5 Excellent Downloadable eBooks To Teach Yourself Linux

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by victor, Aug 15, 2009.

  1. victor

    victor Guest

    victor, Aug 15, 2009
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. In message <h67bo6$v4o$-september.org>, victor wrote:

    > Here's a great resource for Max Burke and any others new to Linux.


    But do they want to learn, or are they only interested in insisting on how
    bad it is? Do they want to open their eyes, or just have their prejudices
    reinforced?
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Aug 16, 2009
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. victor

    Gordon Guest

    On 2009-08-15, Lawrence D'Oliveiro <_zealand> wrote:
    > In message <h67bo6$v4o$-september.org>, victor wrote:
    >
    >> Here's a great resource for Max Burke and any others new to Linux.

    >
    > But do they want to learn, or are they only interested in insisting on how
    > bad it is? Do they want to open their eyes, or just have their prejudices
    > reinforced?


    That sales pitch will sell/convert very few people.

    People what to be comfortable, take them outside their comfort zone and they
    will fight to get back inside it.

    What you need do is plant the seed, and walk away. It is their minds which
    need opening, not their eyes.

    I do love the situation where I put forward a point of view, only to have
    the same person tell me about how good it is, and how I should be a
    follower. I switch to their previos point of view and enjoy.
     
    Gordon, Aug 16, 2009
    #3
  4. victor

    Max Burke Guest

    Max Burke, Aug 16, 2009
    #4
  5. victor

    victor Guest

    Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    > In message <h67bo6$v4o$-september.org>, victor wrote:
    >
    >> Here's a great resource for Max Burke and any others new to Linux.

    >
    > But do they want to learn, or are they only interested in insisting on how
    > bad it is? Do they want to open their eyes, or just have their prejudices
    > reinforced?


    Who knows ?
    The longest journey begins with a single step.
     
    victor, Aug 16, 2009
    #5
  6. victor

    Nik Coughlin Guest

    "Lawrence D'Oliveiro" <_zealand> wrote in message
    news:h67f3t$22o$...
    > But do they want to learn, or are they only interested in insisting on how
    > bad it is? Do they want to open their eyes, or just have their prejudices
    > reinforced?


    You just described your attitude towards Windows perfectly. Psychologists
    call that projection Lawrence :p
     
    Nik Coughlin, Aug 17, 2009
    #6
  7. In message <h6a4ia$d5$-september.org>, Max Burke wrote:

    > It's a computer and an operating system. thats all.


    And reading and writing is just reading and writing, that's all. Like once
    you learn how to read and write, there's nothing new to learn about use of
    language, literary technique, ways to explain yourself better, new
    vocabulary, etc.

    WRONG!

    Same with computers. They are the universal machine: there's no end to the
    things they can do. We keep coming up with new tasks for them all the time.
    And more effective ways to do the same old things. If you don't keep up with
    that, you're just holding yourself back. Think of how employable your skills
    are, the uncertain state of today's job market, the absolutely pervasive and
    crucial presence of IT right through the entire modern economy ... need I
    say more?

    > My personal experiments (not experience note) with Linux/Ubuntu is that
    > it will not be a replacement for Windows for me. It simply doesn't do
    > what I need it to do and what I can already do on Windows XP.


    That's a sad thing to have to admit. Even Microsoft would rather you didn't
    use Windows XP any more. And if they are not its biggest supporter, who is?
    So who are you going to call for help? Looks like you and Woger will have to
    cling to each other as you slowly circle closer and closer to the
    plughole...
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Aug 17, 2009
    #7
  8. In message <h6a4ia$d5$-september.org>, Max Burke wrote:

    > Trouble is I dont know what is being updated and why it needs to be
    > updated because there little if any information about the update, other
    > than spending time finding forums/websites on the net and reading about
    > it first.


    It's weird, it's like the Linux in your parallel universe bears no
    resemblance to the one in our reality here.

    I just fired up the Update Manager in Ubuntu Jaunty on my Eee. Immediately
    it's showing me a list of "Important Security Updates". As I click on each
    one, info is displayed under two separate tabs, "Changes" and "Description",
    underneath. The latter is just the standard package description, but the
    former shows me what's new in this update.

    For instance, clicking on "firefox", under "Changes" I see

    * security/stability v3.0.13 (FIREFOX_3_0_13_RELEASE) - see USN-811-1

    That references an Ubuntu Security Notice which will give you more info,
    including the CVE ID for a full announcement about how this affect all
    releases of Firefox, not just the Ubuntu one.

    Or, a more obscure example, "libnspr4-0d" tells me it's a "New upstream
    version", with a link to a bug report in Launchpad that I can click, and a
    USN ID.

    In short, all the information is available for you right there, you just
    have to make use of it.
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Aug 17, 2009
    #8
  9. In message <h6ad46$l0t$-september.org>, Nik Coughlin wrote:

    > "Lawrence D'Oliveiro" <_zealand> wrote in message
    > news:h67f3t$22o$...
    >
    >> But do they want to learn, or are they only interested in insisting on
    >> how bad it is? Do they want to open their eyes, or just have their
    >> prejudices reinforced?

    >
    > You just described your attitude towards Windows perfectly.


    I know more about Windows than the most virulent anti-Linux trolls here know
    about Linux, and I've proved it
    <http://groups.google.co.nz/group/nz.comp/msg/db1a836f54fe6e86>. I believe
    if you're going to meaningfully criticize something, you should do so from a
    position of knowledge, not a position of ignorance. It's a position I don't
    just preach, it's a position I practise.

    > Psychologists call that projection Lawrence :p


    Interesting that you should be so preoccupied with trying to diagnose
    psychological issues in others. Have you been like this long?
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Aug 17, 2009
    #9
  10. victor

    Lodi Guest

    > Max Burke wrote:
    >
    > Why anyone using a computer sees that as some sort of 'life changing,
    > quasi religious' (as a large percentage of Linux users do) experience
    > is, well just weird IMO.


    I'm bored so I'll bite :)

    I don't think I've experienced the "quasi-religious" thing but have
    definitely experienced the "life-changing" thing.

    When I compare how I used to work, communicate or entertain myself back in
    my pre-computer days (mid-eighties) to how I do nowadays I can truthfully
    say computers have changed my life.

    What I consider weird is you saying that using a computer hasn't changed
    your life.

    >
    > It's a computer and an operating system. thats all.
    >

    A bit like me saying to my brother (a mechanic with thirty-plus years in the
    motor trade) "It's just a car. It gets me from A to B". True on one level
    but I understand why he takes no notice of me when I give an opinion on
    anything related to cars.

    I'm guessing you're a MS tweaking power user. You're actually the worst kind
    of linux newbie cos you require a whole lot of un-learning and a major
    change in mindset, unlike my 80 year old grannie who just powers up Ubuntu
    opens up Firefox and starts surfing. She doesn't compare MS software with
    what Ubuntu has installed. She just uses what's in front of her. Unlike the
    power user who once tweaked Nero 6.21 and (futilely) spends all morning
    trying to get K3B to do the same thing.

    Your hard-gained knowledge of MS is something to be proud of. But the fact
    that it's pretty much worthless when using Linux makes Linux that much more
    of a trial for you. You're always looking back. Not the best attitude for
    anyone wanting to learn something new.

    For the record (and for any Linux-curious reading this thread) there are
    just three Linux things you *have* to get your head around or you'll go
    crazy. Permissions, device/directory naming and

    > My personal experiments (not experience note) with Linux/Ubuntu is that
    > it will not be a replacement for Windows for me. It simply doesn't do
    > what I need it to do and what I can already do on Windows XP.
    >
    > Yeah I know it's NOT windows but it does NEED to be able to allow me to
    > use my computer as easily as Windows does if it's to be any sort of
    > replacement for Windows.
    >
    > IOW If it's to be a replacement for windows then it actually NEEDS to be
    > able to do what I already do in Windows.
    >
    > It doesn't.


    Trust me, it does. Unless you're running some seriously entrenched
    enterprise system Linux will do what you need, possibly not in a
    like-for-like manner but the end result will be the same as MS.

    Irregardless of what Impossible says, the average home user with maybe a
    website on the side or the average business with a couple of dozen
    employees can happily run Linux. Not saying there won't be the occasional
    hiccup but show me a MS system that is problem-free. (Can't speak for big
    companies i.e hundreds of employees, as I've had no first-hand dealings
    with them).
    >
    > Specifically the available graphics applications for Linux/Ubuntu dont
    > come close to cataloging/editing my photos collection like the freeware
    > Windows ones do that I currently use.


    I appreciate you're not asking for suggestions but, again, I'm thinking of
    the Linux-curious who may end up reading this thread. Hopefully they won't
    be discouraged by your lack of success.

    I'm a birthdays and christmas photo snapper at best so I don't have much to
    do with photo editing etc but....

    Photo Editors: from the "absolute basic" mtpaint (which I use) to "the way
    too complex for me" GIMP. Except for the "save to web" gimp plugin which I
    use constantly for downsizing and attaching jpgs to emails. And the
    Tools/ColorTools/Levels for brightening jpgs. Very easy to use.

    Photo Cataloging: from the basic "GThumb" or "GQview" (which I use) to
    the "really advanced and way too complex for me" Mapivi or this really
    in-depth webpage which makes my eyes blur over....
    http://tinyurl.com/qj4khd

    Here's the usual "windows to linux" webpage...
    http://www.linuxrsp.ru/win-lin-soft/table-eng.html

    >
    > Day to day system care/maintenance of Linux/Ubuntu simply does match the
    > easy daily system care/maintenance of Windows.
    > I'm talking about things like daily backups. In Windows it takes 10 to
    > 15 minutes (mostly automatic) and I know that the backups are exactly
    > what I need to backup, and I can easily reconfigure those backups down
    > to selecting/changing individual files if required.
    >
    > Cant do that in Linux/Ubuntu at least not that I've been able to find.


    Really surprised the Simple Backup Suite didn't win you over. It does what
    it says. And it's absolutely simple to use and modify. Point and click.

    To install......
    sudo apt-get install sbackup

    A HowTo.....
    http://tinyurl.com/o7d2lx

    .....note that the restored file now keeps its original owner and doesn't
    default to root as mentioned in the HowTo. Developers responded to users.

    >
    > Keeping the OS up to date. Windows is a lot easier to keep up to date
    > and I know what is being updated and why because Microsoft and third
    > parties provide that information with the updates, which makes it easier
    > to decide if I need to install the update or not.
    >
    > Linux/Ubuntu nearly every time/day I start it it immediately tells me it
    > has updates available that I should install and they're often some sort
    > of security update.
    >
    > (Yeah I know it can be turned off.)
    >
    > Trouble is I dont know what is being updated and why it needs to be
    > updated because there little if any information about the update, other
    > than spending time finding forums/websites on the net and reading about
    > it first.
    >
    > If I dont know what the update is for then how can I decide if I need to
    > or should allow it to be installed.


    Strange to complain about an operating system being maintained.

    I only turn on updates once a week-ish but normally I just accept all
    critical or security updates and then have a quick look through whatever
    else is listed. Hasn't steered me wrong (yet). If any programme updates
    catch my eye I'll install them but I know it's no big deal as the entire
    operating system is updated every six months (not every three or four
    years) and the programme developers work to the same schedule. A few months
    using KTorrent 3.0 as opposed to 3.2 is no big deal.

    >
    > So Linux/Ubuntu is mildly interesting to play around with and learn
    > about another OS, but for the day to day use of an ordinary Windows
    > computer user it just cant cut it as a replacement. (for me)
    >


    Ultimately, that's all that matters. Getting things done i.e productivity.

    But don't forget the other variables e.g cost, security, stability and
    support. All things which are down to the operating system and all areas in
    which Linux easily equals MS.

    Productivity is the key area of difference for you and that's pretty much
    always down to the user, not the OS. You are more productive using MS. Good
    for you. Ubuntu running KDE does what I need with minimum effort.

    Regards
    Lodi

    PS I've definitely been reading this group for too long cos I can
    practically write an Impossible response to this post. Her usual cliches.
    Crap analogies, freetard mentality, real businesses use real software
    etc.....
     
    Lodi, Aug 17, 2009
    #10
  11. victor

    Enkidu Guest

    Max Burke wrote:
    > victor wrote:
    >> Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >>> In message <h67bo6$v4o$-september.org>, victor
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Here's a great resource for Max Burke and any others new to
    >>>> Linux.
    >>>
    >>> But do they want to learn, or are they only interested in
    >>> insisting on how bad it is? Do they want to open their eyes, or
    >>> just have their prejudices reinforced?

    >>
    >> Who knows ? The longest journey begins with a single step.

    >
    > Only if you see it as a 'journey.' Why anyone using a computer sees
    > that as some sort of 'life changing, quasi religious' (as a large
    > percentage of Linux users do) experience is, well just weird IMO.
    >
    > It's a computer and an operating system. thats all.
    >
    > My personal experiments (not experience note) with Linux/Ubuntu is
    > that it will not be a replacement for Windows for me. It simply
    > doesn't do what I need it to do and what I can already do on Windows
    > XP.
    >
    > Yeah I know it's NOT windows but it does NEED to be able to allow me
    > to use my computer as easily as Windows does if it's to be any sort
    > of replacement for Windows.
    >
    > IOW If it's to be a replacement for windows then it actually NEEDS to
    > be able to do what I already do in Windows.
    >
    > It doesn't.
    >
    > Specifically the available graphics applications for Linux/Ubuntu
    > dont come close to cataloging/editing my photos collection like the
    > freeware Windows ones do that I currently use.
    >

    What do you use on Windows, Max? I currently don't do anything but dump
    the photos in a directory by date. At some time I want to look for a
    Linux prog that works something like Flickr.
    >
    > Day to day system care/maintenance of Linux/Ubuntu simply does match
    > the easy daily system care/maintenance of Windows. I'm talking about
    > things like daily backups. In Windows it takes 10 to 15 minutes
    > (mostly automatic) and I know that the backups are exactly what I
    > need to backup, and I can easily reconfigure those backups down to
    > selecting/changing individual files if required.
    >

    What Windows backups? There's no GUI backup on Windows that I know of,
    and I spent some time looking for one at one time. I ended up with a
    number of horrible scripts that ran Backup and Robocopy and other
    programs just to get a decent backup.

    Liekwise, I've ended up with a number of scripts to backup what I wanted
    on Linux - mostly /home directories, /etc and a package listing,
    database dumps and a tar backup of most stuff in case of real disasters.

    I don't think either is easy to backup.
    >
    > Cant do that in Linux/Ubuntu at least not that I've been able to
    > find. The only option is to backup the complete install taking an
    > hour or so in Windows, or only parts of the install without the
    > option of deciding what to back up...
    >
    > Keeping the OS up to date. Windows is a lot easier to keep up to date
    > and I know what is being updated and why because Microsoft and third
    > parties provide that information with the updates, which makes it
    > easier to decide if I need to install the update or not.
    >

    What tool do you use? Synaptic will show you what the update is for. It
    may even contain a link to the bug report.
    >
    > Linux/Ubuntu nearly every time/day I start it it immediately tells me
    > it has updates available that I should install and they're often some
    > sort of security update.
    >
    > (Yeah I know it can be turned off.)
    >
    > Trouble is I dont know what is being updated and why it needs to be
    > updated because there little if any information about the update,
    > other than spending time finding forums/websites on the net and
    > reading about it first.
    >

    Same as in Windows. Install all security updates. I also install *any*
    update, same as in Windows. Incidentally, how do you get your
    information about Windows updates? I don't usually know what Windows
    updates gets installed.
    >
    > If I dont know what the update is for then how can I decide if I need
    > to or should allow it to be installed.
    >

    Both in Windows and in Linux I usually just install 'em.
    >
    > So Linux/Ubuntu is mildly interesting to play around with and learn
    > about another OS, but for the day to day use of an ordinary Windows
    > computer user it just cant cut it as a replacement. (for me)
    >

    Cheers,

    Cliff

    --

    The Internet is interesting in that although the nicknames may change,
    the same old personalities show through.
     
    Enkidu, Aug 17, 2009
    #11
  12. victor

    Max Burke Guest

    Enkidu wrote:
    > Max Burke wrote:


    snip

    >> Specifically the available graphics applications for Linux/Ubuntu
    >> dont come close to cataloging/editing my photos collection like the
    >> freeware Windows ones do that I currently use.


    > What do you use on Windows, Max? I currently don't do anything but dump
    > the photos in a directory by date. At some time I want to look for a
    > Linux prog that works something like Flickr.


    Faststone Image viewer as photo cataloger.
    http://www.faststone.org/

    it's cataloging over 15 years of photos, 10GB+, 31,000 jpg image files
    on one external USB drive, and 49GB+, 80,000+ jpg image files on another
    external USB drive with ease.
    It also has a very good bulk file renamer built in, and a good graphics
    editing option for quick editing of images.

    It fast, reliable, and free. I'll admit most other windows cataloger
    programmes like Picasa from Google, and XnView just dont cut it either...

    I tried getting it to run in Wine on Ubuntu, it installed without any
    problems, but just wouldn't run.

    I also use IrFanview for quick image editing, but my main graphics
    editor is Photoshop Elements.

    >> Day to day system care/maintenance of Linux/Ubuntu simply does match
    >> the easy daily system care/maintenance of Windows. I'm talking about
    >> things like daily backups. In Windows it takes 10 to 15 minutes
    >> (mostly automatic) and I know that the backups are exactly what I
    >> need to backup, and I can easily reconfigure those backups down to
    >> selecting/changing individual files if required.


    > What Windows backups? There's no GUI backup on Windows that I know of,


    NTBackup.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NTBackup
    I have set it up to run a automatic System State backup daily.

    I also use Syncback to run and automatic daily incremental/file compare
    backup of my computer.

    Both run in the background and I can continue using the computer while
    they're running.

    The Only manual backup I do is for Firefox and Thunderbird using MozBackup.

    > and I spent some time looking for one at one time. I ended up with a
    > number of horrible scripts that ran Backup and Robocopy and other
    > programs just to get a decent backup.


    > Liekwise, I've ended up with a number of scripts to backup what I wanted
    > on Linux - mostly /home directories, /etc and a package listing,
    > database dumps and a tar backup of most stuff in case of real disasters.
    >
    > I don't think either is easy to backup.


    >> Cant do that in Linux/Ubuntu at least not that I've been able to
    >> find. The only option is to backup the complete install taking an
    >> hour or so in Windows, or only parts of the install without the
    >> option of deciding what to back up...


    >> Keeping the OS up to date. Windows is a lot easier to keep up to date
    >> and I know what is being updated and why because Microsoft and third
    >> parties provide that information with the updates, which makes it
    >> easier to decide if I need to install the update or not.


    > What tool do you use? Synaptic will show you what the update is for. It
    > may even contain a link to the bug report.


    The Update manager.

    >> Linux/Ubuntu nearly every time/day I start it it immediately tells me
    >> it has updates available that I should install and they're often some
    >> sort of security update.
    >> (Yeah I know it can be turned off.)
    >> Trouble is I dont know what is being updated and why it needs to be
    >> updated because there little if any information about the update,
    >> other than spending time finding forums/websites on the net and
    >> reading about it first.


    > Same as in Windows. Install all security updates. I also install *any*
    > update, same as in Windows. Incidentally, how do you get your
    > information about Windows updates? I don't usually know what Windows
    > updates gets installed.


    Windows Update has a brief description of each update and a URL to the
    MS update page describing what the issue is, what the update fixes, exc..

    Most third party updates also have similar information available with
    the update.

    >> If I dont know what the update is for then how can I decide if I need
    >> to or should allow it to be installed.


    > Both in Windows and in Linux I usually just install 'em.


    >> So Linux/Ubuntu is mildly interesting to play around with and learn
    >> about another OS, but for the day to day use of an ordinary Windows
    >> computer user it just cant cut it as a replacement. (for me)



    --

    Replace the obvious with paradise.net to email me
    Found Images
    http://homepages.paradise.net.nz/~mlvburke
     
    Max Burke, Aug 17, 2009
    #12
  13. victor

    Enkidu Guest

    Max Burke wrote:
    > Enkidu wrote:
    >> Max Burke wrote:

    >
    > snip
    >
    >>> Specifically the available graphics applications for Linux/Ubuntu
    >>> dont come close to cataloging/editing my photos collection like
    >>> the freeware Windows ones do that I currently use.

    >
    >> What do you use on Windows, Max? I currently don't do anything but
    >> dump the photos in a directory by date. At some time I want to look
    >> for a Linux prog that works something like Flickr.

    >
    > Faststone Image viewer as photo cataloger. http://www.faststone.org/
    >
    > it's cataloging over 15 years of photos, 10GB+, 31,000 jpg image
    > files on one external USB drive, and 49GB+, 80,000+ jpg image files
    > on another external USB drive with ease. It also has a very good bulk
    > file renamer built in, and a good graphics editing option for quick
    > editing of images.
    >
    > It fast, reliable, and free. I'll admit most other windows cataloger
    > programmes like Picasa from Google, and XnView just dont cut it
    > either...
    >
    > I tried getting it to run in Wine on Ubuntu, it installed without any
    > problems, but just wouldn't run.
    >
    > I also use IrFanview for quick image editing, but my main graphics
    > editor is Photoshop Elements.
    >

    Ah Irfaview. Yes. Definitely. Photoshop Elements, no way. I don't like
    the way it seems to change the colour balance or something. I'vesliced
    and diced with the full Photoshop which seems a very different beast.

    Have a look at Imagemagick. Windows and Linux, command line tool, but
    very very powerful. If you want to, for example, lay a watermark on top
    of a picture, or maybe attach labels to part of an image, that's yer
    tool. Or if you want to reduce the size of a whole bunch of images for
    Internet publishing, or convert from format X to format Y, the same tool
    (actually its a set of a number of tools). I usually have to fiddle a
    bit but it usually does the job.
    >
    >>> Day to day system care/maintenance of Linux/Ubuntu simply does
    >>> match the easy daily system care/maintenance of Windows. I'm
    >>> talking about things like daily backups. In Windows it takes 10
    >>> to 15 minutes (mostly automatic) and I know that the backups are
    >>> exactly what I need to backup, and I can easily reconfigure those
    >>> backups down to selecting/changing individual files if required.
    >>>

    >
    >> What Windows backups? There's no GUI backup on Windows that I know
    >> of,

    >
    > NTBackup. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NTBackup I have set it up to
    > run a automatic System State backup daily.
    >

    Ugh! Nasty tool, with some nasty quirks that I had to write batch files
    to get around. It used to write its logs in a weird and wonderful
    location and overwrote it every night. Much of the batch file processing
    was about picking up the logs and saving them somewhere else for audit
    purposes. And there is never a good reason for a system state backup by
    itself.
    >
    > I also use Syncback to run and automatic daily incremental/file
    > compare backup of my computer.
    >
    > Both run in the background and I can continue using the computer
    > while they're running.
    >
    > The Only manual backup I do is for Firefox and Thunderbird using
    > MozBackup.
    >
    >> and I spent some time looking for one at one time. I ended up with
    >> a number of horrible scripts that ran Backup and Robocopy and other
    >> programs just to get a decent backup.

    >
    >> Liekwise, I've ended up with a number of scripts to backup what I
    >> wanted on Linux - mostly /home directories, /etc and a package
    >> listing, database dumps and a tar backup of most stuff in case of
    >> real disasters.
    >>
    >> I don't think either is easy to backup.

    >
    >>> Cant do that in Linux/Ubuntu at least not that I've been able to
    >>> find. The only option is to backup the complete install taking
    >>> an hour or so in Windows, or only parts of the install without
    >>> the option of deciding what to back up...

    >
    >>> Keeping the OS up to date. Windows is a lot easier to keep up to
    >>> date and I know what is being updated and why because Microsoft
    >>> and third parties provide that information with the updates,
    >>> which makes it easier to decide if I need to install the update
    >>> or not.

    >
    >> What tool do you use? Synaptic will show you what the update is
    >> for. It may even contain a link to the bug report.

    >
    > The Update manager.
    >

    I'm sure that this a) gives you the chance to pick and choose, b) gives
    you a summary of what the fix is for.
    >
    >>> Linux/Ubuntu nearly every time/day I start it it immediately
    >>> tells me it has updates available that I should install and
    >>> they're often some sort of security update. (Yeah I know it can
    >>> be turned off.) Trouble is I dont know what is being updated and
    >>> why it needs to be updated because there little if any
    >>> information about the update, other than spending time finding
    >>> forums/websites on the net and reading about it first.

    >
    >> Same as in Windows. Install all security updates. I also install
    >> *any* update, same as in Windows. Incidentally, how do you get your
    >> information about Windows updates? I don't usually know what
    >> Windows updates gets installed.

    >
    > Windows Update has a brief description of each update and a URL to
    > the MS update page describing what the issue is, what the update
    > fixes, exc..
    >
    > Most third party updates also have similar information available with
    > the update.
    >
    >>> If I dont know what the update is for then how can I decide if I
    >>> need to or should allow it to be installed.

    >
    >> Both in Windows and in Linux I usually just install 'em.

    >
    >>> So Linux/Ubuntu is mildly interesting to play around with and
    >>> learn about another OS, but for the day to day use of an ordinary
    >>> Windows computer user it just cant cut it as a replacement. (for
    >>> me)

    >

    Cheers,

    Cliff

    --

    The Internet is interesting in that although the nicknames may change,
    the same old personalities show through.
     
    Enkidu, Aug 17, 2009
    #13
  14. victor

    Lodi Guest

    > Max Burke wrote:
    >
    > Faststone Image viewer as photo cataloger.
    > http://www.faststone.org/
    >
    > it's cataloging over 15 years of photos, 10GB+, 31,000 jpg image files
    > on one external USB drive, and 49GB+, 80,000+ jpg image files on another
    > external USB drive with ease.
    > It also has a very good bulk file renamer built in, and a good graphics
    > editing option for quick editing of images.
    >
    > It fast, reliable, and free. I'll admit most other windows cataloger
    > programmes like Picasa from Google, and XnView just dont cut it either...
    >



    Ummmm...Max. If you haven't already, just ignore my post. Your photo
    requirements are way beyond anything I've ever come across. Storing
    100,000-plus jpg's is mind-blowing. When do you ever get the time to look
    at them.

    Would love to see you and Faststone in action and then (for form's sake) try
    and replicate it in Linux.

    Regards
    Lodi
     
    Lodi, Aug 17, 2009
    #14
  15. victor

    Lodi Guest

    > On Aug 17, 7:40 pm, Lodi <> wrote:

    > Ummmm...Max. If you haven't already, just ignore my earlier post. Your photo
    > requirements are way beyond anything I've ever come across. Storing
    > 100,000-plus jpg's is mind-blowing. When do you ever get the time to look
    > at them.
    >
    > Would love to see you and Faststone in action and then (for form's sake) try
    > and replicate it in Linux.
    >
    > Regards
    > Lodi


    Using Ubuntu 9.04
    Just installed FastStone Image Viewer 3.9 via Wine 1.1.27
    Installed fine and viewing fine. Admittedly I've only got a few
    hundred jpgs to view but it's pretty effortless.

    Very nice viewer. Very quick as well. Lots of scope from basic viewing
    to serious editing. Impressive.
    A bit more than I need. I'm happy with GQview.

    Regards
    Lodi
     
    Lodi, Aug 17, 2009
    #15
  16. victor

    Woger Guest

    5 Excellent Downloadable eBooks To Teach Yourself how to become Insane.

    Do I need to say any more..??
     
    Woger, Aug 17, 2009
    #16
  17. victor

    victor Guest

    Max Burke wrote:
    > victor wrote:
    >> Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >>> In message <h67bo6$v4o$-september.org>, victor wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Here's a great resource for Max Burke and any others new to Linux.
    >>>
    >>> But do they want to learn, or are they only interested in insisting
    >>> on how bad it is? Do they want to open their eyes, or just have their
    >>> prejudices reinforced?

    >>
    >> Who knows ?
    >> The longest journey begins with a single step.

    >
    > Only if you see it as a 'journey.'
    > Why anyone using a computer sees that as some sort of 'life changing,
    > quasi religious' (as a large percentage of Linux users do) experience
    > is, well just weird IMO.
    >
    > It's a computer and an operating system. thats all.
    >

    Exactly.
    It can do a lot of things if you learn how.
    If you can't play a piano it doesn't mean there is something wrong with
    pianos.
    It means you need to start learning if you want that piano to be any use.
     
    victor, Aug 17, 2009
    #17
  18. victor

    victor Guest

    Re: 5 Excellent Downloadable eBooks To Teach Yourself how to becomeInsane.

    Woger wrote:
    > Do I need to say any more..??
    >


    We already knew you had nothing to offer.
    You never do.
     
    victor, Aug 17, 2009
    #18
  19. victor

    Max Burke Guest

    Lodi wrote:
    >> Max Burke wrote:
    >>
    >> Faststone Image viewer as photo cataloger.
    >> http://www.faststone.org/
    >>
    >> it's cataloging over 15 years of photos, 10GB+, 31,000 jpg image files
    >> on one external USB drive, and 49GB+, 80,000+ jpg image files on another
    >> external USB drive with ease.
    >> It also has a very good bulk file renamer built in, and a good graphics
    >> editing option for quick editing of images.
    >>
    >> It fast, reliable, and free. I'll admit most other windows cataloger
    >> programmes like Picasa from Google, and XnView just dont cut it either...
    >>


    > Ummmm...Max. If you haven't already, just ignore my post. Your photo
    > requirements are way beyond anything I've ever come across. Storing
    > 100,000-plus jpg's is mind-blowing. When do you ever get the time to look
    > at them.




    > Would love to see you and Faststone in action and then (for form's sake) try
    > and replicate it in Linux.


    You never run out of film with digital cameras... ;-)

    I did try to get it to run in Linux/Ubuntu/Wine. It installed OK but
    just wouldn't run.

    --

    Replace the obvious with paradise.net to email me
    Found Images
    http://homepages.paradise.net.nz/~mlvburke
     
    Max Burke, Aug 17, 2009
    #19
  20. victor

    Max Burke Guest

    Lodi wrote:
    >> On Aug 17, 7:40 pm, Lodi <> wrote:

    >
    >> Ummmm...Max. If you haven't already, just ignore my earlier post. Your photo
    >> requirements are way beyond anything I've ever come across. Storing
    >> 100,000-plus jpg's is mind-blowing. When do you ever get the time to look
    >> at them.
    >>
    >> Would love to see you and Faststone in action and then (for form's sake) try
    >> and replicate it in Linux.
    >>
    >> Regards
    >> Lodi

    >
    > Using Ubuntu 9.04
    > Just installed FastStone Image Viewer 3.9 via Wine 1.1.27
    > Installed fine and viewing fine. Admittedly I've only got a few
    > hundred jpgs to view but it's pretty effortless.
    >
    > Very nice viewer. Very quick as well. Lots of scope from basic viewing
    > to serious editing. Impressive.
    > A bit more than I need. I'm happy with GQview.


    > Regards
    > Lodi


    Maybe I should try it again...

    --

    Replace the obvious with paradise.net to email me
    Found Images
    http://homepages.paradise.net.nz/~mlvburke
     
    Max Burke, Aug 17, 2009
    #20
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