIC Guest

    "TheITGirl" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    > Hello Armand
    >
    > It may help to break the addresses down into binary.
    >
    > The network portion of the address, which will be the first 12 bits, is
    > always going to be the same, so each address in the network will begin
    > 000001010 0000xxxx xxxxxxxx xxxxxxxx.
    >
    > The minimum value that the remaining 20 host bits can take is 0000
    > 00000000 00000001 (I believe Microsoft work on the assumption that you
    > don't use subnet zero). The maximum value that the host bits can take is
    > 1111 11111111 11111110 (remember that you cannot have all ones in the host
    > address because this is reserved for broadcasting).
    >
    > If you now add the the network bits to the minimum and maximum value for
    > the host bits, the range of addresses in binary will be 00001010 00000000
    > 00000000 00000001 (10.0.0.1) to 00001010 00001111 11111111 11111110
    > (10.15.255.254).
    >
    > Does that make it any easier?
    >


    That's a good explanation. Way better than I could do. It's one thing to
    know how to subnet and quite another to explain it. Nice job.
     
    CBIC, Apr 5, 2007
    #4
  5. Great Job! I have not performed subnetting in a while, and that returned
    me back to the good 'ol days. Excellent job in your explanation...

    --

    Michael D. Alligood
    MCSA, MCDST, MCP,
    A+, Network+, i-Net+,

    The Classroom Blog

    CertGuard Member
    The Stronghold for Excellence in I.T. Certification
    www.CertGuard.com



    "TheITGirl" <> wrote in message
    news::

    > "Armand Collin" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Hi everyone,
    > >
    > > Please see this description from MS-Press 70-291 Self Paced:
    > >
    > > For example, Figure 2-12 shows the address space for 10.0.0.0/12. Because
    > > this address is a Class A address, the default number of 1-bits in the
    > > subnet mask is 8; the mask has been extended 4 bits. Thus, 4 bits remain
    > > for the subnet ID and 20 bits remain for the host ID. On such a network,
    > > the range of addresses on the first subnet (ID 000) is
    > > 10.0.0.1-10.15.255.254.
    > >
    > > I understood how to calculate the number of subnets and the number of
    > > hosts per subnet, but how do you get this range - 10.0.0.1-10.15.255.254
    > > ??
    > >
    > > Thanks in advance,
    > >
    > > Armand
    > >
    > >
    > >

    > Hello Armand
    >
    > It may help to break the addresses down into binary.
    >
    > The network portion of the address, which will be the first 12 bits, is
    > always going to be the same, so each address in the network will begin
    > 000001010 0000xxxx xxxxxxxx xxxxxxxx.
    >
    > The minimum value that the remaining 20 host bits can take is 0000 00000000
    > 00000001 (I believe Microsoft work on the assumption that you don't use
    > subnet zero). The maximum value that the host bits can take is 1111
    > 11111111 11111110 (remember that you cannot have all ones in the host
    > address because this is reserved for broadcasting).
    >
    > If you now add the the network bits to the minimum and maximum value for the
    > host bits, the range of addresses in binary will be 00001010 00000000
    > 00000000 00000001 (10.0.0.1) to 00001010 00001111 11111111 11111110
    > (10.15.255.254).
    >
    > Does that make it any easier?
    >
    > IT Girl MCDST
     
    Michael D. Alligood, Apr 5, 2007
    #5
  6. Thanks for your responses guys!

    It's clear now.

    Regards,
    Armand


    "CBIC" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "TheITGirl" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >> Hello Armand
    >>
    >> It may help to break the addresses down into binary.
    >>
    >> The network portion of the address, which will be the first 12 bits, is
    >> always going to be the same, so each address in the network will begin
    >> 000001010 0000xxxx xxxxxxxx xxxxxxxx.
    >>
    >> The minimum value that the remaining 20 host bits can take is 0000
    >> 00000000 00000001 (I believe Microsoft work on the assumption that you
    >> don't use subnet zero). The maximum value that the host bits can take is
    >> 1111 11111111 11111110 (remember that you cannot have all ones in the
    >> host address because this is reserved for broadcasting).
    >>
    >> If you now add the the network bits to the minimum and maximum value for
    >> the host bits, the range of addresses in binary will be 00001010 00000000
    >> 00000000 00000001 (10.0.0.1) to 00001010 00001111 11111111 11111110
    >> (10.15.255.254).
    >>
    >> Does that make it any easier?
    >>

    >
    > That's a good explanation. Way better than I could do. It's one thing to
    > know how to subnet and quite another to explain it. Nice job.
    >
     
    Armand Collin, Apr 5, 2007
    #6
  7. Armand Collin

    TheITGirl Guest

    "Michael D. Alligood" <> wrote in message
    news:ua%...
    > Great Job! I have not performed subnetting in a while, and that returned
    > me back to the good 'ol days. Excellent job in your explanation...
    >
    > --
    >
    > Michael D. Alligood
    > MCSA, MCDST, MCP,
    > A+, Network+, i-Net+,
    >
    > The Classroom Blog
    >
    > CertGuard Member
    > The Stronghold for Excellence in I.T. Certification
    > www.CertGuard.com
    >

    Thanks Michael <head swells with pride>

    I don't do any subnetting at all in my job, but took a networking course as
    part of my degree and the binary side of things just "clicked".

    Regards.

    IT Girl MCDST
     
    TheITGirl, Apr 5, 2007
    #7
  8. Armand Collin

    TheITGirl Guest

    "CBIC" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "TheITGirl" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >> Hello Armand
    >>
    >> It may help to break the addresses down into binary.
    >>
    >> The network portion of the address, which will be the first 12 bits, is
    >> always going to be the same, so each address in the network will begin
    >> 000001010 0000xxxx xxxxxxxx xxxxxxxx.
    >>
    >> The minimum value that the remaining 20 host bits can take is 0000
    >> 00000000 00000001 (I believe Microsoft work on the assumption that you
    >> don't use subnet zero). The maximum value that the host bits can take is
    >> 1111 11111111 11111110 (remember that you cannot have all ones in the
    >> host address because this is reserved for broadcasting).
    >>
    >> If you now add the the network bits to the minimum and maximum value for
    >> the host bits, the range of addresses in binary will be 00001010 00000000
    >> 00000000 00000001 (10.0.0.1) to 00001010 00001111 11111111 11111110
    >> (10.15.255.254).
    >>
    >> Does that make it any easier?
    >>

    >
    > That's a good explanation. Way better than I could do. It's one thing to
    > know how to subnet and quite another to explain it. Nice job.
    >

    Thanks CBIC :)

    IT Girl MCDST
     
    TheITGirl, Apr 5, 2007
    #8
  9. Armand Collin

    catwalker63 Guest

    TheITGirl piffled away vaguely:

    <question and exceedingly excellent explanation snipped>

    Allow me to add my admiration for your explanation. Awesome!
    --

    Catwalker
    MCNGP #43
    www.mcngp.com
    "I have a gun. It's loaded. Shut up."
     
    catwalker63, Apr 5, 2007
    #9
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