64-bit Cisco VPN Client

Discussion in 'Windows 64bit' started by VistaNewbie, Jul 2, 2008.

  1. VistaNewbie

    VistaNewbie Guest

    I bought an HP Notebook to replace an old desktop that was running Windows
    XP Pro. The notebook was configured with:
    a.. Vista Home Premium (64-bit) SP1
    b.. Intel Core 2 Duo T9300 @ 2.50 GHz
    c.. 4.00 GB RAM
    To my dismay, I have discovered that the VPN client that my government
    agency requires to connect to my office network will not install on the
    notebook. The client is a 32-bit program and my IT department does not
    provide a 64-bit client. So my new notebook was rendered useless as a
    computer to telework with.

    I configured it as a 64-bit Vista OS because HP sales told me it was needed
    in order to be able to use the 4 GB of RAM. With memory becoming more
    affordable, it seems to me that more purchasers of new PCs will be taking
    advantage of the 4+ RAM options and hopefully companies like Cisco will see
    fit to release 64-bit versions of their programs.

    I have replaced the OS with a 32-bit Vista Home Premium and installed the
    VPN client. The tradeoff: loss of about a gigabyte of RAM for the ability
    to use my notebook to do my job.
     
    VistaNewbie, Jul 2, 2008
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. yes, we need the Cisco's and Adobe's and others to get with the program.

    That being said, you might have been able to work around the problem by
    running the Cisco VPN client in a virtual machine, running Vista (or XP)
    32-bit in the VM.

    --
    Charlie.
    http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
    http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel

    "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I bought an HP Notebook to replace an old desktop that was running Windows
    >XP Pro. The notebook was configured with:
    > a.. Vista Home Premium (64-bit) SP1
    > b.. Intel Core 2 Duo T9300 @ 2.50 GHz
    > c.. 4.00 GB RAM
    > To my dismay, I have discovered that the VPN client that my government
    > agency requires to connect to my office network will not install on the
    > notebook. The client is a 32-bit program and my IT department does not
    > provide a 64-bit client. So my new notebook was rendered useless as a
    > computer to telework with.
    >
    > I configured it as a 64-bit Vista OS because HP sales told me it was
    > needed in order to be able to use the 4 GB of RAM. With memory becoming
    > more affordable, it seems to me that more purchasers of new PCs will be
    > taking advantage of the 4+ RAM options and hopefully companies like Cisco
    > will see fit to release 64-bit versions of their programs.
    >
    > I have replaced the OS with a 32-bit Vista Home Premium and installed the
    > VPN client. The tradeoff: loss of about a gigabyte of RAM for the ability
    > to use my notebook to do my job.
     
    Charlie Russel - MVP, Jul 2, 2008
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. VistaNewbie

    VistaNewbie Guest

    I spent hours on the phone with HP and my agency's IT department looking for
    a workaround. No one offered running the Cisco VPN client in a virtual
    machine. If they had, and if I had confidence in how to do that, I would
    have tried it before sacrificing a gig of RAM and installing the 32-bit
    Vista.

    I suspect that going back to the 64-bit Vista to then attempt to:
    a) install the 32-bit client (It wouldn't install on Vista 64)
    b) run it in VM mode
    would be a significant undertaking with no guarantee that it will work.

    "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > yes, we need the Cisco's and Adobe's and others to get with the program.
    >
    > That being said, you might have been able to work around the problem by
    > running the Cisco VPN client in a virtual machine, running Vista (or XP)
    > 32-bit in the VM.
    >
    > --
    > Charlie.
    > http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
    > http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >
    > "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >>I bought an HP Notebook to replace an old desktop that was running Windows
    >>XP Pro. The notebook was configured with:
    >> a.. Vista Home Premium (64-bit) SP1
    >> b.. Intel Core 2 Duo T9300 @ 2.50 GHz
    >> c.. 4.00 GB RAM
    >> To my dismay, I have discovered that the VPN client that my government
    >> agency requires to connect to my office network will not install on the
    >> notebook. The client is a 32-bit program and my IT department does not
    >> provide a 64-bit client. So my new notebook was rendered useless as a
    >> computer to telework with.
    >>
    >> I configured it as a 64-bit Vista OS because HP sales told me it was
    >> needed in order to be able to use the 4 GB of RAM. With memory becoming
    >> more affordable, it seems to me that more purchasers of new PCs will be
    >> taking advantage of the 4+ RAM options and hopefully companies like Cisco
    >> will see fit to release 64-bit versions of their programs.
    >>
    >> I have replaced the OS with a 32-bit Vista Home Premium and installed the
    >> VPN client. The tradeoff: loss of about a gigabyte of RAM for the
    >> ability to use my notebook to do my job.

    >
     
    VistaNewbie, Jul 2, 2008
    #3
  4. VistaNewbie

    Zootal Guest

    Cisco makes a VPN client that runs on 64 bit WinXP. It is the Cisco
    AnyConnect VPN Client. I've been using it for a while now, and it works very
    well. Not sure if it would work for you or not, YMMV.


    "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I bought an HP Notebook to replace an old desktop that was running Windows
    >XP Pro. The notebook was configured with:
    > a.. Vista Home Premium (64-bit) SP1
    > b.. Intel Core 2 Duo T9300 @ 2.50 GHz
    > c.. 4.00 GB RAM
    > To my dismay, I have discovered that the VPN client that my government
    > agency requires to connect to my office network will not install on the
    > notebook. The client is a 32-bit program and my IT department does not
    > provide a 64-bit client. So my new notebook was rendered useless as a
    > computer to telework with.
    >
    > I configured it as a 64-bit Vista OS because HP sales told me it was
    > needed in order to be able to use the 4 GB of RAM. With memory becoming
    > more affordable, it seems to me that more purchasers of new PCs will be
    > taking advantage of the 4+ RAM options and hopefully companies like Cisco
    > will see fit to release 64-bit versions of their programs.
    >
    > I have replaced the OS with a 32-bit Vista Home Premium and installed the
    > VPN client. The tradeoff: loss of about a gigabyte of RAM for the ability
    > to use my notebook to do my job.
     
    Zootal, Jul 3, 2008
    #4
  5. No, they probably didn't. I have no way of knowing if it would work, but I
    can't think of a single reason why not. It doesn't depend on any hardware
    that's not available in the VM. It will connect the VM to your VPN, not the
    host, but you can communicate between the host and the guest, so I'm
    confident you can work with that.

    --
    Charlie.
    http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
    http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel

    "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I spent hours on the phone with HP and my agency's IT department looking
    >for a workaround. No one offered running the Cisco VPN client in a virtual
    >machine. If they had, and if I had confidence in how to do that, I would
    >have tried it before sacrificing a gig of RAM and installing the 32-bit
    >Vista.
    >
    > I suspect that going back to the 64-bit Vista to then attempt to:
    > a) install the 32-bit client (It wouldn't install on Vista 64)
    > b) run it in VM mode
    > would be a significant undertaking with no guarantee that it will work.
    >
    > "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> yes, we need the Cisco's and Adobe's and others to get with the program.
    >>
    >> That being said, you might have been able to work around the problem by
    >> running the Cisco VPN client in a virtual machine, running Vista (or XP)
    >> 32-bit in the VM.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Charlie.
    >> http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
    >> http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >>
    >> "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>>I bought an HP Notebook to replace an old desktop that was running
    >>>Windows XP Pro. The notebook was configured with:
    >>> a.. Vista Home Premium (64-bit) SP1
    >>> b.. Intel Core 2 Duo T9300 @ 2.50 GHz
    >>> c.. 4.00 GB RAM
    >>> To my dismay, I have discovered that the VPN client that my government
    >>> agency requires to connect to my office network will not install on the
    >>> notebook. The client is a 32-bit program and my IT department does not
    >>> provide a 64-bit client. So my new notebook was rendered useless as a
    >>> computer to telework with.
    >>>
    >>> I configured it as a 64-bit Vista OS because HP sales told me it was
    >>> needed in order to be able to use the 4 GB of RAM. With memory becoming
    >>> more affordable, it seems to me that more purchasers of new PCs will be
    >>> taking advantage of the 4+ RAM options and hopefully companies like
    >>> Cisco will see fit to release 64-bit versions of their programs.
    >>>
    >>> I have replaced the OS with a 32-bit Vista Home Premium and installed
    >>> the VPN client. The tradeoff: loss of about a gigabyte of RAM for the
    >>> ability to use my notebook to do my job.

    >>

    >
     
    Charlie Russel - MVP, Jul 3, 2008
    #5
  6. VistaNewbie

    DevilsPGD Guest

    In message <> "Charlie
    Russel - MVP" <> wrote:

    >No, they probably didn't. I have no way of knowing if it would work, but I
    >can't think of a single reason why not. It doesn't depend on any hardware
    >that's not available in the VM. It will connect the VM to your VPN, not the
    >host, but you can communicate between the host and the guest, so I'm
    >confident you can work with that.


    I can tell you that the Cisco VPN client from two or three years ago ran
    fine in a VM, although I haven't tested it recently.
     
    DevilsPGD, Jul 3, 2008
    #6
  7. VistaNewbie

    VistaNewbie Guest

    I have never run a program in a virtual machine and do not have a clue as to
    where to start but I am pretty good at following directions.

    Do I need to install any additional software on my system to run the client
    in a virtual machine? My first challenge is to figure out how to install
    the client. Obviously, there must be a different procedure for running the
    setup program in order to get it to install. Once installed, how would I
    run it "in a virtual machine"?

    Also, once connected to my office network, would I also have to run the
    application programs I use to perform my job "in a virtual machine"?
    Typically, I log on to Windows, connect to the internet, connect the VPN
    Client, connect to my network drives, launch Microsoft Outlook to access our
    Exchange server and use several programs on my notebook to performs tasks,
    e.g. Excel, Access, Word, Acrobat, WordPerfect, etc.

    I would like to be able to use all 4 GB of RAM I paid for and I would be
    willing to invest the time to set the notebaook back to its original 64-bit
    configuration but I need some assiatnace to get me there - even if it's just
    a general outline of the steps I need to perform after I restore the
    computer to a 64-bit Vista Home Premium edition.

    "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > No, they probably didn't. I have no way of knowing if it would work, but I
    > can't think of a single reason why not. It doesn't depend on any hardware
    > that's not available in the VM. It will connect the VM to your VPN, not
    > the host, but you can communicate between the host and the guest, so I'm
    > confident you can work with that.
    >
    > --
    > Charlie.
    > http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
    > http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >
    > "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >>I spent hours on the phone with HP and my agency's IT department looking
    >>for a workaround. No one offered running the Cisco VPN client in a
    >>virtual machine. If they had, and if I had confidence in how to do that,
    >>I would have tried it before sacrificing a gig of RAM and installing the
    >>32-bit Vista.
    >>
    >> I suspect that going back to the 64-bit Vista to then attempt to:
    >> a) install the 32-bit client (It wouldn't install on Vista 64)
    >> b) run it in VM mode
    >> would be a significant undertaking with no guarantee that it will work.
    >>
    >> "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> yes, we need the Cisco's and Adobe's and others to get with the program.
    >>>
    >>> That being said, you might have been able to work around the problem by
    >>> running the Cisco VPN client in a virtual machine, running Vista (or XP)
    >>> 32-bit in the VM.
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Charlie.
    >>> http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
    >>> http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >>>
    >>> "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>>I bought an HP Notebook to replace an old desktop that was running
    >>>>Windows XP Pro. The notebook was configured with:
    >>>> a.. Vista Home Premium (64-bit) SP1
    >>>> b.. Intel Core 2 Duo T9300 @ 2.50 GHz
    >>>> c.. 4.00 GB RAM
    >>>> To my dismay, I have discovered that the VPN client that my government
    >>>> agency requires to connect to my office network will not install on the
    >>>> notebook. The client is a 32-bit program and my IT department does not
    >>>> provide a 64-bit client. So my new notebook was rendered useless as a
    >>>> computer to telework with.
    >>>>
    >>>> I configured it as a 64-bit Vista OS because HP sales told me it was
    >>>> needed in order to be able to use the 4 GB of RAM. With memory
    >>>> becoming more affordable, it seems to me that more purchasers of new
    >>>> PCs will be taking advantage of the 4+ RAM options and hopefully
    >>>> companies like Cisco will see fit to release 64-bit versions of their
    >>>> programs.
    >>>>
    >>>> I have replaced the OS with a 32-bit Vista Home Premium and installed
    >>>> the VPN client. The tradeoff: loss of about a gigabyte of RAM for the
    >>>> ability to use my notebook to do my job.
    >>>

    >>

    >
     
    VistaNewbie, Jul 3, 2008
    #7
  8. VistaNewbie

    DevilsPGD Guest

    In message <>
    "VistaNewbie" <> wrote:

    >I have never run a program in a virtual machine and do not have a clue as to
    >where to start but I am pretty good at following directions.
    >
    >Do I need to install any additional software on my system to run the client
    >in a virtual machine? My first challenge is to figure out how to install
    >the client. Obviously, there must be a different procedure for running the
    >setup program in order to get it to install. Once installed, how would I
    >run it "in a virtual machine"?
    >
    >Also, once connected to my office network, would I also have to run the
    >application programs I use to perform my job "in a virtual machine"?
    >Typically, I log on to Windows, connect to the internet, connect the VPN
    >Client, connect to my network drives, launch Microsoft Outlook to access our
    >Exchange server and use several programs on my notebook to performs tasks,
    >e.g. Excel, Access, Word, Acrobat, WordPerfect, etc.
    >
    >I would like to be able to use all 4 GB of RAM I paid for and I would be
    >willing to invest the time to set the notebaook back to its original 64-bit
    >configuration but I need some assiatnace to get me there - even if it's just
    >a general outline of the steps I need to perform after I restore the
    >computer to a 64-bit Vista Home Premium edition.


    The first question is where did you get the 32-bit version of Vista? Did
    you buy it separately?

    The reason I ask, you'll need a second OS license for this purpose.

    In short, what you'll need to do is grab some virtual machine software.
    Microsoft's VirtualPC will do the job nicely, and it's free.

    Once the VM software is installed, you create a virtual machine in the
    software and install an operating system into that virtual machine.

    Think if it like an entirely separate computer that physically lives
    inside your machine. It has it's own set of hardware which is unrelated
    to your hardware, including it's own hard drive and operating system.

    Once you get that OS up and running (and install the appropriate "tools"
    or "additions" or whatever, you'll want to read the VM software's
    documentation for the details), then you install the Cisco VPN software
    and go nuts.

    This is a very high level overview, but it might get you started, or at
    least gives you a place to start reading and decide if it's worth the
    hassle.
     
    DevilsPGD, Jul 3, 2008
    #8
  9. The process requires installing some sort of virtualization software
    (Virtual PC is a good choice here, and free), then installing an operating
    system in a Virtual Machine created with that virtualization software. This
    could be XP or Vista, personally since it's a single use VM, I'd choose XP -
    the resource requirements are less. You'll need a license for that OS, by
    the way. Now, once you have the new OS installed, and communicating with the
    world, install the Cisco software.

    Trying to give you a "step by step" here is a bit beyond the scope of this
    newsgroup, frankly. But there is a VirtualPC specific newsgroup, some
    excellent blogs, and full download documentation from microsoft.com on
    VirtualPC and it's setup and configuration.

    BTW, I first talked about this alternative quite a while back:
    http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64/archive/2006/03/29/88280.aspx. There I used
    it as an alternative to dual-booting XP x64, and we didn't yet have a
    version of VirtualPC that worked in 64-bit, but the basic concept hasn't
    changed - use a virtualized legacy OS running on your new 64-bit hardware to
    get around compatibility issues.

    --
    Charlie.
    http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
    http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel

    "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    news:D...
    >I have never run a program in a virtual machine and do not have a clue as
    >to where to start but I am pretty good at following directions.
    >
    > Do I need to install any additional software on my system to run the
    > client in a virtual machine? My first challenge is to figure out how to
    > install the client. Obviously, there must be a different procedure for
    > running the setup program in order to get it to install. Once installed,
    > how would I run it "in a virtual machine"?
    >
    > Also, once connected to my office network, would I also have to run the
    > application programs I use to perform my job "in a virtual machine"?
    > Typically, I log on to Windows, connect to the internet, connect the VPN
    > Client, connect to my network drives, launch Microsoft Outlook to access
    > our Exchange server and use several programs on my notebook to performs
    > tasks, e.g. Excel, Access, Word, Acrobat, WordPerfect, etc.
    >
    > I would like to be able to use all 4 GB of RAM I paid for and I would be
    > willing to invest the time to set the notebaook back to its original
    > 64-bit configuration but I need some assiatnace to get me there - even if
    > it's just a general outline of the steps I need to perform after I restore
    > the computer to a 64-bit Vista Home Premium edition.
    >
    > "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> No, they probably didn't. I have no way of knowing if it would work, but
    >> I can't think of a single reason why not. It doesn't depend on any
    >> hardware that's not available in the VM. It will connect the VM to your
    >> VPN, not the host, but you can communicate between the host and the
    >> guest, so I'm confident you can work with that.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Charlie.
    >> http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
    >> http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >>
    >> "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>>I spent hours on the phone with HP and my agency's IT department looking
    >>>for a workaround. No one offered running the Cisco VPN client in a
    >>>virtual machine. If they had, and if I had confidence in how to do that,
    >>>I would have tried it before sacrificing a gig of RAM and installing the
    >>>32-bit Vista.
    >>>
    >>> I suspect that going back to the 64-bit Vista to then attempt to:
    >>> a) install the 32-bit client (It wouldn't install on Vista 64)
    >>> b) run it in VM mode
    >>> would be a significant undertaking with no guarantee that it will work.
    >>>
    >>> "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in
    >>> message news:...
    >>>> yes, we need the Cisco's and Adobe's and others to get with the
    >>>> program.
    >>>>
    >>>> That being said, you might have been able to work around the problem by
    >>>> running the Cisco VPN client in a virtual machine, running Vista (or
    >>>> XP) 32-bit in the VM.
    >>>>
    >>>> --
    >>>> Charlie.
    >>>> http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
    >>>> http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >>>>
    >>>> "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    >>>> news:...
    >>>>>I bought an HP Notebook to replace an old desktop that was running
    >>>>>Windows XP Pro. The notebook was configured with:
    >>>>> a.. Vista Home Premium (64-bit) SP1
    >>>>> b.. Intel Core 2 Duo T9300 @ 2.50 GHz
    >>>>> c.. 4.00 GB RAM
    >>>>> To my dismay, I have discovered that the VPN client that my government
    >>>>> agency requires to connect to my office network will not install on
    >>>>> the notebook. The client is a 32-bit program and my IT department
    >>>>> does not provide a 64-bit client. So my new notebook was rendered
    >>>>> useless as a computer to telework with.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I configured it as a 64-bit Vista OS because HP sales told me it was
    >>>>> needed in order to be able to use the 4 GB of RAM. With memory
    >>>>> becoming more affordable, it seems to me that more purchasers of new
    >>>>> PCs will be taking advantage of the 4+ RAM options and hopefully
    >>>>> companies like Cisco will see fit to release 64-bit versions of their
    >>>>> programs.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I have replaced the OS with a 32-bit Vista Home Premium and installed
    >>>>> the VPN client. The tradeoff: loss of about a gigabyte of RAM for the
    >>>>> ability to use my notebook to do my job.
    >>>>
    >>>

    >>

    >
     
    Charlie Russel - MVP, Jul 3, 2008
    #9
  10. VistaNewbie

    VistaNewbie Guest

    I discovered that notebook wouldn't allow the VPN client to install the
    first day I used it. I called HP customer support and after several calls
    they agreed that, because the computer was brand new, they would replace it
    with a 32-bit notebook as part of their customer satisfaction policy. After
    some discussion about how that would cost more money than to simply replace
    the OS, they agreed to ship me the 32-bit recovery DVDs for the system which
    allowed me to restore it to the factory settings for a 32-bit Vista system.

    I still have the original 64-bit recovery DVDs. I can get it back to the
    original 64-bit settings but I do not believe that the 32-bit "recovery"
    DVDs will allow me to install the 32-bit OS in a virtual machine. I may
    have to buy a retail license. I will probably take Charlie Russell's
    recommendation and "choose XP - the resource requirements are less."

    I know your reply is a high level summary but I get it. I understand the
    concept and the implementation details will come with some research.

    Thanks for your assistance.




    "DevilsPGD" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In message <>
    > "VistaNewbie" <> wrote:
    >
    >>I have never run a program in a virtual machine and do not have a clue as
    >>to
    >>where to start but I am pretty good at following directions.
    >>
    >>Do I need to install any additional software on my system to run the
    >>client
    >>in a virtual machine? My first challenge is to figure out how to install
    >>the client. Obviously, there must be a different procedure for running
    >>the
    >>setup program in order to get it to install. Once installed, how would I
    >>run it "in a virtual machine"?
    >>
    >>Also, once connected to my office network, would I also have to run the
    >>application programs I use to perform my job "in a virtual machine"?
    >>Typically, I log on to Windows, connect to the internet, connect the VPN
    >>Client, connect to my network drives, launch Microsoft Outlook to access
    >>our
    >>Exchange server and use several programs on my notebook to performs tasks,
    >>e.g. Excel, Access, Word, Acrobat, WordPerfect, etc.
    >>
    >>I would like to be able to use all 4 GB of RAM I paid for and I would be
    >>willing to invest the time to set the notebaook back to its original
    >>64-bit
    >>configuration but I need some assiatnace to get me there - even if it's
    >>just
    >>a general outline of the steps I need to perform after I restore the
    >>computer to a 64-bit Vista Home Premium edition.

    >
    > The first question is where did you get the 32-bit version of Vista? Did
    > you buy it separately?
    >
    > The reason I ask, you'll need a second OS license for this purpose.
    >
    > In short, what you'll need to do is grab some virtual machine software.
    > Microsoft's VirtualPC will do the job nicely, and it's free.
    >
    > Once the VM software is installed, you create a virtual machine in the
    > software and install an operating system into that virtual machine.
    >
    > Think if it like an entirely separate computer that physically lives
    > inside your machine. It has it's own set of hardware which is unrelated
    > to your hardware, including it's own hard drive and operating system.
    >
    > Once you get that OS up and running (and install the appropriate "tools"
    > or "additions" or whatever, you'll want to read the VM software's
    > documentation for the details), then you install the Cisco VPN software
    > and go nuts.
    >
    > This is a very high level overview, but it might get you started, or at
    > least gives you a place to start reading and decide if it's worth the
    > hassle.
     
    VistaNewbie, Jul 3, 2008
    #10
  11. VistaNewbie

    VistaNewbie Guest

    Thanks Charlie.

    I understand the concept and although it sounds like more than an
    afternoon's worth of work, I am going to try it. I appreciate your
    recommendations and will start with the VirtualPC setup and work my way
    through the OS installation and the required networking configurations to
    set up my telework office.

    Thank again.


    "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in message
    news:D...
    > The process requires installing some sort of virtualization software
    > (Virtual PC is a good choice here, and free), then installing an operating
    > system in a Virtual Machine created with that virtualization software.
    > This could be XP or Vista, personally since it's a single use VM, I'd
    > choose XP - the resource requirements are less. You'll need a license for
    > that OS, by the way. Now, once you have the new OS installed, and
    > communicating with the world, install the Cisco software.
    >
    > Trying to give you a "step by step" here is a bit beyond the scope of this
    > newsgroup, frankly. But there is a VirtualPC specific newsgroup, some
    > excellent blogs, and full download documentation from microsoft.com on
    > VirtualPC and it's setup and configuration.
    >
    > BTW, I first talked about this alternative quite a while back:
    > http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64/archive/2006/03/29/88280.aspx. There I
    > used it as an alternative to dual-booting XP x64, and we didn't yet have a
    > version of VirtualPC that worked in 64-bit, but the basic concept hasn't
    > changed - use a virtualized legacy OS running on your new 64-bit hardware
    > to get around compatibility issues.
    >
    > --
    > Charlie.
    > http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
    > http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >
    > "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    > news:D...
    >>I have never run a program in a virtual machine and do not have a clue as
    >>to where to start but I am pretty good at following directions.
    >>
    >> Do I need to install any additional software on my system to run the
    >> client in a virtual machine? My first challenge is to figure out how to
    >> install the client. Obviously, there must be a different procedure for
    >> running the setup program in order to get it to install. Once installed,
    >> how would I run it "in a virtual machine"?
    >>
    >> Also, once connected to my office network, would I also have to run the
    >> application programs I use to perform my job "in a virtual machine"?
    >> Typically, I log on to Windows, connect to the internet, connect the VPN
    >> Client, connect to my network drives, launch Microsoft Outlook to access
    >> our Exchange server and use several programs on my notebook to performs
    >> tasks, e.g. Excel, Access, Word, Acrobat, WordPerfect, etc.
    >>
    >> I would like to be able to use all 4 GB of RAM I paid for and I would be
    >> willing to invest the time to set the notebaook back to its original
    >> 64-bit configuration but I need some assiatnace to get me there - even if
    >> it's just a general outline of the steps I need to perform after I
    >> restore the computer to a 64-bit Vista Home Premium edition.
    >>
    >> "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> No, they probably didn't. I have no way of knowing if it would work, but
    >>> I can't think of a single reason why not. It doesn't depend on any
    >>> hardware that's not available in the VM. It will connect the VM to your
    >>> VPN, not the host, but you can communicate between the host and the
    >>> guest, so I'm confident you can work with that.
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Charlie.
    >>> http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
    >>> http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >>>
    >>> "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>>I spent hours on the phone with HP and my agency's IT department looking
    >>>>for a workaround. No one offered running the Cisco VPN client in a
    >>>>virtual machine. If they had, and if I had confidence in how to do
    >>>>that, I would have tried it before sacrificing a gig of RAM and
    >>>>installing the 32-bit Vista.
    >>>>
    >>>> I suspect that going back to the 64-bit Vista to then attempt to:
    >>>> a) install the 32-bit client (It wouldn't install on Vista 64)
    >>>> b) run it in VM mode
    >>>> would be a significant undertaking with no guarantee that it will work.
    >>>>
    >>>> "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in
    >>>> message news:...
    >>>>> yes, we need the Cisco's and Adobe's and others to get with the
    >>>>> program.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> That being said, you might have been able to work around the problem
    >>>>> by running the Cisco VPN client in a virtual machine, running Vista
    >>>>> (or XP) 32-bit in the VM.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> --
    >>>>> Charlie.
    >>>>> http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
    >>>>> http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >>>>>
    >>>>> "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    >>>>> news:...
    >>>>>>I bought an HP Notebook to replace an old desktop that was running
    >>>>>>Windows XP Pro. The notebook was configured with:
    >>>>>> a.. Vista Home Premium (64-bit) SP1
    >>>>>> b.. Intel Core 2 Duo T9300 @ 2.50 GHz
    >>>>>> c.. 4.00 GB RAM
    >>>>>> To my dismay, I have discovered that the VPN client that my
    >>>>>> government agency requires to connect to my office network will not
    >>>>>> install on the notebook. The client is a 32-bit program and my IT
    >>>>>> department does not provide a 64-bit client. So my new notebook was
    >>>>>> rendered useless as a computer to telework with.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> I configured it as a 64-bit Vista OS because HP sales told me it was
    >>>>>> needed in order to be able to use the 4 GB of RAM. With memory
    >>>>>> becoming more affordable, it seems to me that more purchasers of new
    >>>>>> PCs will be taking advantage of the 4+ RAM options and hopefully
    >>>>>> companies like Cisco will see fit to release 64-bit versions of their
    >>>>>> programs.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> I have replaced the OS with a 32-bit Vista Home Premium and installed
    >>>>>> the VPN client. The tradeoff: loss of about a gigabyte of RAM for
    >>>>>> the ability to use my notebook to do my job.
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>

    >>

    >
     
    VistaNewbie, Jul 3, 2008
    #11
  12. VistaNewbie

    Zootal Guest

    I run both Cisco and CheckPoint VPN clients in a VM running Win2000, and
    they both work very well.

    "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > No, they probably didn't. I have no way of knowing if it would work, but I
    > can't think of a single reason why not. It doesn't depend on any hardware
    > that's not available in the VM. It will connect the VM to your VPN, not
    > the host, but you can communicate between the host and the guest, so I'm
    > confident you can work with that.
    >
    > --
    > Charlie.
    > http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
    > http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >
    > "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >>I spent hours on the phone with HP and my agency's IT department looking
    >>for a workaround. No one offered running the Cisco VPN client in a
    >>virtual machine. If they had, and if I had confidence in how to do that,
    >>I would have tried it before sacrificing a gig of RAM and installing the
    >>32-bit Vista.
    >>
    >> I suspect that going back to the 64-bit Vista to then attempt to:
    >> a) install the 32-bit client (It wouldn't install on Vista 64)
    >> b) run it in VM mode
    >> would be a significant undertaking with no guarantee that it will work.
    >>
    >> "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> yes, we need the Cisco's and Adobe's and others to get with the program.
    >>>
    >>> That being said, you might have been able to work around the problem by
    >>> running the Cisco VPN client in a virtual machine, running Vista (or XP)
    >>> 32-bit in the VM.
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Charlie.
    >>> http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
    >>> http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >>>
    >>> "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>>I bought an HP Notebook to replace an old desktop that was running
    >>>>Windows XP Pro. The notebook was configured with:
    >>>> a.. Vista Home Premium (64-bit) SP1
    >>>> b.. Intel Core 2 Duo T9300 @ 2.50 GHz
    >>>> c.. 4.00 GB RAM
    >>>> To my dismay, I have discovered that the VPN client that my government
    >>>> agency requires to connect to my office network will not install on the
    >>>> notebook. The client is a 32-bit program and my IT department does not
    >>>> provide a 64-bit client. So my new notebook was rendered useless as a
    >>>> computer to telework with.
    >>>>
    >>>> I configured it as a 64-bit Vista OS because HP sales told me it was
    >>>> needed in order to be able to use the 4 GB of RAM. With memory
    >>>> becoming more affordable, it seems to me that more purchasers of new
    >>>> PCs will be taking advantage of the 4+ RAM options and hopefully
    >>>> companies like Cisco will see fit to release 64-bit versions of their
    >>>> programs.
    >>>>
    >>>> I have replaced the OS with a 32-bit Vista Home Premium and installed
    >>>> the VPN client. The tradeoff: loss of about a gigabyte of RAM for the
    >>>> ability to use my notebook to do my job.
    >>>

    >>

    >
     
    Zootal, Jul 3, 2008
    #12
  13. You are correct. I checked with my wife's HP laptop recovery cd just for
    grins and you cannot use it with a vm. You wouldn't be licensed to anyway.
    You cannot assign either of the OEM licenses to any other device, even on
    the same computer. A virtual machine is another device for licensing
    purposes. I also suggest you get an XP Pro retail license for the vm.

    "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    news:%...
    >I discovered that notebook wouldn't allow the VPN client to install the
    > first day I used it. I called HP customer support and after several calls
    > they agreed that, because the computer was brand new, they would replace
    > it
    > with a 32-bit notebook as part of their customer satisfaction policy.
    > After
    > some discussion about how that would cost more money than to simply
    > replace
    > the OS, they agreed to ship me the 32-bit recovery DVDs for the system
    > which
    > allowed me to restore it to the factory settings for a 32-bit Vista
    > system.
    >
    > I still have the original 64-bit recovery DVDs. I can get it back to the
    > original 64-bit settings but I do not believe that the 32-bit "recovery"
    > DVDs will allow me to install the 32-bit OS in a virtual machine. I may
    > have to buy a retail license. I will probably take Charlie Russell's
    > recommendation and "choose XP - the resource requirements are less."
    >
    > I know your reply is a high level summary but I get it. I understand the
    > concept and the implementation details will come with some research.
    >
    > Thanks for your assistance.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "DevilsPGD" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> In message <>
    >> "VistaNewbie" <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>I have never run a program in a virtual machine and do not have a clue as
    >>>to
    >>>where to start but I am pretty good at following directions.
    >>>
    >>>Do I need to install any additional software on my system to run the
    >>>client
    >>>in a virtual machine? My first challenge is to figure out how to install
    >>>the client. Obviously, there must be a different procedure for running
    >>>the
    >>>setup program in order to get it to install. Once installed, how would I
    >>>run it "in a virtual machine"?
    >>>
    >>>Also, once connected to my office network, would I also have to run the
    >>>application programs I use to perform my job "in a virtual machine"?
    >>>Typically, I log on to Windows, connect to the internet, connect the VPN
    >>>Client, connect to my network drives, launch Microsoft Outlook to access
    >>>our
    >>>Exchange server and use several programs on my notebook to performs
    >>>tasks,
    >>>e.g. Excel, Access, Word, Acrobat, WordPerfect, etc.
    >>>
    >>>I would like to be able to use all 4 GB of RAM I paid for and I would be
    >>>willing to invest the time to set the notebaook back to its original
    >>>64-bit
    >>>configuration but I need some assiatnace to get me there - even if it's
    >>>just
    >>>a general outline of the steps I need to perform after I restore the
    >>>computer to a 64-bit Vista Home Premium edition.

    >>
    >> The first question is where did you get the 32-bit version of Vista? Did
    >> you buy it separately?
    >>
    >> The reason I ask, you'll need a second OS license for this purpose.
    >>
    >> In short, what you'll need to do is grab some virtual machine software.
    >> Microsoft's VirtualPC will do the job nicely, and it's free.
    >>
    >> Once the VM software is installed, you create a virtual machine in the
    >> software and install an operating system into that virtual machine.
    >>
    >> Think if it like an entirely separate computer that physically lives
    >> inside your machine. It has it's own set of hardware which is unrelated
    >> to your hardware, including it's own hard drive and operating system.
    >>
    >> Once you get that OS up and running (and install the appropriate "tools"
    >> or "additions" or whatever, you'll want to read the VM software's
    >> documentation for the details), then you install the Cisco VPN software
    >> and go nuts.
    >>
    >> This is a very high level overview, but it might get you started, or at
    >> least gives you a place to start reading and decide if it's worth the
    >> hassle.

    >
     
    Colin Barnhorst, Jul 3, 2008
    #13
  14. Think of a virtual machine like you do any computer. You install and
    configure Windows on it exactly the same way you would on any other
    computer. Don't let the virtualization part distract you. You can keep it
    simple.

    "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Thanks Charlie.
    >
    > I understand the concept and although it sounds like more than an
    > afternoon's worth of work, I am going to try it. I appreciate your
    > recommendations and will start with the VirtualPC setup and work my way
    > through the OS installation and the required networking configurations to
    > set up my telework office.
    >
    > Thank again.
    >
    >
    > "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in message
    > news:D...
    >> The process requires installing some sort of virtualization software
    >> (Virtual PC is a good choice here, and free), then installing an
    >> operating system in a Virtual Machine created with that virtualization
    >> software. This could be XP or Vista, personally since it's a single use
    >> VM, I'd choose XP - the resource requirements are less. You'll need a
    >> license for that OS, by the way. Now, once you have the new OS installed,
    >> and communicating with the world, install the Cisco software.
    >>
    >> Trying to give you a "step by step" here is a bit beyond the scope of
    >> this newsgroup, frankly. But there is a VirtualPC specific newsgroup,
    >> some excellent blogs, and full download documentation from microsoft.com
    >> on VirtualPC and it's setup and configuration.
    >>
    >> BTW, I first talked about this alternative quite a while back:
    >> http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64/archive/2006/03/29/88280.aspx. There I
    >> used it as an alternative to dual-booting XP x64, and we didn't yet have
    >> a version of VirtualPC that worked in 64-bit, but the basic concept
    >> hasn't changed - use a virtualized legacy OS running on your new 64-bit
    >> hardware to get around compatibility issues.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Charlie.
    >> http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
    >> http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >>
    >> "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    >> news:D...
    >>>I have never run a program in a virtual machine and do not have a clue as
    >>>to where to start but I am pretty good at following directions.
    >>>
    >>> Do I need to install any additional software on my system to run the
    >>> client in a virtual machine? My first challenge is to figure out how to
    >>> install the client. Obviously, there must be a different procedure for
    >>> running the setup program in order to get it to install. Once
    >>> installed, how would I run it "in a virtual machine"?
    >>>
    >>> Also, once connected to my office network, would I also have to run the
    >>> application programs I use to perform my job "in a virtual machine"?
    >>> Typically, I log on to Windows, connect to the internet, connect the VPN
    >>> Client, connect to my network drives, launch Microsoft Outlook to access
    >>> our Exchange server and use several programs on my notebook to performs
    >>> tasks, e.g. Excel, Access, Word, Acrobat, WordPerfect, etc.
    >>>
    >>> I would like to be able to use all 4 GB of RAM I paid for and I would be
    >>> willing to invest the time to set the notebaook back to its original
    >>> 64-bit configuration but I need some assiatnace to get me there - even
    >>> if it's just a general outline of the steps I need to perform after I
    >>> restore the computer to a 64-bit Vista Home Premium edition.
    >>>
    >>> "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in
    >>> message news:...
    >>>> No, they probably didn't. I have no way of knowing if it would work,
    >>>> but I can't think of a single reason why not. It doesn't depend on any
    >>>> hardware that's not available in the VM. It will connect the VM to your
    >>>> VPN, not the host, but you can communicate between the host and the
    >>>> guest, so I'm confident you can work with that.
    >>>>
    >>>> --
    >>>> Charlie.
    >>>> http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
    >>>> http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >>>>
    >>>> "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    >>>> news:...
    >>>>>I spent hours on the phone with HP and my agency's IT department
    >>>>>looking for a workaround. No one offered running the Cisco VPN client
    >>>>>in a virtual machine. If they had, and if I had confidence in how to
    >>>>>do that, I would have tried it before sacrificing a gig of RAM and
    >>>>>installing the 32-bit Vista.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I suspect that going back to the 64-bit Vista to then attempt to:
    >>>>> a) install the 32-bit client (It wouldn't install on Vista 64)
    >>>>> b) run it in VM mode
    >>>>> would be a significant undertaking with no guarantee that it will
    >>>>> work.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in
    >>>>> message news:...
    >>>>>> yes, we need the Cisco's and Adobe's and others to get with the
    >>>>>> program.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> That being said, you might have been able to work around the problem
    >>>>>> by running the Cisco VPN client in a virtual machine, running Vista
    >>>>>> (or XP) 32-bit in the VM.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> --
    >>>>>> Charlie.
    >>>>>> http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
    >>>>>> http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    >>>>>> news:...
    >>>>>>>I bought an HP Notebook to replace an old desktop that was running
    >>>>>>>Windows XP Pro. The notebook was configured with:
    >>>>>>> a.. Vista Home Premium (64-bit) SP1
    >>>>>>> b.. Intel Core 2 Duo T9300 @ 2.50 GHz
    >>>>>>> c.. 4.00 GB RAM
    >>>>>>> To my dismay, I have discovered that the VPN client that my
    >>>>>>> government agency requires to connect to my office network will not
    >>>>>>> install on the notebook. The client is a 32-bit program and my IT
    >>>>>>> department does not provide a 64-bit client. So my new notebook was
    >>>>>>> rendered useless as a computer to telework with.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> I configured it as a 64-bit Vista OS because HP sales told me it was
    >>>>>>> needed in order to be able to use the 4 GB of RAM. With memory
    >>>>>>> becoming more affordable, it seems to me that more purchasers of new
    >>>>>>> PCs will be taking advantage of the 4+ RAM options and hopefully
    >>>>>>> companies like Cisco will see fit to release 64-bit versions of
    >>>>>>> their programs.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> I have replaced the OS with a 32-bit Vista Home Premium and
    >>>>>>> installed the VPN client. The tradeoff: loss of about a gigabyte of
    >>>>>>> RAM for the ability to use my notebook to do my job.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>

    >>

    >
     
    Colin Barnhorst, Jul 3, 2008
    #14
  15. Colin, you make a really good point. I've seen a lot of users over-think
    virtualization and try to make it something different than it is. It's just
    exactly like another physical computer, just that sharing space on the same
    physical box as its host.

    --
    Charlie.
    http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
    http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel

    "Colin Barnhorst" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Think of a virtual machine like you do any computer. You install and
    > configure Windows on it exactly the same way you would on any other
    > computer. Don't let the virtualization part distract you. You can keep
    > it simple.
    >
    > "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Thanks Charlie.
    >>
    >> I understand the concept and although it sounds like more than an
    >> afternoon's worth of work, I am going to try it. I appreciate your
    >> recommendations and will start with the VirtualPC setup and work my way
    >> through the OS installation and the required networking configurations to
    >> set up my telework office.
    >>
    >> Thank again.
    >>
    >>
    >> "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in message
    >> news:D...
    >>> The process requires installing some sort of virtualization software
    >>> (Virtual PC is a good choice here, and free), then installing an
    >>> operating system in a Virtual Machine created with that virtualization
    >>> software. This could be XP or Vista, personally since it's a single use
    >>> VM, I'd choose XP - the resource requirements are less. You'll need a
    >>> license for that OS, by the way. Now, once you have the new OS
    >>> installed, and communicating with the world, install the Cisco software.
    >>>
    >>> Trying to give you a "step by step" here is a bit beyond the scope of
    >>> this newsgroup, frankly. But there is a VirtualPC specific newsgroup,
    >>> some excellent blogs, and full download documentation from microsoft.com
    >>> on VirtualPC and it's setup and configuration.
    >>>
    >>> BTW, I first talked about this alternative quite a while back:
    >>> http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64/archive/2006/03/29/88280.aspx. There I
    >>> used it as an alternative to dual-booting XP x64, and we didn't yet have
    >>> a version of VirtualPC that worked in 64-bit, but the basic concept
    >>> hasn't changed - use a virtualized legacy OS running on your new 64-bit
    >>> hardware to get around compatibility issues.
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Charlie.
    >>> http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
    >>> http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >>>
    >>> "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:D...
    >>>>I have never run a program in a virtual machine and do not have a clue
    >>>>as to where to start but I am pretty good at following directions.
    >>>>
    >>>> Do I need to install any additional software on my system to run the
    >>>> client in a virtual machine? My first challenge is to figure out how
    >>>> to install the client. Obviously, there must be a different procedure
    >>>> for running the setup program in order to get it to install. Once
    >>>> installed, how would I run it "in a virtual machine"?
    >>>>
    >>>> Also, once connected to my office network, would I also have to run the
    >>>> application programs I use to perform my job "in a virtual machine"?
    >>>> Typically, I log on to Windows, connect to the internet, connect the
    >>>> VPN Client, connect to my network drives, launch Microsoft Outlook to
    >>>> access our Exchange server and use several programs on my notebook to
    >>>> performs tasks, e.g. Excel, Access, Word, Acrobat, WordPerfect, etc.
    >>>>
    >>>> I would like to be able to use all 4 GB of RAM I paid for and I would
    >>>> be willing to invest the time to set the notebaook back to its original
    >>>> 64-bit configuration but I need some assiatnace to get me there - even
    >>>> if it's just a general outline of the steps I need to perform after I
    >>>> restore the computer to a 64-bit Vista Home Premium edition.
    >>>>
    >>>> "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in
    >>>> message news:...
    >>>>> No, they probably didn't. I have no way of knowing if it would work,
    >>>>> but I can't think of a single reason why not. It doesn't depend on any
    >>>>> hardware that's not available in the VM. It will connect the VM to
    >>>>> your VPN, not the host, but you can communicate between the host and
    >>>>> the guest, so I'm confident you can work with that.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> --
    >>>>> Charlie.
    >>>>> http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
    >>>>> http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >>>>>
    >>>>> "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    >>>>> news:...
    >>>>>>I spent hours on the phone with HP and my agency's IT department
    >>>>>>looking for a workaround. No one offered running the Cisco VPN client
    >>>>>>in a virtual machine. If they had, and if I had confidence in how to
    >>>>>>do that, I would have tried it before sacrificing a gig of RAM and
    >>>>>>installing the 32-bit Vista.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> I suspect that going back to the 64-bit Vista to then attempt to:
    >>>>>> a) install the 32-bit client (It wouldn't install on Vista 64)
    >>>>>> b) run it in VM mode
    >>>>>> would be a significant undertaking with no guarantee that it will
    >>>>>> work.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in
    >>>>>> message news:...
    >>>>>>> yes, we need the Cisco's and Adobe's and others to get with the
    >>>>>>> program.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> That being said, you might have been able to work around the problem
    >>>>>>> by running the Cisco VPN client in a virtual machine, running Vista
    >>>>>>> (or XP) 32-bit in the VM.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> --
    >>>>>>> Charlie.
    >>>>>>> http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
    >>>>>>> http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    >>>>>>> news:...
    >>>>>>>>I bought an HP Notebook to replace an old desktop that was running
    >>>>>>>>Windows XP Pro. The notebook was configured with:
    >>>>>>>> a.. Vista Home Premium (64-bit) SP1
    >>>>>>>> b.. Intel Core 2 Duo T9300 @ 2.50 GHz
    >>>>>>>> c.. 4.00 GB RAM
    >>>>>>>> To my dismay, I have discovered that the VPN client that my
    >>>>>>>> government agency requires to connect to my office network will not
    >>>>>>>> install on the notebook. The client is a 32-bit program and my IT
    >>>>>>>> department does not provide a 64-bit client. So my new notebook
    >>>>>>>> was rendered useless as a computer to telework with.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> I configured it as a 64-bit Vista OS because HP sales told me it
    >>>>>>>> was needed in order to be able to use the 4 GB of RAM. With memory
    >>>>>>>> becoming more affordable, it seems to me that more purchasers of
    >>>>>>>> new PCs will be taking advantage of the 4+ RAM options and
    >>>>>>>> hopefully companies like Cisco will see fit to release 64-bit
    >>>>>>>> versions of their programs.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> I have replaced the OS with a 32-bit Vista Home Premium and
    >>>>>>>> installed the VPN client. The tradeoff: loss of about a gigabyte
    >>>>>>>> of RAM for the ability to use my notebook to do my job.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>

    >>

    >
     
    Charlie Russel - MVP, Jul 3, 2008
    #15
  16. Yup, what I'd expect. Thanks for the confirmation.

    --
    Charlie.
    http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
    http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel

    "Zootal" <> wrote in message
    news:ux$...
    >I run both Cisco and CheckPoint VPN clients in a VM running Win2000, and
    >they both work very well.
    >
    > "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> No, they probably didn't. I have no way of knowing if it would work, but
    >> I can't think of a single reason why not. It doesn't depend on any
    >> hardware that's not available in the VM. It will connect the VM to your
    >> VPN, not the host, but you can communicate between the host and the
    >> guest, so I'm confident you can work with that.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Charlie.
    >> http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
    >> http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >>
    >> "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>>I spent hours on the phone with HP and my agency's IT department looking
    >>>for a workaround. No one offered running the Cisco VPN client in a
    >>>virtual machine. If they had, and if I had confidence in how to do that,
    >>>I would have tried it before sacrificing a gig of RAM and installing the
    >>>32-bit Vista.
    >>>
    >>> I suspect that going back to the 64-bit Vista to then attempt to:
    >>> a) install the 32-bit client (It wouldn't install on Vista 64)
    >>> b) run it in VM mode
    >>> would be a significant undertaking with no guarantee that it will work.
    >>>
    >>> "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in
    >>> message news:...
    >>>> yes, we need the Cisco's and Adobe's and others to get with the
    >>>> program.
    >>>>
    >>>> That being said, you might have been able to work around the problem by
    >>>> running the Cisco VPN client in a virtual machine, running Vista (or
    >>>> XP) 32-bit in the VM.
    >>>>
    >>>> --
    >>>> Charlie.
    >>>> http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
    >>>> http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >>>>
    >>>> "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    >>>> news:...
    >>>>>I bought an HP Notebook to replace an old desktop that was running
    >>>>>Windows XP Pro. The notebook was configured with:
    >>>>> a.. Vista Home Premium (64-bit) SP1
    >>>>> b.. Intel Core 2 Duo T9300 @ 2.50 GHz
    >>>>> c.. 4.00 GB RAM
    >>>>> To my dismay, I have discovered that the VPN client that my government
    >>>>> agency requires to connect to my office network will not install on
    >>>>> the notebook. The client is a 32-bit program and my IT department
    >>>>> does not provide a 64-bit client. So my new notebook was rendered
    >>>>> useless as a computer to telework with.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I configured it as a 64-bit Vista OS because HP sales told me it was
    >>>>> needed in order to be able to use the 4 GB of RAM. With memory
    >>>>> becoming more affordable, it seems to me that more purchasers of new
    >>>>> PCs will be taking advantage of the 4+ RAM options and hopefully
    >>>>> companies like Cisco will see fit to release 64-bit versions of their
    >>>>> programs.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I have replaced the OS with a 32-bit Vista Home Premium and installed
    >>>>> the VPN client. The tradeoff: loss of about a gigabyte of RAM for the
    >>>>> ability to use my notebook to do my job.
    >>>>
    >>>

    >>

    >
    >
     
    Charlie Russel - MVP, Jul 3, 2008
    #16
  17. VistaNewbie

    VistaNewbie Guest

    Oh, well! Got stopped by the very first hurdle. I'm running Vista "Home
    Premium". Virtual PC requires Windows Vista Business, Windows Vista
    Enterprise, or Windows Vista Ultimate.

    I believe that would require me to purchase two new retail licenses: a
    64-bit & a 32-bit Vista Business licences. On-line pricing for OEM
    versions of these puts me in the $400 arena.

    I only telework one day a week and I think a quick cost/benefit analysis
    suggests that the $399 Lenovo 3000 N200 (0769-F8U) is a much more practical
    "out of the box" solution. Not much of a laptop but, for the money, it will
    work for me one day a week.

    Thanks all for the help.

    "Colin Barnhorst" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Think of a virtual machine like you do any computer. You install and
    > configure Windows on it exactly the same way you would on any other
    > computer. Don't let the virtualization part distract you. You can keep
    > it simple.
    >
    > "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Thanks Charlie.
    >>
    >> I understand the concept and although it sounds like more than an
    >> afternoon's worth of work, I am going to try it. I appreciate your
    >> recommendations and will start with the VirtualPC setup and work my way
    >> through the OS installation and the required networking configurations to
    >> set up my telework office.
    >>
    >> Thank again.
    >>
    >>
    >> "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in message
    >> news:D...
    >>> The process requires installing some sort of virtualization software
    >>> (Virtual PC is a good choice here, and free), then installing an
    >>> operating system in a Virtual Machine created with that virtualization
    >>> software. This could be XP or Vista, personally since it's a single use
    >>> VM, I'd choose XP - the resource requirements are less. You'll need a
    >>> license for that OS, by the way. Now, once you have the new OS
    >>> installed, and communicating with the world, install the Cisco software.
    >>>
    >>> Trying to give you a "step by step" here is a bit beyond the scope of
    >>> this newsgroup, frankly. But there is a VirtualPC specific newsgroup,
    >>> some excellent blogs, and full download documentation from microsoft.com
    >>> on VirtualPC and it's setup and configuration.
    >>>
    >>> BTW, I first talked about this alternative quite a while back:
    >>> http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64/archive/2006/03/29/88280.aspx. There I
    >>> used it as an alternative to dual-booting XP x64, and we didn't yet have
    >>> a version of VirtualPC that worked in 64-bit, but the basic concept
    >>> hasn't changed - use a virtualized legacy OS running on your new 64-bit
    >>> hardware to get around compatibility issues.
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Charlie.
    >>> http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
    >>> http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >>>
    >>> "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:D...
    >>>>I have never run a program in a virtual machine and do not have a clue
    >>>>as to where to start but I am pretty good at following directions.
    >>>>
    >>>> Do I need to install any additional software on my system to run the
    >>>> client in a virtual machine? My first challenge is to figure out how
    >>>> to install the client. Obviously, there must be a different procedure
    >>>> for running the setup program in order to get it to install. Once
    >>>> installed, how would I run it "in a virtual machine"?
    >>>>
    >>>> Also, once connected to my office network, would I also have to run the
    >>>> application programs I use to perform my job "in a virtual machine"?
    >>>> Typically, I log on to Windows, connect to the internet, connect the
    >>>> VPN Client, connect to my network drives, launch Microsoft Outlook to
    >>>> access our Exchange server and use several programs on my notebook to
    >>>> performs tasks, e.g. Excel, Access, Word, Acrobat, WordPerfect, etc.
    >>>>
    >>>> I would like to be able to use all 4 GB of RAM I paid for and I would
    >>>> be willing to invest the time to set the notebaook back to its original
    >>>> 64-bit configuration but I need some assiatnace to get me there - even
    >>>> if it's just a general outline of the steps I need to perform after I
    >>>> restore the computer to a 64-bit Vista Home Premium edition.
    >>>>
    >>>> "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in
    >>>> message news:...
    >>>>> No, they probably didn't. I have no way of knowing if it would work,
    >>>>> but I can't think of a single reason why not. It doesn't depend on any
    >>>>> hardware that's not available in the VM. It will connect the VM to
    >>>>> your VPN, not the host, but you can communicate between the host and
    >>>>> the guest, so I'm confident you can work with that.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> --
    >>>>> Charlie.
    >>>>> http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
    >>>>> http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >>>>>
    >>>>> "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    >>>>> news:...
    >>>>>>I spent hours on the phone with HP and my agency's IT department
    >>>>>>looking for a workaround. No one offered running the Cisco VPN client
    >>>>>>in a virtual machine. If they had, and if I had confidence in how to
    >>>>>>do that, I would have tried it before sacrificing a gig of RAM and
    >>>>>>installing the 32-bit Vista.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> I suspect that going back to the 64-bit Vista to then attempt to:
    >>>>>> a) install the 32-bit client (It wouldn't install on Vista 64)
    >>>>>> b) run it in VM mode
    >>>>>> would be a significant undertaking with no guarantee that it will
    >>>>>> work.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in
    >>>>>> message news:...
    >>>>>>> yes, we need the Cisco's and Adobe's and others to get with the
    >>>>>>> program.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> That being said, you might have been able to work around the problem
    >>>>>>> by running the Cisco VPN client in a virtual machine, running Vista
    >>>>>>> (or XP) 32-bit in the VM.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> --
    >>>>>>> Charlie.
    >>>>>>> http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
    >>>>>>> http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    >>>>>>> news:...
    >>>>>>>>I bought an HP Notebook to replace an old desktop that was running
    >>>>>>>>Windows XP Pro. The notebook was configured with:
    >>>>>>>> a.. Vista Home Premium (64-bit) SP1
    >>>>>>>> b.. Intel Core 2 Duo T9300 @ 2.50 GHz
    >>>>>>>> c.. 4.00 GB RAM
    >>>>>>>> To my dismay, I have discovered that the VPN client that my
    >>>>>>>> government agency requires to connect to my office network will not
    >>>>>>>> install on the notebook. The client is a 32-bit program and my IT
    >>>>>>>> department does not provide a 64-bit client. So my new notebook
    >>>>>>>> was rendered useless as a computer to telework with.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> I configured it as a 64-bit Vista OS because HP sales told me it
    >>>>>>>> was needed in order to be able to use the 4 GB of RAM. With memory
    >>>>>>>> becoming more affordable, it seems to me that more purchasers of
    >>>>>>>> new PCs will be taking advantage of the 4+ RAM options and
    >>>>>>>> hopefully companies like Cisco will see fit to release 64-bit
    >>>>>>>> versions of their programs.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> I have replaced the OS with a 32-bit Vista Home Premium and
    >>>>>>>> installed the VPN client. The tradeoff: loss of about a gigabyte
    >>>>>>>> of RAM for the ability to use my notebook to do my job.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>

    >>

    >
     
    VistaNewbie, Jul 4, 2008
    #17
  18. If you are referring to the advisory message when you install VPC on a Home
    edition, skip it. It is just advisory. And "not supported" does NOT mean
    "won't run". What "support" means is phone and email support from MS. VPC
    runs fine on the Vista home editions. The next time you see the advisory,
    check the box to "don't show this message again."

    "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Oh, well! Got stopped by the very first hurdle. I'm running Vista "Home
    > Premium". Virtual PC requires Windows Vista Business, Windows Vista
    > Enterprise, or Windows Vista Ultimate.
    >
    > I believe that would require me to purchase two new retail licenses: a
    > 64-bit & a 32-bit Vista Business licences. On-line pricing for OEM
    > versions of these puts me in the $400 arena.
    >
    > I only telework one day a week and I think a quick cost/benefit analysis
    > suggests that the $399 Lenovo 3000 N200 (0769-F8U) is a much more
    > practical "out of the box" solution. Not much of a laptop but, for the
    > money, it will work for me one day a week.
    >
    > Thanks all for the help.
    >
    > "Colin Barnhorst" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Think of a virtual machine like you do any computer. You install and
    >> configure Windows on it exactly the same way you would on any other
    >> computer. Don't let the virtualization part distract you. You can keep
    >> it simple.
    >>
    >> "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> Thanks Charlie.
    >>>
    >>> I understand the concept and although it sounds like more than an
    >>> afternoon's worth of work, I am going to try it. I appreciate your
    >>> recommendations and will start with the VirtualPC setup and work my way
    >>> through the OS installation and the required networking configurations
    >>> to set up my telework office.
    >>>
    >>> Thank again.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in
    >>> message news:D...
    >>>> The process requires installing some sort of virtualization software
    >>>> (Virtual PC is a good choice here, and free), then installing an
    >>>> operating system in a Virtual Machine created with that virtualization
    >>>> software. This could be XP or Vista, personally since it's a single use
    >>>> VM, I'd choose XP - the resource requirements are less. You'll need a
    >>>> license for that OS, by the way. Now, once you have the new OS
    >>>> installed, and communicating with the world, install the Cisco
    >>>> software.
    >>>>
    >>>> Trying to give you a "step by step" here is a bit beyond the scope of
    >>>> this newsgroup, frankly. But there is a VirtualPC specific newsgroup,
    >>>> some excellent blogs, and full download documentation from
    >>>> microsoft.com on VirtualPC and it's setup and configuration.
    >>>>
    >>>> BTW, I first talked about this alternative quite a while back:
    >>>> http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64/archive/2006/03/29/88280.aspx. There I
    >>>> used it as an alternative to dual-booting XP x64, and we didn't yet
    >>>> have a version of VirtualPC that worked in 64-bit, but the basic
    >>>> concept hasn't changed - use a virtualized legacy OS running on your
    >>>> new 64-bit hardware to get around compatibility issues.
    >>>>
    >>>> --
    >>>> Charlie.
    >>>> http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
    >>>> http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >>>>
    >>>> "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    >>>> news:D...
    >>>>>I have never run a program in a virtual machine and do not have a clue
    >>>>>as to where to start but I am pretty good at following directions.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Do I need to install any additional software on my system to run the
    >>>>> client in a virtual machine? My first challenge is to figure out how
    >>>>> to install the client. Obviously, there must be a different procedure
    >>>>> for running the setup program in order to get it to install. Once
    >>>>> installed, how would I run it "in a virtual machine"?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Also, once connected to my office network, would I also have to run
    >>>>> the application programs I use to perform my job "in a virtual
    >>>>> machine"? Typically, I log on to Windows, connect to the internet,
    >>>>> connect the VPN Client, connect to my network drives, launch Microsoft
    >>>>> Outlook to access our Exchange server and use several programs on my
    >>>>> notebook to performs tasks, e.g. Excel, Access, Word, Acrobat,
    >>>>> WordPerfect, etc.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I would like to be able to use all 4 GB of RAM I paid for and I would
    >>>>> be willing to invest the time to set the notebaook back to its
    >>>>> original 64-bit configuration but I need some assiatnace to get me
    >>>>> there - even if it's just a general outline of the steps I need to
    >>>>> perform after I restore the computer to a 64-bit Vista Home Premium
    >>>>> edition.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in
    >>>>> message news:...
    >>>>>> No, they probably didn't. I have no way of knowing if it would work,
    >>>>>> but I can't think of a single reason why not. It doesn't depend on
    >>>>>> any hardware that's not available in the VM. It will connect the VM
    >>>>>> to your VPN, not the host, but you can communicate between the host
    >>>>>> and the guest, so I'm confident you can work with that.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> --
    >>>>>> Charlie.
    >>>>>> http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
    >>>>>> http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    >>>>>> news:...
    >>>>>>>I spent hours on the phone with HP and my agency's IT department
    >>>>>>>looking for a workaround. No one offered running the Cisco VPN
    >>>>>>>client in a virtual machine. If they had, and if I had confidence in
    >>>>>>>how to do that, I would have tried it before sacrificing a gig of RAM
    >>>>>>>and installing the 32-bit Vista.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> I suspect that going back to the 64-bit Vista to then attempt to:
    >>>>>>> a) install the 32-bit client (It wouldn't install on Vista 64)
    >>>>>>> b) run it in VM mode
    >>>>>>> would be a significant undertaking with no guarantee that it will
    >>>>>>> work.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in
    >>>>>>> message news:...
    >>>>>>>> yes, we need the Cisco's and Adobe's and others to get with the
    >>>>>>>> program.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> That being said, you might have been able to work around the
    >>>>>>>> problem by running the Cisco VPN client in a virtual machine,
    >>>>>>>> running Vista (or XP) 32-bit in the VM.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> --
    >>>>>>>> Charlie.
    >>>>>>>> http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
    >>>>>>>> http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    >>>>>>>> news:...
    >>>>>>>>>I bought an HP Notebook to replace an old desktop that was running
    >>>>>>>>>Windows XP Pro. The notebook was configured with:
    >>>>>>>>> a.. Vista Home Premium (64-bit) SP1
    >>>>>>>>> b.. Intel Core 2 Duo T9300 @ 2.50 GHz
    >>>>>>>>> c.. 4.00 GB RAM
    >>>>>>>>> To my dismay, I have discovered that the VPN client that my
    >>>>>>>>> government agency requires to connect to my office network will
    >>>>>>>>> not install on the notebook. The client is a 32-bit program and
    >>>>>>>>> my IT department does not provide a 64-bit client. So my new
    >>>>>>>>> notebook was rendered useless as a computer to telework with.
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> I configured it as a 64-bit Vista OS because HP sales told me it
    >>>>>>>>> was needed in order to be able to use the 4 GB of RAM. With
    >>>>>>>>> memory becoming more affordable, it seems to me that more
    >>>>>>>>> purchasers of new PCs will be taking advantage of the 4+ RAM
    >>>>>>>>> options and hopefully companies like Cisco will see fit to release
    >>>>>>>>> 64-bit versions of their programs.
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> I have replaced the OS with a 32-bit Vista Home Premium and
    >>>>>>>>> installed the VPN client. The tradeoff: loss of about a gigabyte
    >>>>>>>>> of RAM for the ability to use my notebook to do my job.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>

    >>

    >
     
    Colin Barnhorst, Jul 4, 2008
    #18
  19. VistaNewbie

    VistaNewbie Guest

    I was referring to the Product Specifications for the guest OS listed on
    Microsoft's Virtual PC 2007 webpage
    (http://www.microsoft.com/windows/products/winfamily/virtualpc/overview.mspx).
    It specifically mentions the Business, Enterprise, and Ultimate versions of
    Vista as the requirements for Virtual PC 2007. The Virtual PC 2003 page
    also mentions only those three versions of Vista. Home Premium is excluded
    from both.


    "Colin Barnhorst" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > If you are referring to the advisory message when you install VPC on a
    > Home edition, skip it. It is just advisory. And "not supported" does NOT
    > mean "won't run". What "support" means is phone and email support from
    > MS. VPC runs fine on the Vista home editions. The next time you see the
    > advisory, check the box to "don't show this message again."
    >
    > "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Oh, well! Got stopped by the very first hurdle. I'm running Vista "Home
    >> Premium". Virtual PC requires Windows Vista Business, Windows Vista
    >> Enterprise, or Windows Vista Ultimate.
    >>
    >> I believe that would require me to purchase two new retail licenses: a
    >> 64-bit & a 32-bit Vista Business licences. On-line pricing for OEM
    >> versions of these puts me in the $400 arena.
    >>
    >> I only telework one day a week and I think a quick cost/benefit analysis
    >> suggests that the $399 Lenovo 3000 N200 (0769-F8U) is a much more
    >> practical "out of the box" solution. Not much of a laptop but, for the
    >> money, it will work for me one day a week.
    >>
    >> Thanks all for the help.
    >>
    >> "Colin Barnhorst" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> Think of a virtual machine like you do any computer. You install and
    >>> configure Windows on it exactly the same way you would on any other
    >>> computer. Don't let the virtualization part distract you. You can keep
    >>> it simple.
    >>>
    >>> "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>> Thanks Charlie.
    >>>>
    >>>> I understand the concept and although it sounds like more than an
    >>>> afternoon's worth of work, I am going to try it. I appreciate your
    >>>> recommendations and will start with the VirtualPC setup and work my way
    >>>> through the OS installation and the required networking configurations
    >>>> to set up my telework office.
    >>>>
    >>>> Thank again.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in
    >>>> message news:D...
    >>>>> The process requires installing some sort of virtualization software
    >>>>> (Virtual PC is a good choice here, and free), then installing an
    >>>>> operating system in a Virtual Machine created with that virtualization
    >>>>> software. This could be XP or Vista, personally since it's a single
    >>>>> use VM, I'd choose XP - the resource requirements are less. You'll
    >>>>> need a license for that OS, by the way. Now, once you have the new OS
    >>>>> installed, and communicating with the world, install the Cisco
    >>>>> software.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Trying to give you a "step by step" here is a bit beyond the scope of
    >>>>> this newsgroup, frankly. But there is a VirtualPC specific newsgroup,
    >>>>> some excellent blogs, and full download documentation from
    >>>>> microsoft.com on VirtualPC and it's setup and configuration.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> BTW, I first talked about this alternative quite a while back:
    >>>>> http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64/archive/2006/03/29/88280.aspx. There
    >>>>> I used it as an alternative to dual-booting XP x64, and we didn't yet
    >>>>> have a version of VirtualPC that worked in 64-bit, but the basic
    >>>>> concept hasn't changed - use a virtualized legacy OS running on your
    >>>>> new 64-bit hardware to get around compatibility issues.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> --
    >>>>> Charlie.
    >>>>> http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
    >>>>> http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >>>>>
    >>>>> "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    >>>>> news:D...
    >>>>>>I have never run a program in a virtual machine and do not have a clue
    >>>>>>as to where to start but I am pretty good at following directions.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Do I need to install any additional software on my system to run the
    >>>>>> client in a virtual machine? My first challenge is to figure out how
    >>>>>> to install the client. Obviously, there must be a different
    >>>>>> procedure for running the setup program in order to get it to
    >>>>>> install. Once installed, how would I run it "in a virtual machine"?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Also, once connected to my office network, would I also have to run
    >>>>>> the application programs I use to perform my job "in a virtual
    >>>>>> machine"? Typically, I log on to Windows, connect to the internet,
    >>>>>> connect the VPN Client, connect to my network drives, launch
    >>>>>> Microsoft Outlook to access our Exchange server and use several
    >>>>>> programs on my notebook to performs tasks, e.g. Excel, Access, Word,
    >>>>>> Acrobat, WordPerfect, etc.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> I would like to be able to use all 4 GB of RAM I paid for and I would
    >>>>>> be willing to invest the time to set the notebaook back to its
    >>>>>> original 64-bit configuration but I need some assiatnace to get me
    >>>>>> there - even if it's just a general outline of the steps I need to
    >>>>>> perform after I restore the computer to a 64-bit Vista Home Premium
    >>>>>> edition.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in
    >>>>>> message news:...
    >>>>>>> No, they probably didn't. I have no way of knowing if it would work,
    >>>>>>> but I can't think of a single reason why not. It doesn't depend on
    >>>>>>> any hardware that's not available in the VM. It will connect the VM
    >>>>>>> to your VPN, not the host, but you can communicate between the host
    >>>>>>> and the guest, so I'm confident you can work with that.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> --
    >>>>>>> Charlie.
    >>>>>>> http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
    >>>>>>> http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    >>>>>>> news:...
    >>>>>>>>I spent hours on the phone with HP and my agency's IT department
    >>>>>>>>looking for a workaround. No one offered running the Cisco VPN
    >>>>>>>>client in a virtual machine. If they had, and if I had confidence
    >>>>>>>>in how to do that, I would have tried it before sacrificing a gig of
    >>>>>>>>RAM and installing the 32-bit Vista.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> I suspect that going back to the 64-bit Vista to then attempt to:
    >>>>>>>> a) install the 32-bit client (It wouldn't install on Vista 64)
    >>>>>>>> b) run it in VM mode
    >>>>>>>> would be a significant undertaking with no guarantee that it will
    >>>>>>>> work.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in
    >>>>>>>> message news:...
    >>>>>>>>> yes, we need the Cisco's and Adobe's and others to get with the
    >>>>>>>>> program.
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> That being said, you might have been able to work around the
    >>>>>>>>> problem by running the Cisco VPN client in a virtual machine,
    >>>>>>>>> running Vista (or XP) 32-bit in the VM.
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> --
    >>>>>>>>> Charlie.
    >>>>>>>>> http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
    >>>>>>>>> http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    >>>>>>>>> news:...
    >>>>>>>>>>I bought an HP Notebook to replace an old desktop that was running
    >>>>>>>>>>Windows XP Pro. The notebook was configured with:
    >>>>>>>>>> a.. Vista Home Premium (64-bit) SP1
    >>>>>>>>>> b.. Intel Core 2 Duo T9300 @ 2.50 GHz
    >>>>>>>>>> c.. 4.00 GB RAM
    >>>>>>>>>> To my dismay, I have discovered that the VPN client that my
    >>>>>>>>>> government agency requires to connect to my office network will
    >>>>>>>>>> not install on the notebook. The client is a 32-bit program and
    >>>>>>>>>> my IT department does not provide a 64-bit client. So my new
    >>>>>>>>>> notebook was rendered useless as a computer to telework with.
    >>>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>> I configured it as a 64-bit Vista OS because HP sales told me it
    >>>>>>>>>> was needed in order to be able to use the 4 GB of RAM. With
    >>>>>>>>>> memory becoming more affordable, it seems to me that more
    >>>>>>>>>> purchasers of new PCs will be taking advantage of the 4+ RAM
    >>>>>>>>>> options and hopefully companies like Cisco will see fit to
    >>>>>>>>>> release 64-bit versions of their programs.
    >>>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>> I have replaced the OS with a 32-bit Vista Home Premium and
    >>>>>>>>>> installed the VPN client. The tradeoff: loss of about a gigabyte
    >>>>>>>>>> of RAM for the ability to use my notebook to do my job.
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>

    >>

    >
     
    VistaNewbie, Jul 4, 2008
    #19
  20. That's the other side of the coin I was describing. Those are the supported
    editions. MS is not going to list an edition for which Product Support
    Services does not provide support. MS is careful to advise users that only
    self-support options are available when using VPC with home editions.
    Self-support, of course, means user groups, the Knowledgebase, books, peers,
    experience, help files, etc.

    MS has never supported the home editions of either XP or Vista but VPC has
    always run on all of them and the home editions have always run as guests.
    MS does not comment on any Linux distributions that run in VPC either but
    over a thousand do.

    VPC is free and easily uninstalled. I know of no downside to trying it.

    "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I was referring to the Product Specifications for the guest OS listed on
    >Microsoft's Virtual PC 2007 webpage
    >(http://www.microsoft.com/windows/products/winfamily/virtualpc/overview.mspx).
    >It specifically mentions the Business, Enterprise, and Ultimate versions of
    >Vista as the requirements for Virtual PC 2007. The Virtual PC 2003 page
    >also mentions only those three versions of Vista. Home Premium is excluded
    >from both.
    >
    >
    > "Colin Barnhorst" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> If you are referring to the advisory message when you install VPC on a
    >> Home edition, skip it. It is just advisory. And "not supported" does
    >> NOT mean "won't run". What "support" means is phone and email support
    >> from MS. VPC runs fine on the Vista home editions. The next time you
    >> see the advisory, check the box to "don't show this message again."
    >>
    >> "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> Oh, well! Got stopped by the very first hurdle. I'm running Vista
    >>> "Home Premium". Virtual PC requires Windows Vista Business, Windows
    >>> Vista Enterprise, or Windows Vista Ultimate.
    >>>
    >>> I believe that would require me to purchase two new retail licenses: a
    >>> 64-bit & a 32-bit Vista Business licences. On-line pricing for OEM
    >>> versions of these puts me in the $400 arena.
    >>>
    >>> I only telework one day a week and I think a quick cost/benefit analysis
    >>> suggests that the $399 Lenovo 3000 N200 (0769-F8U) is a much more
    >>> practical "out of the box" solution. Not much of a laptop but, for the
    >>> money, it will work for me one day a week.
    >>>
    >>> Thanks all for the help.
    >>>
    >>> "Colin Barnhorst" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>> Think of a virtual machine like you do any computer. You install and
    >>>> configure Windows on it exactly the same way you would on any other
    >>>> computer. Don't let the virtualization part distract you. You can
    >>>> keep it simple.
    >>>>
    >>>> "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    >>>> news:...
    >>>>> Thanks Charlie.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I understand the concept and although it sounds like more than an
    >>>>> afternoon's worth of work, I am going to try it. I appreciate your
    >>>>> recommendations and will start with the VirtualPC setup and work my
    >>>>> way through the OS installation and the required networking
    >>>>> configurations to set up my telework office.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Thank again.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in
    >>>>> message news:D...
    >>>>>> The process requires installing some sort of virtualization software
    >>>>>> (Virtual PC is a good choice here, and free), then installing an
    >>>>>> operating system in a Virtual Machine created with that
    >>>>>> virtualization software. This could be XP or Vista, personally since
    >>>>>> it's a single use VM, I'd choose XP - the resource requirements are
    >>>>>> less. You'll need a license for that OS, by the way. Now, once you
    >>>>>> have the new OS installed, and communicating with the world, install
    >>>>>> the Cisco software.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Trying to give you a "step by step" here is a bit beyond the scope of
    >>>>>> this newsgroup, frankly. But there is a VirtualPC specific newsgroup,
    >>>>>> some excellent blogs, and full download documentation from
    >>>>>> microsoft.com on VirtualPC and it's setup and configuration.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> BTW, I first talked about this alternative quite a while back:
    >>>>>> http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64/archive/2006/03/29/88280.aspx. There
    >>>>>> I used it as an alternative to dual-booting XP x64, and we didn't yet
    >>>>>> have a version of VirtualPC that worked in 64-bit, but the basic
    >>>>>> concept hasn't changed - use a virtualized legacy OS running on your
    >>>>>> new 64-bit hardware to get around compatibility issues.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> --
    >>>>>> Charlie.
    >>>>>> http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
    >>>>>> http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    >>>>>> news:D...
    >>>>>>>I have never run a program in a virtual machine and do not have a
    >>>>>>>clue as to where to start but I am pretty good at following
    >>>>>>>directions.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Do I need to install any additional software on my system to run the
    >>>>>>> client in a virtual machine? My first challenge is to figure out
    >>>>>>> how to install the client. Obviously, there must be a different
    >>>>>>> procedure for running the setup program in order to get it to
    >>>>>>> install. Once installed, how would I run it "in a virtual machine"?
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Also, once connected to my office network, would I also have to run
    >>>>>>> the application programs I use to perform my job "in a virtual
    >>>>>>> machine"? Typically, I log on to Windows, connect to the internet,
    >>>>>>> connect the VPN Client, connect to my network drives, launch
    >>>>>>> Microsoft Outlook to access our Exchange server and use several
    >>>>>>> programs on my notebook to performs tasks, e.g. Excel, Access, Word,
    >>>>>>> Acrobat, WordPerfect, etc.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> I would like to be able to use all 4 GB of RAM I paid for and I
    >>>>>>> would be willing to invest the time to set the notebaook back to its
    >>>>>>> original 64-bit configuration but I need some assiatnace to get me
    >>>>>>> there - even if it's just a general outline of the steps I need to
    >>>>>>> perform after I restore the computer to a 64-bit Vista Home Premium
    >>>>>>> edition.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in
    >>>>>>> message news:...
    >>>>>>>> No, they probably didn't. I have no way of knowing if it would
    >>>>>>>> work, but I can't think of a single reason why not. It doesn't
    >>>>>>>> depend on any hardware that's not available in the VM. It will
    >>>>>>>> connect the VM to your VPN, not the host, but you can communicate
    >>>>>>>> between the host and the guest, so I'm confident you can work with
    >>>>>>>> that.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> --
    >>>>>>>> Charlie.
    >>>>>>>> http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
    >>>>>>>> http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    >>>>>>>> news:...
    >>>>>>>>>I spent hours on the phone with HP and my agency's IT department
    >>>>>>>>>looking for a workaround. No one offered running the Cisco VPN
    >>>>>>>>>client in a virtual machine. If they had, and if I had confidence
    >>>>>>>>>in how to do that, I would have tried it before sacrificing a gig
    >>>>>>>>>of RAM and installing the 32-bit Vista.
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> I suspect that going back to the 64-bit Vista to then attempt to:
    >>>>>>>>> a) install the 32-bit client (It wouldn't install on Vista 64)
    >>>>>>>>> b) run it in VM mode
    >>>>>>>>> would be a significant undertaking with no guarantee that it will
    >>>>>>>>> work.
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in
    >>>>>>>>> message news:...
    >>>>>>>>>> yes, we need the Cisco's and Adobe's and others to get with the
    >>>>>>>>>> program.
    >>>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>> That being said, you might have been able to work around the
    >>>>>>>>>> problem by running the Cisco VPN client in a virtual machine,
    >>>>>>>>>> running Vista (or XP) 32-bit in the VM.
    >>>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>> --
    >>>>>>>>>> Charlie.
    >>>>>>>>>> http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
    >>>>>>>>>> http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >>>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>> "VistaNewbie" <> wrote in message
    >>>>>>>>>> news:...
    >>>>>>>>>>>I bought an HP Notebook to replace an old desktop that was
    >>>>>>>>>>>running Windows XP Pro. The notebook was configured with:
    >>>>>>>>>>> a.. Vista Home Premium (64-bit) SP1
    >>>>>>>>>>> b.. Intel Core 2 Duo T9300 @ 2.50 GHz
    >>>>>>>>>>> c.. 4.00 GB RAM
    >>>>>>>>>>> To my dismay, I have discovered that the VPN client that my
    >>>>>>>>>>> government agency requires to connect to my office network will
    >>>>>>>>>>> not install on the notebook. The client is a 32-bit program and
    >>>>>>>>>>> my IT department does not provide a 64-bit client. So my new
    >>>>>>>>>>> notebook was rendered useless as a computer to telework with.
    >>>>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>> I configured it as a 64-bit Vista OS because HP sales told me it
    >>>>>>>>>>> was needed in order to be able to use the 4 GB of RAM. With
    >>>>>>>>>>> memory becoming more affordable, it seems to me that more
    >>>>>>>>>>> purchasers of new PCs will be taking advantage of the 4+ RAM
    >>>>>>>>>>> options and hopefully companies like Cisco will see fit to
    >>>>>>>>>>> release 64-bit versions of their programs.
    >>>>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>> I have replaced the OS with a 32-bit Vista Home Premium and
    >>>>>>>>>>> installed the VPN client. The tradeoff: loss of about a
    >>>>>>>>>>> gigabyte of RAM for the ability to use my notebook to do my job.
    >>>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>

    >>

    >
     
    Colin Barnhorst, Jul 4, 2008
    #20
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