3CX - any good?

Discussion in 'UK VOIP' started by Henry Hooray, Aug 13, 2007.

  1. Henry Hooray

    Henry Hooray Guest

    An IT friend of mine gave me the cover disk from a magazine he received, and
    on it is 3CX Phone System 3, which claims to be "Complete phone PBX in
    software!".

    Does anybody - preferably with experience of this piece of software - know
    if this is any good?

    TIA
     
    Henry Hooray, Aug 13, 2007
    #1
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  2. Henry Hooray

    Lurch Guest

    On Mon, 13 Aug 2007 15:35:31 +0100, "Henry Hooray"
    <> mused:

    >An IT friend of mine gave me the cover disk from a magazine he received, and
    >on it is 3CX Phone System 3, which claims to be "Complete phone PBX in
    >software!".
    >
    >Does anybody - preferably with experience of this piece of software - know
    >if this is any good?
    >

    Can't comment on the actual software but the idea behind it is that
    rather than using VoIP phones connected to an outside provider, such
    as Sipgate, you connect to an internal server that you run yourself.
    Unless you are planning on running a reasonable sized IP based PBX
    then it won't do anything more than a decent specced IP office
    (Grandstream 2000, or 2020 spring to mind) phone and a couple of free
    VoIP accounts, apart from require more hardware.

    All AFAIAA IMO anyway.
    --
    Regards,
    Stuart.
     
    Lurch, Aug 13, 2007
    #2
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  3. Henry Hooray

    Rob Guest

    "Lurch" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Mon, 13 Aug 2007 15:35:31 +0100, "Henry Hooray"
    > <> mused:
    >
    > >An IT friend of mine gave me the cover disk from a magazine he received,

    and
    > >on it is 3CX Phone System 3, which claims to be "Complete phone PBX in
    > >software!".
    > >
    > >Does anybody - preferably with experience of this piece of software -

    know
    > >if this is any good?
    > >

    > Can't comment on the actual software but the idea behind it is that
    > rather than using VoIP phones connected to an outside provider, such
    > as Sipgate, you connect to an internal server that you run yourself.
    > Unless you are planning on running a reasonable sized IP based PBX
    > then it won't do anything more than a decent specced IP office
    > (Grandstream 2000, or 2020 spring to mind) phone and a couple of free
    > VoIP accounts, apart from require more hardware.
    >
    > All AFAIAA IMO anyway.


    Does anybody know if this 3CX software could be used to provide a similar
    service (on a personal and a few friends basis) to that provided by Voxalot?

    I imagine it would need to be able to provide SIP registrar / redirect / and
    proxy server facilities to do as required above.

    Rob
     
    Rob, Aug 14, 2007
    #3
  4. Henry Hooray

    Graham. Guest

    "Rob" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "Lurch" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> On Mon, 13 Aug 2007 15:35:31 +0100, "Henry Hooray"
    >> <> mused:
    >>
    >> >An IT friend of mine gave me the cover disk from a magazine he received,

    > and
    >> >on it is 3CX Phone System 3, which claims to be "Complete phone PBX in
    >> >software!".
    >> >
    >> >Does anybody - preferably with experience of this piece of software -

    > know
    >> >if this is any good?
    >> >

    >> Can't comment on the actual software but the idea behind it is that
    >> rather than using VoIP phones connected to an outside provider, such
    >> as Sipgate, you connect to an internal server that you run yourself.
    >> Unless you are planning on running a reasonable sized IP based PBX
    >> then it won't do anything more than a decent specced IP office
    >> (Grandstream 2000, or 2020 spring to mind) phone and a couple of free
    >> VoIP accounts, apart from require more hardware.
    >>
    >> All AFAIAA IMO anyway.

    >
    > Does anybody know if this 3CX software could be used to provide a similar
    > service (on a personal and a few friends basis) to that provided by
    > Voxalot?
    >
    > I imagine it would need to be able to provide SIP registrar / redirect /
    > and
    > proxy server facilities to do as required above.
    >
    > Rob


    Wouldn't Asterisk do all that?
    --
    Graham.
    %Profound_observation%
     
    Graham., Aug 14, 2007
    #4
  5. Henry Hooray

    Rob Guest

    "Graham." <> wrote in message
    news:f9smfl$fik$...

    > >
    > > Does anybody know if this 3CX software could be used to provide a

    similar
    > > service (on a personal and a few friends basis) to that provided by
    > > Voxalot?
    > >
    > > I imagine it would need to be able to provide SIP registrar / redirect /
    > > and
    > > proxy server facilities to do as required above.
    > >
    > > Rob

    >
    > Wouldn't Asterisk do all that?


    I don't know. :)

    Doesn't Asterisk need to be installed on a Linux box?

    I was hoping to be able to set something reasonably simple up to enable a
    handful of friends/family in Australia and Sweden (I am in the UK) to be
    able to use multiple VoIP accounts which at present they cannot do as their
    equipment is only capable of handling a single SIP registrar. As I see it,
    if they were able to register their devices on my "service", then providing
    some sort of dial-plan were available to them via that "service", it should
    be possible to achieve the intended outcome.

    Personally I use a DrayTek 2800VG which can handle 6 SIP registrars, but a
    few more would be welcome.

    Rob
     
    Rob, Aug 14, 2007
    #5
  6. In article <>,
    Rob <> wrote:
    >
    >"Graham." <> wrote in message
    >news:f9smfl$fik$...
    >
    >> >
    >> > Does anybody know if this 3CX software could be used to provide a

    >similar
    >> > service (on a personal and a few friends basis) to that provided by
    >> > Voxalot?
    >> >
    >> > I imagine it would need to be able to provide SIP registrar / redirect /
    >> > and
    >> > proxy server facilities to do as required above.
    >> >
    >> > Rob

    >>
    >> Wouldn't Asterisk do all that?

    >
    >I don't know. :)
    >
    >Doesn't Asterisk need to be installed on a Linux box?


    3CX is a closed-source PBX system which runs under Windows. There is
    a free version with user/community support (via forums) and a paid-for
    version with (I guess) support from the company.

    Asterisk is open-source which runs under Linux (and Solaris) Lots of
    support from digium (the primary sponsors) and the communiuty via
    forums/mailling lists, etc. as well as various people who'll sell
    you support.

    >I was hoping to be able to set something reasonably simple up to enable a
    >handful of friends/family in Australia and Sweden (I am in the UK) to be
    >able to use multiple VoIP accounts which at present they cannot do as their
    >equipment is only capable of handling a single SIP registrar. As I see it,
    >if they were able to register their devices on my "service", then providing
    >some sort of dial-plan were available to them via that "service", it should
    >be possible to achieve the intended outcome.


    Either 3CX or Asterisk ought to be able to do what you require - if you
    run them on a suitable PC at home. You then create your own closed VoIP
    system, and with Asterisk, you could certianly take their local SIP
    providers details and register the * box with them, to allow them to
    call-through to their own provider as well as calling the other local
    users, although you'd need to be careful to not let other users use other
    users SIP providers (and thus run up charges to the wrong person!) And
    everyone would need to trust you with their SIP username & passwords
    for their own providers - trust you to not abuse them and run up their
    bills, etc.

    Gordon
     
    Gordon Henderson, Aug 14, 2007
    #6
  7. Henry Hooray

    Rob Guest

    "Gordon Henderson" <> wrote in message
    news:46c1efad$0$13936$...
    >
    > 3CX is a closed-source PBX system which runs under Windows. There is
    > a free version with user/community support (via forums) and a paid-for
    > version with (I guess) support from the company.


    Yes, I found the free version thanks :)
    I think I might have play around with it when I get some spare time.
    If anybody wants to download it, it's available here:
    http://www.3cx.com/ip-pbx/index.html

    > Asterisk is open-source which runs under Linux (and Solaris) Lots of
    > support from digium (the primary sponsors) and the communiuty via
    > forums/mailling lists, etc. as well as various people who'll sell
    > you support.


    That's out for me ATM then, as I'm not familiar with either of those OSs.

    > >I was hoping to be able to set something reasonably simple up to enable a
    > >handful of friends/family in Australia and Sweden (I am in the UK) to be
    > >able to use multiple VoIP accounts which at present they cannot do as

    their
    > >equipment is only capable of handling a single SIP registrar. As I see

    it,
    > >if they were able to register their devices on my "service", then

    providing
    > >some sort of dial-plan were available to them via that "service", it

    should
    > >be possible to achieve the intended outcome.

    >
    > Either 3CX or Asterisk ought to be able to do what you require - if you
    > run them on a suitable PC at home. You then create your own closed VoIP
    > system, and with Asterisk, you could certianly take their local SIP
    > providers details and register the * box with them, to allow them to
    > call-through to their own provider as well as calling the other local
    > users, although you'd need to be careful to not let other users use other
    > users SIP providers (and thus run up charges to the wrong person!) And
    > everyone would need to trust you with their SIP username & passwords
    > for their own providers - trust you to not abuse them and run up their
    > bills, etc.


    Thanks for the comments, it sounds like it might be possible from what you
    say. Presumably if it is possible to redirect calls, the actual VoIP
    traffic itself will not be travelling via my PC and will therefore not
    suffer from excess delay by travelling from say, Australia to UK and back to
    Australia again for an internal Australian call.

    Rob
     
    Rob, Aug 14, 2007
    #7
  8. In article <>,
    Rob <> wrote:
    >
    >"Gordon Henderson" <> wrote in message
    >news:46c1efad$0$13936$...
    >>
    >> 3CX is a closed-source PBX system which runs under Windows. There is
    >> a free version with user/community support (via forums) and a paid-for
    >> version with (I guess) support from the company.

    >
    >Yes, I found the free version thanks :)
    >I think I might have play around with it when I get some spare time.
    >If anybody wants to download it, it's available here:
    >http://www.3cx.com/ip-pbx/index.html
    >
    >> Asterisk is open-source which runs under Linux (and Solaris) Lots of
    >> support from digium (the primary sponsors) and the communiuty via
    >> forums/mailling lists, etc. as well as various people who'll sell
    >> you support.

    >
    >That's out for me ATM then, as I'm not familiar with either of those OSs.


    There are various "live install" CDs for asterisk - take a blank PC, put in
    the CD and turn it on ...

    >> >I was hoping to be able to set something reasonably simple up to enable a
    >> >handful of friends/family in Australia and Sweden (I am in the UK) to be
    >> >able to use multiple VoIP accounts which at present they cannot do as

    >their
    >> >equipment is only capable of handling a single SIP registrar. As I see

    >it,
    >> >if they were able to register their devices on my "service", then

    >providing
    >> >some sort of dial-plan were available to them via that "service", it

    >should
    >> >be possible to achieve the intended outcome.

    >>
    >> Either 3CX or Asterisk ought to be able to do what you require - if you
    >> run them on a suitable PC at home. You then create your own closed VoIP
    >> system, and with Asterisk, you could certianly take their local SIP
    >> providers details and register the * box with them, to allow them to
    >> call-through to their own provider as well as calling the other local
    >> users, although you'd need to be careful to not let other users use other
    >> users SIP providers (and thus run up charges to the wrong person!) And
    >> everyone would need to trust you with their SIP username & passwords
    >> for their own providers - trust you to not abuse them and run up their
    >> bills, etc.

    >
    >Thanks for the comments, it sounds like it might be possible from what you
    >say. Presumably if it is possible to redirect calls, the actual VoIP
    >traffic itself will not be travelling via my PC and will therefore not
    >suffer from excess delay by travelling from say, Australia to UK and back to
    >Australia again for an internal Australian call.


    Well that's where it gets tricky. Handling SIP/RTP traffic through NAT
    firewalls can be somewhat problematic and you might well end up with data
    going from Oz through your home ADSL line then back to the Oz telco...

    Gordon
     
    Gordon Henderson, Aug 14, 2007
    #8
  9. Henry Hooray

    Graham. Guest

    "Rob" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "Graham." <> wrote in message
    > news:f9smfl$fik$...
    >
    >> >
    >> > Does anybody know if this 3CX software could be used to provide a

    > similar
    >> > service (on a personal and a few friends basis) to that provided by
    >> > Voxalot?
    >> >
    >> > I imagine it would need to be able to provide SIP registrar / redirect
    >> > /
    >> > and
    >> > proxy server facilities to do as required above.
    >> >
    >> > Rob

    >>
    >> Wouldn't Asterisk do all that?

    >
    > I don't know. :)
    >
    > Doesn't Asterisk need to be installed on a Linux box?


    Yes, but don't let that fact alone put you off.
    I know nothing about Linux, but I put together
    a working Asterisk at Home box in a couple of evenings
    using an old Pentium II

    If you have an old PC lying about why not download
    the latest version of Trixbox from here
    http://sourceforge.net/projects/asteriskathome/
    If you can burn an iso, you can build a Trixbox.

    Think of it this way, you don't know the first thing
    about the OS that runs your router, but that doesn't
    stop you from logging into it's web interface from
    a windows box to configure it.
    It's exactly the same with Trixbox.

    --
    Graham.
    %Profound_observation%
     
    Graham., Aug 14, 2007
    #9
  10. Henry Hooray

    Guest

    On 8 13 , 10 35 , "Henry Hooray"
    <> wrote:
    > An IT friend of mine gave me the cover disk from a magazine he received, and
    > on it is 3CX Phone System 3, which claims to be "Complete phone PBX in
    > software!".
    >
    > Does anybody - preferably with experience of this piece of software - know
    > if this is any good?



    Well, it is a software-based IP PBX that replaces a traditional
    proprietary hardware PBX / PABX. 3CX's IP PBX has been developed
    specifically for Microsoft Windows and is based on the SIP standard -
    making it easier to manage and allowing you to use any SIP phone
    (software or hardware).
    A software-based IP PBX / PABX offers numerous benefits:
    No need for separate phone wiring - phones use computer network
    Easier to install & manage via web-based configuration interface
    A software-based IP PBX is far less expensive then a hardware-based
    PBX / PABX
    Employees can move offices without requiring any changes in the wiring
    or IP PBX configuration
    Choose from the many SIP based hardware phones instead of getting
    locked in with one vendor
    Receive & Make calls via the standard PSTN using VOIP Gateways
    Save on call costs using any SIP VOIP service or WAN
     
    , Aug 15, 2007
    #10
  11. Henry Hooray

    Guest

    On 8 13 , 10 35 , "Henry Hooray"
    <> wrote:
    > An IT friend of mine gave me the cover disk from a magazine he received, and
    > on it is 3CX Phone System 3, which claims to be "Complete phone PBX in
    > software!".
    >
    > Does anybody - preferably with experience of this piece of software - know
    > if this is any good?
    >
    > TIA


    3CX Phone System for Windows is a software-based IP PBX that replaces
    a traditional proprietary hardware PBX / PABX. 3CX's IP PBX has been
    developed specifically for Microsoft Windows and is based on the SIP
    standard - making it easier to manage and allowing you to use any SIP
    phone (software or hardware). A software-based IP PBX / PABX offers
    numerous benefits:

    No need for separate phone wiring - phones use computer network
    Easier to install & manage via web-based configuration interface
    A software-based IP PBX is far less expensive then a hardware-based
    PBX / PABX
    Employees can move offices without requiring any changes in the wiring
    or IP PBX configuration
    Choose from the many SIP based hardware phones instead of getting
    locked in with one vendor
    Receive & Make calls via the standard PSTN using VOIP Gateways
    Save on call costs using any SIP VOIP service or WAN
     
    , Aug 15, 2007
    #11
  12. Henry Hooray

    Hongtian Guest

    On 15 Aug, 01:49, "Rob" <> wrote:
    > "Graham." <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:f9smfl$fik$...
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > > Does anybody know if this 3CX software could be used to provide a

    > similar
    > > > service (on a personal and a few friends basis) to that provided by
    > > > Voxalot?

    >
    > > > I imagine it would need to be able to provide SIP registrar / redirect /
    > > > and
    > > > proxy server facilities to do as required above.

    >
    > > > Rob

    >
    > > Wouldn't Asterisk do all that?

    >
    > I don't know. :)
    >
    > Doesn't Asterisk need to be installed on a Linux box?
    >
    > I was hoping to be able to set something reasonably simple up to enable a
    > handful of friends/family in Australia and Sweden (I am in the UK) to be
    > able to use multiple VoIP accounts which at present they cannot do as their
    > equipment is only capable of handling a single SIP registrar. As I see it,
    > if they were able to register their devices on my "service", then providing
    > some sort of dial-plan were available to them via that "service", it should
    > be possible to achieve the intended outcome.
    >
    > Personally I use a DrayTek 2800VG which can handle 6 SIP registrars, but a
    > few more would be welcome.
    >
    > Rob


    I suggest you to try miniSipServer which is also a SIP server for
    windows OS.

    MSS is very easy; and I think you can setup your environment with MSS
    almost in 1 minute!

    dowload URL is:
    http://www.myvoipapp.com
     
    Hongtian, Aug 15, 2007
    #12
  13. Henry Hooray

    Rob Guest

    "Hongtian" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > I suggest you to try miniSipServer which is also a SIP server for
    > windows OS.
    >
    > MSS is very easy; and I think you can setup your environment with MSS
    > almost in 1 minute!
    >
    > dowload URL is:
    > http://www.myvoipapp.com


    Thanks, I'll take a look at that also.

    Rob
     
    Rob, Aug 15, 2007
    #13
  14. Henry Hooray

    Tim Guest

    Rob wrote:
    > Personally I use a DrayTek 2800VG which can handle 6 SIP registrars, but a
    > few more would be welcome.
    >


    Snom320 and upwards can do 12.

    Tim
     
    Tim, Aug 15, 2007
    #14
  15. Henry Hooray

    Tim Guest

    Gordon Henderson wrote:
    > Either 3CX or Asterisk ought to be able to do what you require - if you
    > run them on a suitable PC at home. You then create your own closed VoIP
    > system, and with Asterisk, you could certianly take their local SIP
    > providers details and register the * box with them, to allow them to
    > call-through to their own provider as well as calling the other local
    > users, although you'd need to be careful to not let other users use other
    > users SIP providers (and thus run up charges to the wrong person!) And
    > everyone would need to trust you with their SIP username & passwords
    > for their own providers - trust you to not abuse them and run up their
    > bills, etc.


    And it would also only be as reliable as your home internet connection,
    for remote users.



    Tim
     
    Tim, Aug 15, 2007
    #15
  16. Henry Hooray

    Tim Guest

    Rob wrote:
    > Thanks for the comments, it sounds like it might be possible from what you
    > say. Presumably if it is possible to redirect calls, the actual VoIP
    > traffic itself will not be travelling via my PC and will therefore not
    > suffer from excess delay by travelling from say, Australia to UK and back to
    > Australia again for an internal Australian call.
    >


    That depends very much on how the software works. Whether it is more
    SIP based (like SER) or more pbx based (like asterisk).


    As Gordon pointed out, you'll probably end up carrying the RTP (audio)
    for natted users. So you will need some Qos on your line, or your
    friends will be complaining everytime you do a big upload.

    Tim
     
    Tim, Aug 15, 2007
    #16
  17. Henry Hooray

    Henry Hooray Guest

    Just to say thanks for all the answers, and the interesting discussion.

    Henry.

    "Henry Hooray" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > An IT friend of mine gave me the cover disk from a magazine he received,
    > and on it is 3CX Phone System 3, which claims to be "Complete phone PBX in
    > software!".
    >
    > Does anybody - preferably with experience of this piece of software - know
    > if this is any good?
    >
    > TIA
     
    Henry Hooray, Aug 16, 2007
    #17
  18. Henry Hooray

    alexd Guest

    Rob wrote:

    >
    > "Graham." <> wrote in message
    > news:f9smfl$fik$...


    >> > I imagine it would need to be able to provide SIP registrar / redirect
    >> > / and proxy server facilities to do as required above.


    >> Wouldn't Asterisk do all that?

    >
    > I don't know. :)
    >
    > Doesn't Asterisk need to be installed on a Linux box?


    Yes, but a Linux box can be the size of a router, or it can fill an entire
    room. It is possible to run Asterisk on an OpenWRT router that will run
    24x7 without consuming anywhere near as much power as a PC. The downside is
    that it won't be as capable as a full blown PC running linux.

    --
    <http://ale.cx/> (AIM:troffasky) ()
    18:24:01 up 31 days, 9 min, 2 users, load average: 1.06, 1.38, 1.37
    09 f9 11 02 9d 74 e3 5b d8 41 56 c5 63 56 88 c0
     
    alexd, Aug 17, 2007
    #18
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