500 GB WD My Book external H/D suddenly not wanting to fire up

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by muzician21, Apr 5, 2009.

  1. muzician21

    muzician21 Guest

    I've got this WD 500 gb Firewire external My Book drive I've been
    using to store mostly video files for a big video project. It doesn't
    have an on/off switch, it powers up when power is first applied, goes
    dormant after a period of inactivity and restarts when you try to
    access it. It's worked flawlessly until today.

    Normally the blue light in front dances up and down during boot up as
    well as whenever there's data transfer but now I notice the light
    flashes briefly when power is first applied, the drive makes some
    noise like it's starting to spool up but then shuts down. The couple
    of h/d's I've had die in the past gave me some warning, made weird
    clicking noises for a while before crapping out. This one was working
    perfectly normally until now. I wouldn't think overheating would be an
    issue with this drive, the case is extensively vented unlike most
    external drives I've seen. It doesn't get used that much.

    Anyone have experience with these drives? Any chance there's a power
    supply inside the case that's causing the problem and can be swapped
    with another from an identical drive? Would be a huge
    Aaaaargggghhhhh!!!!!! to lose the hundreds of gigs of files. Any
    chance WD would do such a repair? I don't want another drive, I need
    THIS drive to work.

    Thanks for all assistance.
     
    muzician21, Apr 5, 2009
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Tom E wrote:
    > "muzician21" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> I've got this WD 500 gb Firewire external My Book drive I've been
    >> using to store mostly video files for a big video project. It doesn't
    >> have an on/off switch, it powers up when power is first applied, goes
    >> dormant after a period of inactivity and restarts when you try to
    >> access it. It's worked flawlessly until today.
    >>
    >> Normally the blue light in front dances up and down during boot up as
    >> well as whenever there's data transfer but now I notice the light
    >> flashes briefly when power is first applied, the drive makes some
    >> noise like it's starting to spool up but then shuts down. The couple
    >> of h/d's I've had die in the past gave me some warning, made weird
    >> clicking noises for a while before crapping out. This one was working
    >> perfectly normally until now. I wouldn't think overheating would be
    >> an issue with this drive, the case is extensively vented unlike most
    >> external drives I've seen.


    Unless a drive has a decent volume of air moved across the PCB, it's doomed
    to a short life.

    USB caddies are death for any drive.
    Unless the PCB has a fan on it, even a tower spells death - unless maybe the
    drive sits on the floor of the tower rather than the confines of a 3.5" bay
    .... and even then it'll struggle.
    Best thing anyone can do for a caddied HDD, is give it it's freedom by
    cutting the PCB side off the caddy box and attaching an 80mm fan (and
    grille) - that or remove it from the caddy completely.


    It doesn't get used that much.
    >>
    >> Anyone have experience with these drives? Any chance there's a power
    >> supply inside the case that's causing the problem and can be swapped
    >> with another from an identical drive? Would be a huge
    >> Aaaaargggghhhhh!!!!!! to lose the hundreds of gigs of files. Any
    >> chance WD would do such a repair? I don't want another drive, I need
    >> THIS drive to work.
    >>
    >> Thanks for all assistance.
    >>

    >
    > Q1. Can you connect it to another comp............I ask this because
    > the Firewire port on my laptop is iffy and only sees the drive when
    > it wants to.
     
    Centre Parting, Apr 5, 2009
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. muzician21

    PeeCee Guest

    "muzician21" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I've got this WD 500 gb Firewire external My Book drive I've been
    > using to store mostly video files for a big video project. It doesn't
    > have an on/off switch, it powers up when power is first applied, goes
    > dormant after a period of inactivity and restarts when you try to
    > access it. It's worked flawlessly until today.
    >
    > Normally the blue light in front dances up and down during boot up as
    > well as whenever there's data transfer but now I notice the light
    > flashes briefly when power is first applied, the drive makes some
    > noise like it's starting to spool up but then shuts down. The couple
    > of h/d's I've had die in the past gave me some warning, made weird
    > clicking noises for a while before crapping out. This one was working
    > perfectly normally until now. I wouldn't think overheating would be an
    > issue with this drive, the case is extensively vented unlike most
    > external drives I've seen. It doesn't get used that much.
    >
    > Anyone have experience with these drives? Any chance there's a power
    > supply inside the case that's causing the problem and can be swapped
    > with another from an identical drive? Would be a huge
    > Aaaaargggghhhhh!!!!!! to lose the hundreds of gigs of files. Any
    > chance WD would do such a repair? I don't want another drive, I need
    > THIS drive to work.
    >
    > Thanks for all assistance.





    Is it this one?
    http://www.wdc.com/en/products/products.asp?driveid=351

    3 possibilities

    1 The AC adaptor has died, check with a voltmeter or subsitute adaptor.

    2 The Firewire electronics have died in the MyBook or your PC.
    Try the unit on another PC and if possible another firewire unit on your PC.
    (check the cable too)

    3 The drive itself has died.
    Check this by opening the case and mounting the drive inside your PC as a
    slave drive.
    You may have to add a PCI adaptor if it's SATA and you don't have SATA
    inside your PC.

    If this last one doesn't work then it's off to the data recovery
    specialists.
    If the drive does show up as a slave drive then you can make the backups you
    should have made in the first place!!!!!!!!!!!

    Best
    Paul.
     
    PeeCee, Apr 5, 2009
    #3
  4. muzician21

    muzician21 Guest

    On Apr 5, 6:48 am, "Band" <> wrote:
    > "muzician21" <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:...
    >
    > > I've got this WD 500 gb Firewire  external My Book drive I've been
    > > using to store mostly video files for a big video project. It doesn't
    > > have an on/off switch,

    >
    > Yes it does, the switch is on the rear panel, but.....



    Put it this way, there's not a switch I can turn to on/off. It's
    internal and self actuated.


    > If as implied, you are powering it from the firewire connection



    No, there's a separate external wall wart for power.
     
    muzician21, Apr 5, 2009
    #4
  5. muzician21

    PeeCee Guest

    "Centre Parting" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    snip
    > Unless a drive has a decent volume of air moved across the PCB, it's
    > doomed to a short life.


    snip

    Google's research suggests otherwise:

    From http://research.google.com/archive/disk_failures.pdf
    <quote>
    Contrary to previously reported results, we found
    very little correlation between failure rates and either
    elevated temperature or activity levels.
    </quote>

    http://www.engadget.com/2007/02/18/massive-google-hard-drive-survey-turns-up-very-interesting-thing/
    notes:
    <quote>
    there is less correlation between drive temperature and failure rates than
    might have been expected, and drives that are cooled excessively actually
    fail more often than those running a little hot
    </quote>


    best
    Paul.
     
    PeeCee, Apr 5, 2009
    #5
  6. PeeCee wrote:
    > "Centre Parting" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > snip
    >> Unless a drive has a decent volume of air moved across the PCB, it's
    >> doomed to a short life.

    >
    > snip
    >
    > Google's research suggests otherwise:
    >
    > From http://research.google.com/archive/disk_failures.pdf
    > <quote>
    > Contrary to previously reported results, we found
    > very little correlation between failure rates and either
    > elevated temperature or activity levels.
    > </quote>
    >
    > http://www.engadget.com/2007/02/18/massive-google-hard-drive-survey-turns-up-very-interesting-thing/
    > notes:
    > <quote>
    > there is less correlation between drive temperature and failure rates
    > than might have been expected, and drives that are cooled excessively
    > actually fail more often than those running a little hot
    > </quote>
    >
    >
    > best
    > Paul.


    Not my experience.

    I used to run my drives fanless.
    Had about 5 failures over 2 years.
    Since then (about five years ago) I've been running another 5 or so with
    fans .... and not a SINGLE failure.
    All were and continue to be on high quality PSU's and mobo's.

    Coincidence ?
    Doubtful.
     
    Centre Parting, Apr 5, 2009
    #6
  7. muzician21

    PeeCee Guest

    "Band" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "PeeCee" <> wrote in message
    > news:gr9nui$bdb$...
    >> "muzician21" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> I've got this WD 500 gb Firewire external My Book drive I've been
    >>> using to store mostly video files for a big video project. It doesn't
    >>> have an on/off switch, it powers up when power is first applied, goes
    >>> dormant after a period of inactivity and restarts when you try to
    >>> access it. It's worked flawlessly until today.
    >>>
    >>> Normally the blue light in front dances up and down during boot up as
    >>> well as whenever there's data transfer but now I notice the light
    >>> flashes briefly when power is first applied, the drive makes some
    >>> noise like it's starting to spool up but then shuts down. The couple
    >>> of h/d's I've had die in the past gave me some warning, made weird
    >>> clicking noises for a while before crapping out. This one was working
    >>> perfectly normally until now. I wouldn't think overheating would be an
    >>> issue with this drive, the case is extensively vented unlike most
    >>> external drives I've seen. It doesn't get used that much.
    >>>
    >>> Anyone have experience with these drives? Any chance there's a power
    >>> supply inside the case that's causing the problem and can be swapped
    >>> with another from an identical drive? Would be a huge
    >>> Aaaaargggghhhhh!!!!!! to lose the hundreds of gigs of files. Any
    >>> chance WD would do such a repair? I don't want another drive, I need
    >>> THIS drive to work.
    >>>
    >>> Thanks for all assistance.

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Is it this one?
    >> http://www.wdc.com/en/products/products.asp?driveid=351
    >>

    >
    > No, the OP stated it is a firewire drive, the link you posted is to a USB
    > drive...
    >



    OK so it's more likely this one
    http://www.wdc.com/en/products/products.asp?driveid=355

    Same comments apply

    P.
     
    PeeCee, Apr 6, 2009
    #7
  8. muzician21

    PeeCee Guest

    "Centre Parting" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > PeeCee wrote:
    >> "Centre Parting" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >> snip
    >>> Unless a drive has a decent volume of air moved across the PCB, it's
    >>> doomed to a short life.

    >>
    >> snip
    >>
    >> Google's research suggests otherwise:
    >>
    >> From http://research.google.com/archive/disk_failures.pdf
    >> <quote>
    >> Contrary to previously reported results, we found
    >> very little correlation between failure rates and either
    >> elevated temperature or activity levels.
    >> </quote>
    >>
    >> http://www.engadget.com/2007/02/18/massive-google-hard-drive-survey-turns-up-very-interesting-thing/
    >> notes:
    >> <quote>
    >> there is less correlation between drive temperature and failure rates
    >> than might have been expected, and drives that are cooled excessively
    >> actually fail more often than those running a little hot
    >> </quote>
    >>
    >>
    >> best
    >> Paul.

    >
    > Not my experience.
    >
    > I used to run my drives fanless.
    > Had about 5 failures over 2 years.
    > Since then (about five years ago) I've been running another 5 or so with
    > fans .... and not a SINGLE failure.
    > All were and continue to be on high quality PSU's and mobo's.
    >
    > Coincidence ?
    > Doubtful.
    >





    <quote>
    The data in this study are collected from a large number
    of disk drives, deployed in several types of systems
    across all of Google's services. More than one hundred
    thousand disk drives were used for all the results presented
    here.
    </quote>

    So your 10 drive 'experience' is more valid than the "more than one hundred
    thousand' Google used in their research.
    I don't think so.

    Yes it is good practice to have good ventilation for a PC in general.
    But freezing the balls of a Hard drives logic board is no guarantee it is
    not going to die.
    In fact if you 'read' the Google document and observe Figure 4, you should
    note that cooling the drive to much is likely to 'increase' the failure
    rate.

    Paul.
     
    PeeCee, Apr 6, 2009
    #8
  9. PeeCee wrote:
    > "Centre Parting" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> PeeCee wrote:
    >>> "Centre Parting" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>> snip
    >>>> Unless a drive has a decent volume of air moved across the PCB,
    >>>> it's doomed to a short life.
    >>>
    >>> snip
    >>>
    >>> Google's research suggests otherwise:
    >>>
    >>> From http://research.google.com/archive/disk_failures.pdf
    >>> <quote>
    >>> Contrary to previously reported results, we found
    >>> very little correlation between failure rates and either
    >>> elevated temperature or activity levels.
    >>> </quote>
    >>>
    >>> http://www.engadget.com/2007/02/18/massive-google-hard-drive-survey-turns-up-very-interesting-thing/
    >>> notes:
    >>> <quote>
    >>> there is less correlation between drive temperature and failure
    >>> rates than might have been expected, and drives that are cooled
    >>> excessively actually fail more often than those running a little hot
    >>> </quote>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> best
    >>> Paul.

    >>
    >> Not my experience.
    >>
    >> I used to run my drives fanless.
    >> Had about 5 failures over 2 years.
    >> Since then (about five years ago) I've been running another 5 or so
    >> with fans .... and not a SINGLE failure.
    >> All were and continue to be on high quality PSU's and mobo's.
    >>
    >> Coincidence ?
    >> Doubtful.
    >>

    >
    >
    >
    >
    > <quote>
    > The data in this study are collected from a large number
    > of disk drives, deployed in several types of systems
    > across all of Google's services. More than one hundred
    > thousand disk drives were used for all the results presented
    > here.
    > </quote>
    >
    > So your 10 drive 'experience' is more valid than the "more than one
    > hundred thousand' Google used in their research.
    > I don't think so.
    >
    > Yes it is good practice to have good ventilation for a PC in general.
    > But freezing the balls of a Hard drives logic board is no guarantee
    > it is not going to die.


    Freezing ?
    Even with a fan, they're still quite warm.

    But ultimately, you appear to be unaware of the class action suite bought by
    the US gov.t against IBM for HDD failures.
    And totally oblivious to the vested commercial interests at play here.
    This study was not conducted by any kind of academic institution - or
    subject to any kind of peer review.

    We have no knowledge of who funded it - or any way of qualifying its
    veracity.
    Anyone can claim to have conducted a massive study - and go on to draw
    whatever conclusions they choose.

    I would rather believe the evidence of my own experience than some bullshit
    'study' (read : commercial propaganda).
    Other than which, any overclocker will tell you that nothing kills a chip
    faster than heat.
    Try removing the heatsink from your GPU.
    It's common sense, if nothing else.


    > In fact if you 'read' the Google document and observe Figure 4, you
    > should note that cooling the drive to much is likely to 'increase'
    > the failure rate.
    >
    > Paul.
     
    Centre Parting, Apr 6, 2009
    #9
  10. muzician21

    thanatoid Guest

    muzician21 <> wrote in
    news:
    oups.com:

    > I've got this WD 500 gb Firewire external My Book drive
    > I've been using to store mostly video files for a big video
    > project. It doesn't have an on/off switch, it powers up
    > when power is first applied, goes dormant after a period of
    > inactivity and restarts when you try to access it. It's
    > worked flawlessly until today.


    Without reading the rest, or the replies, I will just say one
    thing.

    HD's fail, especially external ones (3x the price for the $10
    Chinese box and a $2 Chinese power adapter with the same drive
    inside that you could have put inside you machine).

    DVD's (or expensive tape drives used by corporations) are the
    only way to backup safely.
     
    thanatoid, Apr 6, 2009
    #10
  11. muzician21

    Rod Speed Guest

    thanatoid wrote:
    > muzician21 <> wrote in
    > news:
    > oups.com:
    >
    >> I've got this WD 500 gb Firewire external My Book drive
    >> I've been using to store mostly video files for a big video
    >> project. It doesn't have an on/off switch, it powers up
    >> when power is first applied, goes dormant after a period of
    >> inactivity and restarts when you try to access it. It's
    >> worked flawlessly until today.

    >
    > Without reading the rest, or the replies, I will just say one
    > thing.
    >
    > HD's fail, especially external ones (3x the price for the $10
    > Chinese box and a $2 Chinese power adapter with the same drive
    > inside that you could have put inside you machine).
    >
    > DVD's (or expensive tape drives used by corporations) are the only way to backup safely.


    Wrong, as always.
     
    Rod Speed, Apr 6, 2009
    #11
  12. muzician21

    PeeCee Guest

    "Centre Parting" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    class action suite bought by
    > the US gov.t against IBM for HDD failures.



    I take it there is some sort of heat related failure? do you have a url?
    Most of the searches I did found financial securities and other business
    actions.


    > I would rather believe the evidence of my own experience than some
    > bullshit 'study'



    Fair enough, one can only live life as one has experienced it.

    On that basis however 'my' experience tells me having a fan blowing on a
    Hard drive does not extend it's life.
    In fact just the opposite.
    (Unfortunately my sample has only two failed drives out of 14 installed.
    This covers 7 PC's from 2002 to 2009. )

    In case #1 the single drive in the case had a fan directed at the underneath
    from new, it died at about 24 Months.
    Case #2 has 3 drives in it, two had a front mounted fan blowin air over them
    (again from new), the third was buried in a 3.5" cage under the floppy
    drive.
    On this machine it was a drive in the fan air stream that died, again at
    about 24 months.
    Cases 3 to 7 didn't have any drive failures and none of those had a fan
    blowing over the hard drives.

    Paul.
     
    PeeCee, Apr 6, 2009
    #12
  13. PeeCee wrote:
    > "Centre Parting" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    > class action suite bought by
    >> the US gov.t against IBM for HDD failures.

    >
    >
    > I take it there is some sort of heat related failure? do you have a
    > url? Most of the searches I did found financial securities and other
    > business actions.
    >
    >
    >> I would rather believe the evidence of my own experience than some
    >> bullshit 'study'

    >
    >
    > Fair enough, one can only live life as one has experienced it.
    >
    > On that basis however 'my' experience tells me having a fan blowing
    > on a Hard drive does not extend it's life.
    > In fact just the opposite.
    > (Unfortunately my sample has only two failed drives out of 14
    > installed. This covers 7 PC's from 2002 to 2009. )
    >
    > In case #1 the single drive in the case had a fan directed at the
    > underneath from new, it died at about 24 Months.


    Manufacturing defect ?
    That heat causes HDD failures does not somehow exclude other factors from
    doing so too - as you are inferring.

    The Google study presumably polled a lot of PC users about HDD failures.

    Unfortunately, there is a component of the population that refuses to accept
    things they cannot understand - a typically left-brain-dominant
    characteristic that derives from an ability to see the bigger picture.
    Techies are predominantly left-brain thinkers and as such, frequently
    express frustration when unable to understand WHY something happens.

    This is frequently manifest as an autistic-like, stubborn refusal to accept
    what they see before them - indeed, it can even be manifest as a need to
    prove the opposite of what they see before them, so irksome do they find
    their failure to understand.
    But then, left-brainers are not big on understanding because they lack the
    vision and imagination required to see the wood for the trees.

    Of the laptops I have to repair, I'd say 80-90% are down to failed HDD's.
    My desktop repairs have nothing like this failure rate.

    Draw your own conclusions.


    > Case #2 has 3 drives in it, two had a front mounted fan blowin air
    > over them (again from new), the third was buried in a 3.5" cage under
    > the floppy drive.
    > On this machine it was a drive in the fan air stream that died, again
    > at about 24 months.
    > Cases 3 to 7 didn't have any drive failures and none of those had a
    > fan blowing over the hard drives.
    >
    > Paul.
     
    Centre Parting, Apr 6, 2009
    #13
  14. Centre Parting wrote:
    > PeeCee wrote:
    >> "Centre Parting" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>
    >> class action suite bought by
    >>> the US gov.t against IBM for HDD failures.

    >>
    >>
    >> I take it there is some sort of heat related failure? do you have a
    >> url? Most of the searches I did found financial securities and other
    >> business actions.
    >>
    >>
    >>> I would rather believe the evidence of my own experience than some
    >>> bullshit 'study'

    >>
    >>
    >> Fair enough, one can only live life as one has experienced it.
    >>
    >> On that basis however 'my' experience tells me having a fan blowing
    >> on a Hard drive does not extend it's life.
    >> In fact just the opposite.
    >> (Unfortunately my sample has only two failed drives out of 14
    >> installed. This covers 7 PC's from 2002 to 2009. )
    >>
    >> In case #1 the single drive in the case had a fan directed at the
    >> underneath from new, it died at about 24 Months.

    >
    > Manufacturing defect ?
    > That heat causes HDD failures does not somehow exclude other factors
    > from doing so too - as you are inferring.
    >
    > The Google study presumably polled a lot of PC users about HDD
    > failures.
    > Unfortunately, there is a component of the population that refuses to
    > accept things they cannot understand - a typically left-brain-dominant
    > characteristic that derives from an ability


    EDIT : - inability

    to see the bigger picture.
    > Techies are predominantly left-brain thinkers and as such, frequently
    > express frustration when unable to understand WHY something happens.
    >
    > This is frequently manifest as an autistic-like, stubborn refusal to
    > accept what they see before them - indeed, it can even be manifest as
    > a need to prove the opposite of what they see before them, so irksome
    > do they find their failure to understand.
    > But then, left-brainers are not big on understanding because they
    > lack the vision and imagination required to see the wood for the
    > trees.
    > Of the laptops I have to repair, I'd say 80-90% are down to failed
    > HDD's. My desktop repairs have nothing like this failure rate.
    >
    > Draw your own conclusions.
    >
    >
    >> Case #2 has 3 drives in it, two had a front mounted fan blowin air
    >> over them (again from new), the third was buried in a 3.5" cage under
    >> the floppy drive.
    >> On this machine it was a drive in the fan air stream that died, again
    >> at about 24 months.
    >> Cases 3 to 7 didn't have any drive failures and none of those had a
    >> fan blowing over the hard drives.
    >>
    >> Paul.
     
    Centre Parting, Apr 6, 2009
    #14
  15. muzician21 wrote:

    > I've got this WD 500 gb Firewire external My Book drive I've been
    > using to store mostly video files for a big video project. It doesn't
    > have an on/off switch, it powers up when power is first applied, goes
    > dormant after a period of inactivity and restarts when you try to
    > access it. It's worked flawlessly until today.
    >
    > Normally the blue light in front dances up and down during boot up as
    > well as whenever there's data transfer but now I notice the light
    > flashes briefly when power is first applied, the drive makes some
    > noise like it's starting to spool up but then shuts down. The couple
    > of h/d's I've had die in the past gave me some warning, made weird
    > clicking noises for a while before crapping out. This one was working
    > perfectly normally until now. I wouldn't think overheating would be an
    > issue with this drive, the case is extensively vented unlike most
    > external drives I've seen. It doesn't get used that much.
    >
    > Anyone have experience with these drives? Any chance there's a power
    > supply inside the case that's causing the problem and can be swapped
    > with another from an identical drive?


    The power supply is external, but there are voltage regulators inside
    the drive enclosure to convert the +12V from the power supply to +3.3V
    and +5V used by the chips in the drive and the interface circuitry.

    > Aaaaargggghhhhh!!!!!! to lose the hundreds of gigs of files. Any
    > chance WD would do such a repair? I don't want another drive, I need
    > THIS drive to work.


    Data recovery is NOT included with the warranty, but you're supposed
    to have an extra HD for backup anyway because computers can wipe out
    tons of data in a hurry. Also a 1TB drive costs just $100, which is a
    lot, lot less than the cheapest data recovery service.
     
    larry moe 'n curly, Apr 6, 2009
    #15
  16. muzician21

    Aardvark Guest

    On Mon, 06 Apr 2009 07:38:28 +0100, Centre Parting wrote:

    > class action suite


    Made me think of a set of bedroom furniture built including straps and
    chains and various appurtenances to facilitate lots of hot, dirty sex.

    :)

    --
    The month of March in this year of 2009 sees the centenary of the laying
    of the keel of the most famous (or infamous) ocean liner of all time, RMS
    Titanic, at Harland & Wolff shipyard in Belfast.
    < http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RMS_Titanic>
     
    Aardvark, Apr 6, 2009
    #16
  17. muzician21

    Rod Speed Guest

    Centre Parting wrote:
    > PeeCee wrote:
    >> "Centre Parting" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>
    >> class action suite bought by
    >>> the US gov.t against IBM for HDD failures.

    >>
    >>
    >> I take it there is some sort of heat related failure? do you have a
    >> url? Most of the searches I did found financial securities and other
    >> business actions.
    >>
    >>
    >>> I would rather believe the evidence of my own experience than some
    >>> bullshit 'study'

    >>
    >>
    >> Fair enough, one can only live life as one has experienced it.
    >>
    >> On that basis however 'my' experience tells me having a fan blowing
    >> on a Hard drive does not extend it's life.
    >> In fact just the opposite.
    >> (Unfortunately my sample has only two failed drives out of 14
    >> installed. This covers 7 PC's from 2002 to 2009. )
    >>
    >> In case #1 the single drive in the case had a fan directed at the
    >> underneath from new, it died at about 24 Months.

    >
    > Manufacturing defect ?
    > That heat causes HDD failures does not somehow exclude other factors
    > from doing so too - as you are inferring.
    >
    > The Google study presumably polled a lot of PC users about HDD failures.


    Nope, they analysed the failures of THEIR OWN hard drives.

    > Unfortunately, there is a component of the population that refuses to
    > accept things they cannot understand - a typically left-brain-dominant
    > characteristic that derives from an ability to see the bigger picture.
    > Techies are predominantly left-brain thinkers and as such, frequently
    > express frustration when unable to understand WHY something happens.
    >
    > This is frequently manifest as an autistic-like, stubborn refusal to
    > accept what they see before them - indeed, it can even be manifest as
    > a need to prove the opposite of what they see before them, so irksome
    > do they find their failure to understand.
    > But then, left-brainers are not big on understanding because they
    > lack the vision and imagination required to see the wood for the
    > trees.
    > Of the laptops I have to repair, I'd say 80-90% are down to failed
    > HDD's. My desktop repairs have nothing like this failure rate.
    >
    > Draw your own conclusions.
    >
    >
    >> Case #2 has 3 drives in it, two had a front mounted fan blowin air
    >> over them (again from new), the third was buried in a 3.5" cage under
    >> the floppy drive.
    >> On this machine it was a drive in the fan air stream that died, again
    >> at about 24 months.
    >> Cases 3 to 7 didn't have any drive failures and none of those had a
    >> fan blowing over the hard drives.
    >>
    >> Paul.
     
    Rod Speed, Apr 6, 2009
    #17
  18. muzician21

    thanatoid Guest

    "Rod Speed" <> wrote in
    news::

    > thanatoid wrote:


    <SNIP>

    >> HD's fail, especially external ones (3x the price for the
    >> $10 Chinese box and a $2 Chinese power adapter with the
    >> same drive inside that you could have put inside you
    >> machine).
    >>
    >> DVD's (or expensive tape drives used by corporations) are
    >> the only way to backup safely.

    >
    > Wrong, as always.


    MOST interesting comment from someone with a 13-year old's
    nickname (if it's your /real name/, my deepest sympathies) who
    (to my recollection) has never posted ANY advice, and who uses
    OE for newsgroups.

    I am often wrong, and have no problem with admitting it when I
    am corrected by someone who knows what they're talking about.

    But NO ONE is ALWAYS wrong or ALWAYS right - including you.

    Now go **** yourself.
     
    thanatoid, Apr 6, 2009
    #18
  19. Rod Speed wrote:
    > Centre Parting wrote:
    >> PeeCee wrote:
    >>> "Centre Parting" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>
    >>> class action suite bought by
    >>>> the US gov.t against IBM for HDD failures.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> I take it there is some sort of heat related failure? do you have a
    >>> url? Most of the searches I did found financial securities and other
    >>> business actions.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> I would rather believe the evidence of my own experience than some
    >>>> bullshit 'study'
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Fair enough, one can only live life as one has experienced it.
    >>>
    >>> On that basis however 'my' experience tells me having a fan blowing
    >>> on a Hard drive does not extend it's life.
    >>> In fact just the opposite.
    >>> (Unfortunately my sample has only two failed drives out of 14
    >>> installed. This covers 7 PC's from 2002 to 2009. )
    >>>
    >>> In case #1 the single drive in the case had a fan directed at the
    >>> underneath from new, it died at about 24 Months.

    >>
    >> Manufacturing defect ?
    >> That heat causes HDD failures does not somehow exclude other factors
    >> from doing so too - as you are inferring.
    >>
    >> The Google study presumably polled a lot of PC users about HDD
    >> failures.

    >
    > Nope, they analysed the failures of THEIR OWN hard drives.


    So they polled their own IT staff.

    >
    >> Unfortunately, there is a component of the population that refuses to
    >> accept things they cannot understand - a typically
    >> left-brain-dominant characteristic that derives from an ability to
    >> see the bigger picture. Techies are predominantly left-brain
    >> thinkers and as such, frequently express frustration when unable to
    >> understand WHY something happens. This is frequently manifest as an
    >> autistic-like, stubborn refusal to
    >> accept what they see before them - indeed, it can even be manifest as
    >> a need to prove the opposite of what they see before them, so irksome
    >> do they find their failure to understand.
    >> But then, left-brainers are not big on understanding because they
    >> lack the vision and imagination required to see the wood for the
    >> trees.
    >> Of the laptops I have to repair, I'd say 80-90% are down to failed
    >> HDD's. My desktop repairs have nothing like this failure rate.
    >>
    >> Draw your own conclusions.
    >>
    >>
    >>> Case #2 has 3 drives in it, two had a front mounted fan blowin air
    >>> over them (again from new), the third was buried in a 3.5" cage
    >>> under the floppy drive.
    >>> On this machine it was a drive in the fan air stream that died,
    >>> again at about 24 months.
    >>> Cases 3 to 7 didn't have any drive failures and none of those had a
    >>> fan blowing over the hard drives.
    >>>
    >>> Paul.
     
    Centre Parting, Apr 6, 2009
    #19
  20. muzician21

    Franc Zabkar Guest

    On Mon, 6 Apr 2009 11:24:53 +0100, "Centre Parting"
    <> put finger to keyboard and composed:

    >The Google study presumably polled a lot of PC users about HDD failures.


    The Google study concentrated on Google's own huge installed base of
    hard drives spanning several manufacturers, models, and generations.

    Nobody was polled.

    Failure Trends in a Large Disk Drive Population:
    http://research.google.com/archive/disk_failures.pdf

    - Franc Zabkar
    --
    Please remove one 'i' from my address when replying by email.
     
    Franc Zabkar, Apr 6, 2009
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. hoser
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    1,077
    hoser
    Apr 15, 2005
  2. =?Utf-8?B?RGF2aWQgUm9kcmlndWV6?=

    RE: Wanting Certification-Where to start

    =?Utf-8?B?RGF2aWQgUm9kcmlndWV6?=, Mar 26, 2006, in forum: MCSE
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    479
    =?Utf-8?B?RGF2aWQgUm9kcmlndWV6?=
    Mar 26, 2006
  3. =?Utf-8?B?TUNFIE1hZG5lc3M=?=

    Wanting Certification-Where to start

    =?Utf-8?B?TUNFIE1hZG5lc3M=?=, Mar 26, 2006, in forum: MCSE
    Replies:
    22
    Views:
    971
    Kline Sphere
    Mar 28, 2006
  4. Little Green Eyed Dragon

    Fire with fire

    Little Green Eyed Dragon, Aug 16, 2006, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    442
    Little Green Eyed Dragon
    Aug 16, 2006
  5. Walter Mautner
    Replies:
    8
    Views:
    826
    James
    Apr 14, 2007
Loading...

Share This Page