340 Wireless Bridge

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by Andy, Apr 17, 2004.

  1. Andy

    Andy Guest

    Is the Cisco Aironet 340 wireless bridge different from other wireless
    bridges that's out there currently, like the Linksys WET11, Dlink
    DWL810, etc, that can put an Ethernet device on a wireless network? I
    know the 340 has more functionality and can be used as an access
    point, but can it be configured to be a basic ethernet-to-wireless
    bridge?

    I have a 340 wireless bridge (342 actually) and I'm trying to put a HP
    Laserjet with Jetdirect onto my wireless network. I'm using a Belkin 4
    port wireless router as my primary access point (to the Internet). I
    connected the HPLJ to the 340 via a crossover Cat5. It get associated
    to the 340 as a local node, and the 340 is associated to the Belkin as
    a child node, but the printer doesn't obtain an IP via DHCP. The 340
    is set up in Bridge Only mode as a non-root unit. I'm just wondering
    if I can make this work or do I have to get a ethernet-to-wireless
    bridge. I also have a wired router and switch if either one of those
    will help me (like hooking up the 340 and printer both to a switch).
    All help is appreciated.
    Andy
    Andy, Apr 17, 2004
    #1
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  2. Andy

    Dan Lanciani Guest

    In article <>, (Andy) writes:

    | Is the Cisco Aironet 340 wireless bridge different from other wireless
    | bridges that's out there currently, like the Linksys WET11, Dlink
    | DWL810, etc, that can put an Ethernet device on a wireless network? I
    | know the 340 has more functionality and can be used as an access
    | point, but can it be configured to be a basic ethernet-to-wireless
    | bridge?

    The short answer is that it will work only with other Aironet gear (and
    I'm not even sure about the newer products--the BR34x is not really
    part of the 340 family but is a renamed BR500). The problem is that
    there really is no standard way to implement what you want, and different
    vendors use different tricks. I've heard that somebody is actually making
    a unit that implements multiple virtual STAs for its MAC clients (which
    would make it compatible with any standard access point), but I haven't seen
    this yet.

    Dan Lanciani
    ddl@danlan.*com
    Dan Lanciani, Apr 18, 2004
    #2
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  3. Andy

    Andy Guest

    Hmm, so a bridge is not a bridge is not a bridge?? If anything I'd
    expect the newer consumer grade bridges to be a stripped down version
    of a full featured bridge like the 340. What is a workgroup bridge
    then? Someone suggested I need one of those to hook up my printer. You
    hook a WWB up to a switch and it allows n number of people to have
    wireless capability...on the same subnet as the root unit or a
    different subnet?

    ddl@danlan.*com (Dan Lanciani) wrote in message news:<>...
    > In article <>, (Andy) writes:
    >
    > | Is the Cisco Aironet 340 wireless bridge different from other wireless
    > | bridges that's out there currently, like the Linksys WET11, Dlink
    > | DWL810, etc, that can put an Ethernet device on a wireless network? I
    > | know the 340 has more functionality and can be used as an access
    > | point, but can it be configured to be a basic ethernet-to-wireless
    > | bridge?
    >
    > The short answer is that it will work only with other Aironet gear (and
    > I'm not even sure about the newer products--the BR34x is not really
    > part of the 340 family but is a renamed BR500). The problem is that
    > there really is no standard way to implement what you want, and different
    > vendors use different tricks. I've heard that somebody is actually making
    > a unit that implements multiple virtual STAs for its MAC clients (which
    > would make it compatible with any standard access point), but I haven't seen
    > this yet.
    >
    > Dan Lanciani
    > ddl@danlan.*com
    Andy, Apr 19, 2004
    #3
  4. Andy

    Dan Lanciani Guest

    In article <>, (Andy) writes:

    | Hmm, so a bridge is not a bridge is not a bridge??

    Yes, the term "bridge" is used to refer to many different things. Even a
    basic access point is a bridge in the sense that it bridges the wired and
    wireless networks.

    | If anything I'd
    | expect the newer consumer grade bridges to be a stripped down version
    | of a full featured bridge like the 340.

    No, because the "consumer grade bridges" seek to work with a variety of
    access points and that was never a goal for Aironet's products.

    | What is a workgroup bridge
    | then?

    Depends on whose product you are talking about. Cisco's workgroup bridges
    are essentially Aironet multi-clients with the client limit increased from
    4 to 8. They use proprietary protocol extensions to register each of their
    clients' MAC addresses with their host access point. Like a "real" Aironet
    bridge they use the 4-address header format of a WDS, so they might work
    (partially) with other products. The Linksys WET11 claims to be a bridge
    but isn't really a generic bridge at all. It registers only its own MAC
    address with any access point and then plays proxy ARP and header munging
    games to make IP work for its clients.

    Dan Lanciani
    ddl@danlan.*com
    Dan Lanciani, Apr 20, 2004
    #4
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