6502?

Discussion in 'A+ Certification' started by David Hough, Feb 20, 2004.

  1. David Hough

    David Hough Guest

    Back in the days of the 6502, I subscribed to Byte magazine which came
    in a plain brown wrapper, which the post office,would open to check for
    porn. Us old timers need to go, for these certs, for two reasons.
    First, to upgrade your skills. second, on applying for employment, I
    figure each cert shaves five years off your age, when competing against
    someone younger, without the certs.
     
    David Hough, Feb 20, 2004
    #1
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  2. On Fri, 20 Feb 2004 06:25:54 -0500, David Hough <>
    wrote:

    >Back in the days of the 6502, I subscribed to Byte magazine which came
    >in a plain brown wrapper, which the post office,would open to check for
    >porn. Us old timers need to go, for these certs, for two reasons.
    >First, to upgrade your skills. second, on applying for employment, I
    >figure each cert shaves five years off your age, when competing against
    >someone younger, without the certs.


    6502? That's what I did machine code on in my electronics course.
    Memory lane here lately, guys! :)

    Tom
     
    Tom MacIntyre, Feb 20, 2004
    #2
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  3. David Hough

    Gary Guest

    Let me see that's a Motorola processor that was used in Apple's at the
    time.We used to use them were I used to work.


    On Fri, 20 Feb 2004 12:14:04 GMT, Tom MacIntyre
    <> wrote:

    >On Fri, 20 Feb 2004 06:25:54 -0500, David Hough <>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>Back in the days of the 6502, I subscribed to Byte magazine which came
    >>in a plain brown wrapper, which the post office,would open to check for
    >>porn. Us old timers need to go, for these certs, for two reasons.
    >>First, to upgrade your skills. second, on applying for employment, I
    >>figure each cert shaves five years off your age, when competing against
    >>someone younger, without the certs.

    >
    >6502? That's what I did machine code on in my electronics course.
    >Memory lane here lately, guys! :)
    >
    >Tom
     
    Gary, Feb 20, 2004
    #3
  4. On Fri, 20 Feb 2004 20:29:25 GMT, Gary <>
    wrote:

    >Let me see that's a Motorola processor that was used in Apple's at the
    >time.We used to use them were I used to work.
    >


    Apparently it was a group of ex-Motorola engineers who founded a
    company called MOS Technologies...

    http://www.arcula.demon.co.uk/65021.htm

    As you mention ,they were used in Apples, and also Commodores. We did
    most of our machine programming on what was called a KIM unit. It was
    all in an attache case, featuring the 6502 and a numeric keypad, plus
    support circuitry.

    http://oldcomputers.net/kim1.html

    We did some programming on the unit stand-alone, and also interfaced
    some external circuitry, including fiber optic kits (this was in
    1981-82). pRETTY INTERESTING STUFF FOR THAT ERA.

    tOM

    >
    >On Fri, 20 Feb 2004 12:14:04 GMT, Tom MacIntyre
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >>On Fri, 20 Feb 2004 06:25:54 -0500, David Hough <>
    >>wrote:
    >>
    >>>Back in the days of the 6502, I subscribed to Byte magazine which came
    >>>in a plain brown wrapper, which the post office,would open to check for
    >>>porn. Us old timers need to go, for these certs, for two reasons.
    >>>First, to upgrade your skills. second, on applying for employment, I
    >>>figure each cert shaves five years off your age, when competing against
    >>>someone younger, without the certs.

    >>
    >>6502? That's what I did machine code on in my electronics course.
    >>Memory lane here lately, guys! :)
    >>
    >>Tom
     
    Tom MacIntyre, Feb 20, 2004
    #4
  5. David Hough

    Tony Sivori Guest

    Tom MacIntyre wrote:
    > On Fri, 20 Feb 2004 06:25:54 -0500, David Hough wrote:
    >
    >>Back in the days of the 6502, I subscribed to Byte magazine which came
    >>in a plain brown wrapper, which the post office,would open to check for
    >>porn.

    >
    > 6502? That's what I did machine code on in my electronics course. Memory
    > lane here lately, guys! :)


    This evening I was paging through the April 1989 issue of Nibble (an Apple
    oriented magazine). Interesting stuff from the olden days, and even the
    advertisements are entertaining.

    1200 baud modem for $99, 2400 baud for $239. 1 MB of Ram, $495. 40 MB
    (Mega, not Giga) hard drive, $855.

    But my favorite was the "TransWarp GS Accelerator" for "Computing at warp
    speed!". For only $399, you could increase your Apple IIe processor speed
    from 2.6 MHz to "TransWarp mode" which was a blistering 7 MHz.

    --
    Tony Sivori
     
    Tony Sivori, Feb 21, 2004
    #5
  6. David Hough

    Gary Guest

    On Fri, 20 Feb 2004 20:57:57 GMT, Tom MacIntyre
    <> wrote:


    >company called MOS Technologies...
    >
    >http://www.arcula.demon.co.uk/65021.htm
    >
    >As you mention ,they were used in Apples, and also Commodores. We did
    >most of our machine programming on what was called a KIM unit. It was
    >all in an attache case, featuring the 6502 and a numeric keypad, plus
    >support circuitry.
    >


    That sounds like the same set up we had in Electronics school back
    1979 and we did some assembly language programming to.
    Gary
     
    Gary, Feb 21, 2004
    #6
  7. On Sat, 21 Feb 2004 12:39:33 GMT, Gary <>
    wrote:

    >On Fri, 20 Feb 2004 20:57:57 GMT, Tom MacIntyre
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>company called MOS Technologies...
    >>
    >>http://www.arcula.demon.co.uk/65021.htm
    >>
    >>As you mention ,they were used in Apples, and also Commodores. We did
    >>most of our machine programming on what was called a KIM unit. It was
    >>all in an attache case, featuring the 6502 and a numeric keypad, plus
    >>support circuitry.
    >>

    >
    >That sounds like the same set up we had in Electronics school back
    >1979 and we did some assembly language programming to.
    >Gary


    That was when my first year was also, 1979/80. :)

    Tom

    PS - I had 5 years of university under my belt by then also. :)
     
    Tom MacIntyre, Feb 21, 2004
    #7
  8. Hey, this is nice!!

    I'm 30, and I normally feel like the 'old' guy.

    I'm going to have to hang out around here more often......:eek:)

    JM
    --
    JonathanMiles at uk2 dot net

    PS, zx81, commodore vic20 and (Acorn) BBC model A were my introduction to
    computing, anyone remember them?? *tear forms in corner of eye as memories
    of "Elite" come flooding back.....*


    "David Hough" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    >
    > Hey Tom, I'll bet that machine code that you wrote for that, one
    > megahtz 6502, would benchmark faster, than visual basic today, running
    > on a pentium4.
    >



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    Jonathan Miles, Feb 22, 2004
    #8
  9. David Hough

    Gary Guest

    I had one of those Commodore Vic 20 things that came with Qbasic and
    you had to buy the external floppy if you wanted save anything.

    Gary

    On Sun, 22 Feb 2004 04:48:58 -0000, "Jonathan Miles"
    <jonathanmilesnospam@uk2dotnet> wrote:

    >Hey, this is nice!!
    >
    >I'm 30, and I normally feel like the 'old' guy.
    >
    >I'm going to have to hang out around here more often......:eek:)
    >
    >JM
     
    Gary, Feb 22, 2004
    #9
  10. David Hough

    Bedraggled Guest

    ......the dirt crawling Mars probe Sojourner had a 6502 on board....
    I smiled when I read that...wondering which grey haired engineer
    was falling back to the simple device he learned on ..long ago.
    But, hey, why not?...the system demands are limited..and the 6502 is
    a well known beastie..
     
    Bedraggled, Feb 23, 2004
    #10
  11. On Sun, 22 Feb 2004 13:58:19 GMT, Gary <>
    wrote:

    >I had one of those Commodore Vic 20 things that came with Qbasic and
    >you had to buy the external floppy if you wanted save anything.
    >
    >Gary


    I can remember using a mainframe in tech school where we used audio
    cassette tapes to save programs. :)

    Tom

    >
    >On Sun, 22 Feb 2004 04:48:58 -0000, "Jonathan Miles"
    ><jonathanmilesnospam@uk2dotnet> wrote:
    >
    >>Hey, this is nice!!
    >>
    >>I'm 30, and I normally feel like the 'old' guy.
    >>
    >>I'm going to have to hang out around here more often......:eek:)
    >>
    >>JM
     
    Tom MacIntyre, Feb 23, 2004
    #11
  12. On Mon, 23 Feb 2004 22:04:20 GMT, Doug Scott <> wrote:

    >Tom,
    >
    >> I can remember using a mainframe in tech school where we used audio
    >> cassette tapes to save programs. :)

    >
    >Oxymoron. What do you call a "mainframe"?
    >
    >---
    >
    >Doug
    >
    >
    >
    >


    Not an oxymoron to these guys...

    http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/m/mainframe.html

    It was a Hewlett Packard, not sure of the model. This was back in the
    mid-late 70's, so it wouldn't match up to the current definition
    power-wise.

    Tom
     
    Tom MacIntyre, Feb 23, 2004
    #12
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