4 gig flash drive out about the time of vista....

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by thingy, Jul 26, 2006.

  1. thingy

    thingy Guest

    thingy, Jul 26, 2006
    #1
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  2. thingy

    SNOman Guest

    SNOman, Jul 27, 2006
    #2
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  3. thingy

    thingy Guest

    SNOman wrote:
    > thingy wrote:
    >
    >> http://www.tgdaily.com/2006/07/26/samsung_announces_4gb_ssd/
    >>
    >> Now that is one for me....probably be silly money though....
    >>
    >> :(
    >>
    >> Still the price will drop....
    >>
    >> Get two, one for boot one for /var....
    >>
    >> :D
    >>
    >> regards
    >>
    >> Thing

    >
    > Only 4
    >
    > http://www.reghardware.co.uk/2006/04/07/kanguru_pricey_64gb_flash_disk/
    >
    > http://www.reghardware.co.uk/2006/03/21/samsung_unveils_ssd/



    For / and /var 4 gig flash is probably enough in fact I would split one
    in two, 2 gig for / and 2 gig for /tmp or 1gig for / and 3 gig for /tmp
    if I had lots of users......

    regards

    Thing
    thingy, Jul 27, 2006
    #3
  4. thingy

    Allistar Guest

    thingy wrote:

    > SNOman wrote:
    >> thingy wrote:
    >>
    >>> http://www.tgdaily.com/2006/07/26/samsung_announces_4gb_ssd/
    >>>
    >>> Now that is one for me....probably be silly money though....
    >>>
    >>> :(
    >>>
    >>> Still the price will drop....
    >>>
    >>> Get two, one for boot one for /var....
    >>>
    >>> :D
    >>>
    >>> regards
    >>>
    >>> Thing

    >>
    >> Only 4
    >>
    >> http://www.reghardware.co.uk/2006/04/07/kanguru_pricey_64gb_flash_disk/
    >>
    >> http://www.reghardware.co.uk/2006/03/21/samsung_unveils_ssd/

    >
    >
    > For / and /var 4 gig flash is probably enough in fact I would split one
    > in two, 2 gig for / and 2 gig for /tmp or 1gig for / and 3 gig for /tmp
    > if I had lots of users......
    >
    > regards
    >
    > Thing


    Only if you also have /usr in a separate partition too. I tend to prefer 8Gb
    for /, 4Gb for /usr and 10Gb for /usr/portage (running Gentoo) and whatever
    I can chuck at /home.

    Allistar.
    Allistar, Jul 27, 2006
    #4
  5. thingy

    JohnO Guest

    thingy wrote:
    > http://www.tgdaily.com/2006/07/26/samsung_announces_4gb_ssd/
    >
    > Now that is one for me....probably be silly money though....
    >
    > :(
    >
    > Still the price will drop....
    >
    > Get two, one for boot one for /var....
    >
    > :D
    >
    > regards
    >
    > Thing


    Why would it be silly money? 1Gb flash drives are under $100 already?
    JohnO, Jul 27, 2006
    #5
  6. thingy

    thingy Guest

    JohnO wrote:
    > thingy wrote:
    >
    >>http://www.tgdaily.com/2006/07/26/samsung_announces_4gb_ssd/
    >>
    >>Now that is one for me....probably be silly money though....
    >>
    >:mad:
    >>
    >>Still the price will drop....
    >>
    >>Get two, one for boot one for /var....
    >>
    >>:D
    >>
    >>regards
    >>
    >>Thing

    >
    >
    > Why would it be silly money? 1Gb flash drives are under $100 already?
    >


    Performance and number of writes....my undertsnading is the stuff that
    goes into cameras has a quite limited amount of writes, which is good
    enough for cameras but not good enough for an OS partition, especially
    logging....so existing cards might be OK for static partitons like /usr....

    regards

    Thing
    thingy, Jul 27, 2006
    #6
  7. thingy wrote:
    > >>http://www.tgdaily.com/2006/07/26/samsung_announces_4gb_ssd/
    > >>
    > >>Now that is one for me....probably be silly money though....
    > >>
    > >:mad:
    > >>
    > >>Still the price will drop....
    > >>
    > >>Get two, one for boot one for /var....
    > >>
    > >>:D
    > >>
    > >>regards
    > >>
    > >>Thing

    > >
    > >
    > > Why would it be silly money? 1Gb flash drives are under $100 already?
    > >

    >
    > Performance and number of writes....my undertsnading is the stuff that
    > goes into cameras has a quite limited amount of writes, which is good
    > enough for cameras but not good enough for an OS partition, especially
    > logging....so existing cards might be OK for static partitons like /usr....


    FWIW Windows Vista ReadyBoost & ReadyDrive
    http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/system/sysperf/accelerator.mspx has an
    algorithm that chunks data up as its written to the flash media to
    ensure that the device doesn't wear out

    We are smart about how and when we do our writes to the device. Our
    research shows that we will get at least 10+ years out of flash devices
    that we support.

    Regards
    Nathan
    Nathan Mercer, Jul 27, 2006
    #7
  8. thingy

    thingy Guest

    Nathan Mercer wrote:
    > thingy wrote:
    >
    >>>>http://www.tgdaily.com/2006/07/26/samsung_announces_4gb_ssd/
    >>>>
    >>>>Now that is one for me....probably be silly money though....
    >>>>
    >>>:mad:
    >>>>
    >>>>Still the price will drop....
    >>>>
    >>>>Get two, one for boot one for /var....
    >>>>
    >>>>:D
    >>>>
    >>>>regards
    >>>>
    >>>>Thing
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>Why would it be silly money? 1Gb flash drives are under $100 already?
    >>>

    >>
    >>Performance and number of writes....my undertsnading is the stuff that
    >>goes into cameras has a quite limited amount of writes, which is good
    >>enough for cameras but not good enough for an OS partition, especially
    >>logging....so existing cards might be OK for static partitons like /usr....

    >
    >
    > FWIW Windows Vista ReadyBoost & ReadyDrive
    > http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/system/sysperf/accelerator.mspx has an
    > algorithm that chunks data up as its written to the flash media to
    > ensure that the device doesn't wear out
    >
    > We are smart about how and when we do our writes to the device. Our
    > research shows that we will get at least 10+ years out of flash devices
    > that we support.
    >
    > Regards
    > Nathan
    >


    Ah ok.....thought maybe this was substantially better stuff, rather than
    a work around, however effective.....

    and what about fragmentation? and its in he background cleanups, turned
    off for these drives?

    10 years+ is a decent safety margin.....given the rate of change after
    or 3 I'd expect the wearing out to be no longer an issue.....

    Quite why you could not do this in hardware on the disk itself I dont
    know....

    regards

    thing
    thingy, Jul 27, 2006
    #8
  9. thingy

    thingy Guest

    Allistar wrote:
    > thingy wrote:
    >
    >
    >>SNOman wrote:
    >>
    >>>thingy wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>http://www.tgdaily.com/2006/07/26/samsung_announces_4gb_ssd/
    >>>>
    >>>>Now that is one for me....probably be silly money though....
    >>>>
    >>>:mad:
    >>>>
    >>>>Still the price will drop....
    >>>>
    >>>>Get two, one for boot one for /var....
    >>>>
    >>>>:D
    >>>>
    >>>>regards
    >>>>
    >>>>Thing
    >>>
    >>>Only 4
    >>>
    >>>http://www.reghardware.co.uk/2006/04/07/kanguru_pricey_64gb_flash_disk/
    >>>
    >>>http://www.reghardware.co.uk/2006/03/21/samsung_unveils_ssd/

    >>
    >>
    >>For / and /var 4 gig flash is probably enough in fact I would split one
    >>in two, 2 gig for / and 2 gig for /tmp or 1gig for / and 3 gig for /tmp
    >>if I had lots of users......
    >>
    >>regards
    >>
    >>Thing

    >
    >
    > Only if you also have /usr in a separate partition too. I tend to prefer 8Gb
    > for /, 4Gb for /usr and 10Gb for /usr/portage (running Gentoo) and whatever
    > I can chuck at /home.
    >
    > Allistar.


    Depends on the distro i think. I pretty much alwys do /usr as seperate
    unless Im cramped for disk space then I do / and /usr the same.....say
    on a 9 or 18 gig drive....

    RH wants around 6gig for /usr with a full install so i tend to set 8 gig
    with 1 or 2 gig for / which seems enough....I notice debian has
    different requirements so / tends to be made bigger and /usr smaller....

    Depending on your use, I would suggest you seperate /tmp off as well as
    /var/log as these are loging partitions....I have seen a 14 gig /var
    fill overnight...then redhat logs to /tmp so that gets filled...once
    full on /var you cannot remotely login....depends on if that is an issue
    for you or not.

    regards

    Thing
    thingy, Jul 27, 2006
    #9
  10. thingy wrote:

    > Nathan Mercer wrote:
    > > thingy wrote:
    > >
    > >>>>http://www.tgdaily.com/2006/07/26/samsung_announces_4gb_ssd/
    > >>>>
    > >>>>Now that is one for me....probably be silly money though....
    > >>>>
    > >>>:mad:
    > >>>>
    > >>>>Still the price will drop....
    > >>>>
    > >>>>Get two, one for boot one for /var....
    > >>>>
    > >>>>:D
    > >>>>
    > >>>>regards
    > >>>>
    > >>>>Thing
    > >>>
    > >>>
    > >>>Why would it be silly money? 1Gb flash drives are under $100 already?
    > >>>
    > >>
    > >>Performance and number of writes....my undertsnading is the stuff that
    > >>goes into cameras has a quite limited amount of writes, which is good
    > >>enough for cameras but not good enough for an OS partition, especially
    > >>logging....so existing cards might be OK for static partitons like /usr....

    > >
    > >
    > > FWIW Windows Vista ReadyBoost & ReadyDrive
    > > http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/system/sysperf/accelerator.mspx has an
    > > algorithm that chunks data up as its written to the flash media to
    > > ensure that the device doesn't wear out
    > >
    > > We are smart about how and when we do our writes to the device. Our
    > > research shows that we will get at least 10+ years out of flash devices
    > > that we support.
    > >
    > > Regards
    > > Nathan
    > >

    >
    > Ah ok.....thought maybe this was substantially better stuff, rather than
    > a work around, however effective.....
    >
    > and what about fragmentation? and its in he background cleanups, turned


    Not a problem the unique write gathering algorithm optimizes
    performance and wear patterns and doesn't suffer from frag

    > off for these drives?


    correct

    > 10 years+ is a decent safety margin.....given the rate of change after


    Some of the projected device wear test we have done put it out to 1823
    years (!) depending on device size, variant, and usage patterns

    > or 3 I'd expect the wearing out to be no longer an issue.....


    Yes I think you're likely to have lost your device or the storage space
    will be irrelevant by then

    > Quite why you could not do this in hardware on the disk itself I dont
    > know....


    We do actually do both.

    ReadyDrive is the Hybrid Hard Drive where Nonvolatile cache (NV Cache)
    is added to the hard disk drive which allows data to be read and
    written while platter is spun down
    Also improves battery life and startup speed as data in cache persisted
    when powered down. Other benefits are Performance (Faster boot, faster
    hibernate/resume) Reliability (vibration and impact doesn't affect NV)
    and reduced noise

    and then ReadyBoost if for Expanded Memory Devices with works with
    External USB keys, SD cards, Compact Flash, internal PCIe cards

    Its all about avoiding the disk bottleneck, the slowest thing in a PC,
    the thing that really hasn't changed much in the last 10 years -
    ReadyDrive/ReadyBoost allows fast reads to satisfy page faults when
    page is not in main memory. These are up to 10x faster than random HDD
    reads because the latency for USB Flash Drive ~0.8 mSec

    This is a cool technology that improves performance and reduces power
    usage for Windows Vista Mobile PCs

    And "they" claim MSFT doesn't innovate...

    Cheers
    Nathan
    Nathan Mercer, Jul 27, 2006
    #10
  11. thingy

    MaHogany Guest

    On Thu, 27 Jul 2006 02:45:34 -0700, Nathan Mercer wrote:

    > This is a cool technology that improves performance and reduces power
    > usage for Windows Vista Mobile PCs
    >
    > And "they" claim MSFT doesn't innovate...


    LOL!

    I'll bite.

    Nothing new there - merely a disc cache.

    You're right - there has been nothing new with disc writing technology for
    about 10 years - until recently when one of the manufacturers invented
    vertical storage.


    Ma Hogany

    --
    Q: How do I make Windows(TM) go faster?
    A: Throw it harder...
    MaHogany, Jul 27, 2006
    #11
  12. In message <>, thingy wrote:

    > Allistar wrote:
    >> thingy wrote:

    >
    >>>For / and /var 4 gig flash is probably enough in fact I would split one
    >>>in two, 2 gig for / and 2 gig for /tmp or 1gig for / and 3 gig for /tmp
    >>>if I had lots of users......

    >>
    >> Only if you also have /usr in a separate partition too. I tend to prefer
    >> 8Gb for /, 4Gb for /usr and 10Gb for /usr/portage (running Gentoo) and
    >> whatever I can chuck at /home.

    >
    > Depends on the distro i think. I pretty much alwys do /usr as seperate
    > unless Im cramped for disk space then I do / and /usr the same.....say
    > on a 9 or 18 gig drive....
    >
    > RH wants around 6gig for /usr with a full install so i tend to set 8 gig
    > with 1 or 2 gig for / which seems enough....I notice debian has
    > different requirements so / tends to be made bigger and /usr smaller....


    Why put /usr on a separate partition at all? I would never bother.

    > Depending on your use, I would suggest you seperate /tmp off as well as
    > /var/log as these are loging partitions....I have seen a 14 gig /var
    > fill overnight...


    My solution to /var/log filling up is not to put it on a separate partition
    at all. Instead, it becomes a symlink to /home/overflow/var/log. I've also
    done a similar thing for /var/lib/mysql, where necessary.

    This way I avoid creating extra partitions. The fewer partitions you have,
    the more flexibility you have.

    And remember, unlike Dimdows, you have less of a worry about
    fragmentation. :)
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Jul 27, 2006
    #12
  13. "Out about the time of Vista", indeed!

    That's like saying Samsung is going to keep hitting delays in trying to
    ship, until they start dropping previously-announced features just to get
    something out the door before the heat-death of the Universe. :)
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Jul 27, 2006
    #13
  14. MaHogany wrote:

    > On Thu, 27 Jul 2006 02:45:34 -0700, Nathan Mercer wrote:
    >
    > > This is a cool technology that improves performance and reduces power
    > > usage for Windows Vista Mobile PCs
    > >
    > > And "they" claim MSFT doesn't innovate...

    >
    > LOL!
    >
    > I'll bite.
    >
    > Nothing new there - merely a disc cache.


    Who else has a similar feature?
    Can you point us at some one else who does the things I described in
    the prior post?

    Regards
    Nathan
    Nathan Mercer, Jul 27, 2006
    #14
  15. thingy

    thingy Guest

    Nathan Mercer wrote:
    > thingy wrote:
    >
    >> Nathan Mercer wrote:
    >>> thingy wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>>> http://www.tgdaily.com/2006/07/26/samsung_announces_4gb_ssd/
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Now that is one for me....probably be silly money though....
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> :(
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Still the price will drop....
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Get two, one for boot one for /var....
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> :D
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> regards
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Thing
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Why would it be silly money? 1Gb flash drives are under $100 already?
    >>>>>
    >>>> Performance and number of writes....my undertsnading is the stuff that
    >>>> goes into cameras has a quite limited amount of writes, which is good
    >>>> enough for cameras but not good enough for an OS partition, especially
    >>>> logging....so existing cards might be OK for static partitons like /usr....
    >>>
    >>> FWIW Windows Vista ReadyBoost & ReadyDrive
    >>> http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/system/sysperf/accelerator.mspx has an
    >>> algorithm that chunks data up as its written to the flash media to
    >>> ensure that the device doesn't wear out
    >>>
    >>> We are smart about how and when we do our writes to the device. Our
    >>> research shows that we will get at least 10+ years out of flash devices
    >>> that we support.
    >>>
    >>> Regards
    >>> Nathan
    >>>

    >> Ah ok.....thought maybe this was substantially better stuff, rather than
    >> a work around, however effective.....
    >>
    >> and what about fragmentation? and its in he background cleanups, turned

    >
    > Not a problem the unique write gathering algorithm optimizes
    > performance and wear patterns and doesn't suffer from frag
    >
    >> off for these drives?

    >
    > correct
    >
    >> 10 years+ is a decent safety margin.....given the rate of change after

    >
    > Some of the projected device wear test we have done put it out to 1823
    > years (!) depending on device size, variant, and usage patterns
    >
    >> or 3 I'd expect the wearing out to be no longer an issue.....

    >
    > Yes I think you're likely to have lost your device or the storage space
    > will be irrelevant by then
    >
    >> Quite why you could not do this in hardware on the disk itself I dont
    >> know....

    >
    > We do actually do both.
    >
    > ReadyDrive is the Hybrid Hard Drive where Nonvolatile cache (NV Cache)
    > is added to the hard disk drive which allows data to be read and
    > written while platter is spun down
    > Also improves battery life and startup speed as data in cache persisted
    > when powered down. Other benefits are Performance (Faster boot, faster
    > hibernate/resume) Reliability (vibration and impact doesn't affect NV)
    > and reduced noise
    >
    > and then ReadyBoost if for Expanded Memory Devices with works with
    > External USB keys, SD cards, Compact Flash, internal PCIe cards
    >
    > Its all about avoiding the disk bottleneck, the slowest thing in a PC,
    > the thing that really hasn't changed much in the last 10 years -
    > ReadyDrive/ReadyBoost allows fast reads to satisfy page faults when
    > page is not in main memory. These are up to 10x faster than random HDD
    > reads because the latency for USB Flash Drive ~0.8 mSec
    >
    > This is a cool technology that improves performance and reduces power
    > usage for Windows Vista Mobile PCs
    >
    > And "they" claim MSFT doesn't innovate...
    >
    > Cheers
    > Nathan
    >


    yeah right....spot Apple's dashboard in vista....

    I think its not so much does not innovate more like the claim that MS
    innovates hugely is dubious....PR spin at its finest.

    regards

    Thing
    thingy, Jul 28, 2006
    #15
  16. thingy

    -=rjh=- Guest

    MaHogany wrote:

    > You're right - there has been nothing new with disc writing technology for
    > about 10 years - until recently when one of the manufacturers invented
    > vertical storage.


    Does that supersede perpendicular recording, by any chance, or are you
    confused?

    If it was perpendicular recording that you meant, note that it wasn't
    "invented" by a drive manufacturer at all and was developed in the
    1970s. For use on floppy discs.

    In the past ten years, drives have increased in capacity ~1000 fold,
    while decreasing in price, increasing speed and becoming quieter.
    Clearly nothing happening there.

    It is a shame, that materials science is such an important part of our
    lives yet gets no credit for its part, or the continual improvements and
    new products it makes possible.
    -=rjh=-, Jul 28, 2006
    #16
  17. In message <>, Nathan
    Mercer wrote:

    > MaHogany wrote:
    >
    >> On Thu, 27 Jul 2006 02:45:34 -0700, Nathan Mercer wrote:
    >>
    >> > This is a cool technology that improves performance and reduces power
    >> > usage for Windows Vista Mobile PCs
    >> >
    >> > And "they" claim MSFT doesn't innovate...

    >>
    >> LOL!
    >>
    >> I'll bite.
    >>
    >> Nothing new there - merely a disc cache.

    >
    > Who else has a similar feature?
    > Can you point us at some one else who does the things I described in
    > the prior post?


    * Not suffering from fragmentation -- just about any Linux filesystem.
    * Filesystems for flash RAM -- how about JFFS and JFFS2, power-down-safe,
    integrated journalling support, been around for years, both part of the
    standard kernel.

    Did I miss anything?
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Jul 28, 2006
    #17
  18. Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    > >> > This is a cool technology that improves performance and reduces power
    > >> > usage for Windows Vista Mobile PCs
    > >> >
    > >> > And "they" claim MSFT doesn't innovate...
    > >>
    > >> LOL!
    > >>
    > >> I'll bite.
    > >>
    > >> Nothing new there - merely a disc cache.

    > >
    > > Who else has a similar feature?
    > > Can you point us at some one else who does the things I described in
    > > the prior post?

    >
    > * Not suffering from fragmentation -- just about any Linux filesystem.
    > * Filesystems for flash RAM -- how about JFFS and JFFS2, power-down-safe,
    > integrated journalling support, been around for years, both part of the
    > standard kernel.
    >
    > Did I miss anything?


    Well, yes actually lots

    ReadyBoost solves the scenario where you want to speed your PC up, so
    you plug a USB keyfob in, click OK and your PC is dramatically faster

    I am forcing my SO at home to run Windows Vista on a Centino 900Mhz
    laptop with 512MB of RAM. With ReadyBoost enabled this machine is
    signicantly faster than Windows XP ever was or ever will be

    There are many reasons why people want to speed their PC up and can't -
    maybe they don't/can't/won't open their PC to install more RAM, even if
    they did they wouldn't know what DIMMS/SIMMS,RIMMs blah blah to buy,
    maybe they just need to speed the PC up for those end of month number
    crunching reports.

    The fact that you diss this technology shows to me that you don't
    understand it. The Microsoft Engineers involved that solved this
    problem overcame some difficult computer science engineering and memory
    management challenges, yet to the end user its plug in your USB, click
    OK and bam your PC is more performant

    And your Linux FS JFFS and JFFS2 solves this how?

    Bye

    Nathan
    Nathan Mercer, Jul 28, 2006
    #18
  19. In message <>, Nathan
    Mercer wrote:

    > Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >> >> > This is a cool technology that improves performance and reduces
    >> >> > power usage for Windows Vista Mobile PCs
    >> >> >
    >> >> > And "they" claim MSFT doesn't innovate...
    >> >>
    >> >> LOL!
    >> >>
    >> >> I'll bite.
    >> >>
    >> >> Nothing new there - merely a disc cache.
    >> >
    >> > Who else has a similar feature?
    >> > Can you point us at some one else who does the things I described in
    >> > the prior post?

    >>
    >> * Not suffering from fragmentation -- just about any Linux filesystem.
    >> * Filesystems for flash RAM -- how about JFFS and JFFS2, power-down-safe,
    >> integrated journalling support, been around for years, both part of the
    >> standard kernel.
    >>
    >> Did I miss anything?

    >
    > Well, yes actually lots
    >
    > I am forcing my SO at home to run Windows Vista on a Centino 900Mhz
    > laptop with 512MB of RAM. With ReadyBoost enabled this machine is
    > signicantly faster than Windows XP ever was or ever will be


    Which is not saying much, compared to the performance of some popular Linux
    systems on that same hardware.

    > ReadyBoost solves the scenario where you want to speed your PC up, so
    > you plug a USB keyfob in, click OK and your PC is dramatically faster
    >
    > And your Linux FS JFFS and JFFS2 solves this how?


    By avoiding the problem in the first place.
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Jul 28, 2006
    #19
  20. Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    > >> >> > This is a cool technology that improves performance and reduces
    > >> >> > power usage for Windows Vista Mobile PCs
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> > And "they" claim MSFT doesn't innovate...
    > >> >>
    > >> >> LOL!
    > >> >>
    > >> >> I'll bite.
    > >> >>
    > >> >> Nothing new there - merely a disc cache.
    > >> >
    > >> > Who else has a similar feature?
    > >> > Can you point us at some one else who does the things I described in
    > >> > the prior post?
    > >>
    > >> * Not suffering from fragmentation -- just about any Linux filesystem.
    > >> * Filesystems for flash RAM -- how about JFFS and JFFS2, power-down-safe,
    > >> integrated journalling support, been around for years, both part of the
    > >> standard kernel.
    > >>
    > >> Did I miss anything?

    > >
    > > Well, yes actually lots
    > >
    > > I am forcing my SO at home to run Windows Vista on a Centino 900Mhz
    > > laptop with 512MB of RAM. With ReadyBoost enabled this machine is
    > > signicantly faster than Windows XP ever was or ever will be

    >
    > Which is not saying much, compared to the performance of some popular Linux
    > systems on that same hardware.


    OK, but I don't want to run some old hobbled distro. I want to run the
    latest and greatest. That's why I'm running Windows Vista with all the
    bells and whistles and even the kitchen sink

    > > ReadyBoost solves the scenario where you want to speed your PC up, so
    > > you plug a USB keyfob in, click OK and your PC is dramatically faster
    > >
    > > And your Linux FS JFFS and JFFS2 solves this how?

    >
    > By avoiding the problem in the first place.


    If the many-eyes community had come up with the invention of this
    algorithm that allows you to use a USB key as virtual memory in order
    to enhance performance, I would be giving them credit where credits
    due.

    Bye
    Nathan
    Nathan Mercer, Jul 28, 2006
    #20
    1. Advertising

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