3D Images using a flat bed scanner

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by My View, Jan 1, 2007.

  1. My View

    My View Guest

    I have seen a couple of sites recently where images of 3D objects (eg
    flowers) have been created using a flat bed scanner.
    The images appear exactly as if taken with a camera (with macro lens) ie no
    flat sections because it is sitting on a scanner.

    Images are crystal clear with white backgrounds etc.

    Can anyone explain how these images of 3D objects are created using a
    scanner?

    Any attempts to replicate this have turned out very ordinary.

    regards

    PeterH
     
    My View, Jan 1, 2007
    #1
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  2. My View

    Mike Russell Guest

    "My View" <no spam > wrote in message
    news:g_6mh.16628$...
    >I have seen a couple of sites recently where images of 3D objects (eg
    >flowers) have been created using a flat bed scanner.
    > The images appear exactly as if taken with a camera (with macro lens) ie
    > no flat sections because it is sitting on a scanner.
    >
    > Images are crystal clear with white backgrounds etc.
    >
    > Can anyone explain how these images of 3D objects are created using a
    > scanner?
    >
    > Any attempts to replicate this have turned out very ordinary.


    Most scanners will do this fairly easily. If a scanner uses a mirror and
    lens arrangement to focus the image on the detector, there is generally
    enough depth of field to do a satisfactory image of small objects.

    Other scanners use a linear array of detectors, called a contact image
    sensor, that is as close as possible to the material being scanned - these
    have almost no depth of field, and produce a poor image of objects placed on
    the scanner bed.

    http://www.scantips.com/chap3c.html (look for "CCD or CIS sensors").
    --

    Mike Russell
    www.curvemeister.com/forum/
     
    Mike Russell, Jan 1, 2007
    #2
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  3. My View

    My View Guest

    Thanks Mike.
    I have a Canon scanner with CIS - that would explain the poor quality scan
    of 3D objects.
    PeterH


    "Mike Russell" <-MOVE> wrote in message
    news:EZfmh.24909$...
    > "My View" <no spam > wrote in message
    > news:g_6mh.16628$...
    >>I have seen a couple of sites recently where images of 3D objects (eg
    >>flowers) have been created using a flat bed scanner.
    >> The images appear exactly as if taken with a camera (with macro lens) ie
    >> no flat sections because it is sitting on a scanner.
    >>
    >> Images are crystal clear with white backgrounds etc.
    >>
    >> Can anyone explain how these images of 3D objects are created using a
    >> scanner?
    >>
    >> Any attempts to replicate this have turned out very ordinary.

    >
    > Most scanners will do this fairly easily. If a scanner uses a mirror and
    > lens arrangement to focus the image on the detector, there is generally
    > enough depth of field to do a satisfactory image of small objects.
    >
    > Other scanners use a linear array of detectors, called a contact image
    > sensor, that is as close as possible to the material being scanned - these
    > have almost no depth of field, and produce a poor image of objects placed
    > on the scanner bed.
    >
    > http://www.scantips.com/chap3c.html (look for "CCD or CIS sensors").
    > --
    >
    > Mike Russell
    > www.curvemeister.com/forum/
    >
    >
     
    My View, Jan 1, 2007
    #3
  4. My View

    Conrad Guest

    Hi Peter,


    >> I have seen a couple of sites recently where images of 3D objects (eg

    flowers) have been created using a flat bed scanner.
    The images appear exactly as if taken with a camera (with macro lens)
    ie no
    flat sections because it is sitting on a scanner.

    > Images are crystal clear with white backgrounds etc.


    > Can anyone explain how these images of 3D objects are created using a
    > scanner?


    >Any attempts to replicate this have turned out very ordinary.<<




    Quite awhile back, I did fossils on a flat bed scanner that came out
    pretty good.

    If I were trying to get 3D images from flowers - I might try with a
    soft white cloth to cover the flower(s) during scan and not put scanner
    cover down.

    I might try this myself - if time opens up (unlikely).

    Good luck with your efforts.


    Best,

    Conrad
    Camp Sherman, Oregon
     
    Conrad, Jan 2, 2007
    #4
  5. My View

    Paul Rubin Guest

    "My View" <no spam > writes:
    > Can anyone explain how these images of 3D objects are created using a
    > scanner?
    >
    > Any attempts to replicate this have turned out very ordinary.


    You have to use the big clunky type of scanner with the long optical
    path, to get any depth of field.
     
    Paul Rubin, Jan 2, 2007
    #5
  6. My View

    My View Guest

    This is the website I was talking about
    http://www.pbase.com/accordsystems/floral_scanography


    "Conrad" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi Peter,
    >
    >
    >>> I have seen a couple of sites recently where images of 3D objects (eg

    > flowers) have been created using a flat bed scanner.
    > The images appear exactly as if taken with a camera (with macro lens)
    > ie no
    > flat sections because it is sitting on a scanner.
    >
    >> Images are crystal clear with white backgrounds etc.

    >
    >> Can anyone explain how these images of 3D objects are created using a
    >> scanner?

    >
    > >Any attempts to replicate this have turned out very ordinary.<<

    >
    >
    >
    > Quite awhile back, I did fossils on a flat bed scanner that came out
    > pretty good.
    >
    > If I were trying to get 3D images from flowers - I might try with a
    > soft white cloth to cover the flower(s) during scan and not put scanner
    > cover down.
    >
    > I might try this myself - if time opens up (unlikely).
    >
    > Good luck with your efforts.
    >
    >
    > Best,
    >
    > Conrad
    > Camp Sherman, Oregon
    >
     
    My View, Jan 2, 2007
    #6
  7. My View

    Justin C Guest

    In article <JbBmh.349$>,
    "My View" <no spam > wrote:

    > This is the website I was talking about
    > http://www.pbase.com/accordsystems/floral_scanography


    I've seen some like these before, and impressed I was then, too. I'd be
    interested to know for what she used the transparency adapter.
    Unfortunately there is no way of contacting the photographer except by
    leaving a guest-book entry, and she doesn't appear to have replied to
    any of the entries she already has.

    --
    Justin C, by the sea.
     
    Justin C, Jan 2, 2007
    #7
  8. My View

    Tom Nelson Guest

    There was an article a year or so ago about a scan-photographer in one
    of the magazines I get. It might have been Studio Photography. I recall
    that he used monofilament fishing line to hold hold flowers and avoid
    the squished-on-the-glass look. Sorry, that's all I remember about it.
    Tom Nelson
    Tom Nelson Photography
     
    Tom Nelson, Jan 3, 2007
    #8
  9. My View

    Cgiorgio Guest

    Cgiorgio, Jan 3, 2007
    #9
  10. My View

    My View Guest

    I came across this article yesterday http://tinyurl.com/y68uhm


    "Tom Nelson" <> wrote in message
    news:030120071244068929%...
    > There was an article a year or so ago about a scan-photographer in one
    > of the magazines I get. It might have been Studio Photography. I recall
    > that he used monofilament fishing line to hold hold flowers and avoid
    > the squished-on-the-glass look. Sorry, that's all I remember about it.
    > Tom Nelson
    > Tom Nelson Photography
     
    My View, Jan 3, 2007
    #10
  11. On Wed, 3 Jan 2007 20:50:46 +0100, "Cgiorgio" <> found these
    unused words floating about:

    >I know that some Linotype (professional grade) flatbed scanners were pretty
    >good at scanning 3D - objects, googling for it I found a couple of links.
    >One of them is:
    >
    >http://www.flatbed-scanner-review.org/Linotype-Hell_flatbed_scanner/Japan_candy_Heidelberg_CPS.html
    >
    >I wrote "were" because the company discontinued the product line, but I am
    >sure that many are still in use.
    >

    Nearly any scanner that does -=NOT=- use a lens system (such as the older
    Microtek legal size) will do a credible job on 3D items.
     
    Sir F. A. Rien, Jan 3, 2007
    #11
  12. Hi There!

    You cannot describe these images as 3D images! It will be silly to
    remind you of digital cameras, and what they do in a glance, especially
    when you have a tripod. I still remember days when we had to use
    scanner to take a real snap shot. I wasn't happy with the results, to
    the extent I discarded this silly procedure. If you insist to use
    scanner to take some real shots, you need to scan the front view, side
    view then top view. I was doing this for the packs which are
    rectangular boxes. Using Photoshop you can reassemble these sides
    together by applying proper perspectives for each view. The most
    important thing that you feather (as required by your case) the edges
    to be joined together. It will need some training to master the
    procedure.

    Mohamed Al-Dabbagh
    Senior Graphic Designer




    My View wrote:
    > I have seen a couple of sites recently where images of 3D objects (eg
    > flowers) have been created using a flat bed scanner.
    > The images appear exactly as if taken with a camera (with macro lens) ie no
    > flat sections because it is sitting on a scanner.
    >
    > Images are crystal clear with white backgrounds etc.
    >
    > Can anyone explain how these images of 3D objects are created using a
    > scanner?
    >
    > Any attempts to replicate this have turned out very ordinary.
    >
    > regards
    >
    > PeterH
     
    Mohamed Al-Dabbagh, Jan 10, 2007
    #12
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