30D - odd shutter/metering behaviour

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Chris Gilbert, May 25, 2007.

  1. Have any 30D users come across a situation where the
    camera throws the shutter for less time then indicated by
    metering ? I was shooting late yesterday and the camera
    persistently misbehaved, seriously underexposing the shot.
    Curiously, I switched off and packed to head off home and
    came across something else to shoot while walking back
    but this time the camera behaved impeccably. The only
    thing I can think of is that for at least a couple of hours
    while I was working I allowed the camera to continually
    drop into sleep mode when I was lining up the next shot. I
    can imagine some kind of software fault associated with
    sleep mode that messes up the internal memory in some
    manner. After switching off and on again, thereby rebooting,
    everything was OK. Also, it's been fine again today.

    Sound famliar to anyone ?

    Chris
    --
    Chris Gilbert Photography
    www.ravenseyegallery.co.uk
    Chris Gilbert, May 25, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. In article <pMD5i.898$>,
    "Chris Gilbert" <> wrote:

    > Have any 30D users come across a situation where the
    > camera throws the shutter for less time then indicated by
    > metering ? I was shooting late yesterday and the camera
    > persistently misbehaved, seriously underexposing the shot.
    > Curiously, I switched off and packed to head off home and
    > came across something else to shoot while walking back
    > but this time the camera behaved impeccably. The only
    > thing I can think of is that for at least a couple of hours
    > while I was working I allowed the camera to continually
    > drop into sleep mode when I was lining up the next shot. I
    > can imagine some kind of software fault associated with
    > sleep mode that messes up the internal memory in some
    > manner. After switching off and on again, thereby rebooting,
    > everything was OK. Also, it's been fine again today.
    >
    > Sound famliar to anyone ?
    >
    > Chris
    > --
    > Chris Gilbert Photography
    > www.ravenseyegallery.co.uk


    Did you have light coming in through the eyepiece? There's a cap for it
    so your exposure times aren't too short when you're not holding the
    camera to your face. It's especially important at night or with lenses
    that aren't very bright.
    Kevin McMurtrie, May 26, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Chris Gilbert

    X-Man Guest

    On Fri, 25 May 2007 20:35:09 -0700, Kevin McMurtrie <>
    wrote:

    >In article <pMD5i.898$>,
    > "Chris Gilbert" <> wrote:
    >
    >> Have any 30D users come across a situation where the
    >> camera throws the shutter for less time then indicated by
    >> metering ? I was shooting late yesterday and the camera
    >> persistently misbehaved, seriously underexposing the shot.
    >> Curiously, I switched off and packed to head off home and
    >> came across something else to shoot while walking back
    >> but this time the camera behaved impeccably. The only
    >> thing I can think of is that for at least a couple of hours
    >> while I was working I allowed the camera to continually
    >> drop into sleep mode when I was lining up the next shot. I
    >> can imagine some kind of software fault associated with
    >> sleep mode that messes up the internal memory in some
    >> manner. After switching off and on again, thereby rebooting,
    >> everything was OK. Also, it's been fine again today.
    >>
    >> Sound famliar to anyone ?
    >>
    >> Chris
    >> --
    >> Chris Gilbert Photography
    >> www.ravenseyegallery.co.uk

    >
    >Did you have light coming in through the eyepiece? There's a cap for it
    >so your exposure times aren't too short when you're not holding the
    >camera to your face. It's especially important at night or with lenses
    >that aren't very bright.


    Wait a minute...

    I need to mark this down as reason #137 of why DSLRs are worse than high-end P&S
    cameras. In non-DSLR cameras the metering is taken right from the CCD so there's
    never any possibility of stray light wrongly influencing the exposure settings.
    This was always a problem from the equivalent SLR technology from the last
    century too. Nice to see that it still exists in DSLRs today. But then, it has
    to, since DSLRs are using last century's technology. With no way to ever get
    around its insurmountable faults and limitations.

    Okay, I have it marked down .... do continue ...
    X-Man, May 26, 2007
    #3
  4. Chris Gilbert

    Ray Fischer Guest

    Chris Gilbert <> wrote:
    >Have any 30D users come across a situation where the
    >camera throws the shutter for less time then indicated by
    >metering ? I was shooting late yesterday and the camera
    >persistently misbehaved, seriously underexposing the shot.
    >Curiously, I switched off and packed to head off home and
    >came across something else to shoot while walking back
    >but this time the camera behaved impeccably. The only
    >thing I can think of is that for at least a couple of hours
    >while I was working I allowed the camera to continually
    >drop into sleep mode when I was lining up the next shot. I
    >can imagine some kind of software fault associated with
    >sleep mode that messes up the internal memory in some
    >manner. After switching off and on again, thereby rebooting,
    >everything was OK. Also, it's been fine again today.
    >
    >Sound famliar to anyone ?


    When it's happened to me it was because I inadvertently spun the dial
    on the back and set a negative exposure compensation. Check the exif
    data for the photos and see if there is any exposure compensation.
    --
    Ray Fischer
    Ray Fischer, May 26, 2007
    #4
  5. Chris Gilbert

    Ray Fischer Guest

    X-Man <> wrote:
    >On Fri, 25 May 2007 20:35:09 -0700, Kevin McMurtrie <>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>In article <pMD5i.898$>,
    >> "Chris Gilbert" <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Have any 30D users come across a situation where the
    >>> camera throws the shutter for less time then indicated by
    >>> metering ? I was shooting late yesterday and the camera
    >>> persistently misbehaved, seriously underexposing the shot.
    >>> Curiously, I switched off and packed to head off home and
    >>> came across something else to shoot while walking back
    >>> but this time the camera behaved impeccably. The only
    >>> thing I can think of is that for at least a couple of hours
    >>> while I was working I allowed the camera to continually
    >>> drop into sleep mode when I was lining up the next shot. I
    >>> can imagine some kind of software fault associated with
    >>> sleep mode that messes up the internal memory in some
    >>> manner. After switching off and on again, thereby rebooting,
    >>> everything was OK. Also, it's been fine again today.
    >>>
    >>> Sound famliar to anyone ?

    >>
    >>Did you have light coming in through the eyepiece? There's a cap for it
    >>so your exposure times aren't too short when you're not holding the
    >>camera to your face. It's especially important at night or with lenses
    >>that aren't very bright.

    >
    >Wait a minute...
    >
    >I need to mark this down as reason #137 of why DSLRs are worse than high-end P&S
    >cameras.


    #1 being that you're an idiot?

    > In non-DSLR cameras the metering is taken right from the CCD so there's
    >never any possibility of stray light wrongly influencing the exposure settings.


    Which is another reason why P&S cameras suck down batteries so fast.

    --
    Ray Fischer
    Ray Fischer, May 26, 2007
    #5
  6. Chris Gilbert

    X-Man Guest

    On 26 May 2007 04:02:51 GMT, (Ray Fischer) wrote:

    >X-Man <> wrote:
    >>On Fri, 25 May 2007 20:35:09 -0700, Kevin McMurtrie <>
    >>wrote:
    >>
    >>>In article <pMD5i.898$>,
    >>> "Chris Gilbert" <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Have any 30D users come across a situation where the
    >>>> camera throws the shutter for less time then indicated by
    >>>> metering ? I was shooting late yesterday and the camera
    >>>> persistently misbehaved, seriously underexposing the shot.
    >>>> Curiously, I switched off and packed to head off home and
    >>>> came across something else to shoot while walking back
    >>>> but this time the camera behaved impeccably. The only
    >>>> thing I can think of is that for at least a couple of hours
    >>>> while I was working I allowed the camera to continually
    >>>> drop into sleep mode when I was lining up the next shot. I
    >>>> can imagine some kind of software fault associated with
    >>>> sleep mode that messes up the internal memory in some
    >>>> manner. After switching off and on again, thereby rebooting,
    >>>> everything was OK. Also, it's been fine again today.
    >>>>
    >>>> Sound famliar to anyone ?
    >>>
    >>>Did you have light coming in through the eyepiece? There's a cap for it
    >>>so your exposure times aren't too short when you're not holding the
    >>>camera to your face. It's especially important at night or with lenses
    >>>that aren't very bright.

    >>
    >>Wait a minute...
    >>
    >>I need to mark this down as reason #137 of why DSLRs are worse than high-end P&S
    >>cameras.

    >
    >#1 being that you're an idiot?
    >
    >> In non-DSLR cameras the metering is taken right from the CCD so there's
    >>never any possibility of stray light wrongly influencing the exposure settings.

    >
    >Which is another reason why P&S cameras suck down batteries so fast.


    600+ shots, half with flash (some in high-speed fill-flash sync at 1/2000th
    second shutter speed, something you can *never* do) on a fresh battery charge.
    Or how about 10+ hours of 640x480 30fps high-quality video with 44.1kHz stereo
    sound (oh, you can't even do any of that at all) on one set of AAs. Yeah, that's
    quite some setback to worry about. I wonder when battery life will start to
    concern me. (It still hasn't in over 5 years of shooting and over 70,000 photos
    later.)

    Keep trying to justify why you waste your money on DSLR designs, it's fun to
    watch all the DSLR owners squirm every time I mention or point out all the
    drawbacks and limitations that a DSLR has.

    LOL

    (watch! they're going to do it again! :) )
    X-Man, May 26, 2007
    #6
  7. "X-Man" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > Keep trying to justify why you waste your money on DSLR designs, it's fun
    > to
    > watch all the DSLR owners squirm every time I mention or point out all the
    > drawbacks and limitations that a DSLR has.
    >
    > LOL
    >
    > (watch! they're going to do it again! :) )


    Let me give it a try. :)

    The easy answer is, "the right tool for the right job". In some situations
    and for some uses P&S IS the right tool. For other uses an SLR is the right
    tool. If what you want is a camera that is compact and takes good snapshots
    and has lots of other non-still photo functions, a P&S is the right tool. If
    you are more into being creative and "pushing the envelope" such as very low
    light or strange lens effects the ability to change lenses or manually set a
    wide range of settings, the SLR is the right tool. No tool is absolutely
    perfect for every use. Even among the various cameras within the SLR or P&S
    categories are perfect for every situation. That is why there is such a
    variety of cameras. If you find the camera(s) that fit you physically and
    fits the uses you want to put to it, then that is the right tool.

    I have used several P&S camera (and have one as a carry around everywhere
    camera) and have been very happy with it. But for some situations where I am
    going out to specifically be creative I use my DSLR where I have many more
    choices available. For example none of the P&S cameras I have used have
    allowed me to shoot under a Bulb setting which allows me to make 30 sec or
    more exposures. My SLR does. For fast changing situations the shutter lag
    between pressing the shutter release and the actual capture of the image is
    much better with my DSLR than with any of the P&S cameras I have tried. On
    the other hand I don't carry my SLR and my entire kit with me when I am
    going to the grocery store on the off chance I might see something of
    interrest. But I always have the little P&S incase the geese who live in the
    pond at the end of the grocery store parking lot have decided to take their
    tiny goslings for a walk. I get the picture and I'm happy. A case of the
    right tool at the right time.

    Now I will agree I have not tried every single camera out there and there
    may be a camera out there that combines the P&S multi format abilities and
    the compactness of P&S while also having the flexability and range of
    specialty lenses available with my SLR. So far I have not seen it, but it is
    possible.

    For you it is obvious that the P&S camera you use is the absolutely correct
    camera for you, and I wish you well with it. But please understand that not
    all of us are looking for the same things you are. And for some of us the
    choice to employ a DSLR is right for us.

    Randy

    ==========
    Randy Berbaum
    Champaign, IL
    Randy Berbaum, May 26, 2007
    #7
  8. Chris Gilbert

    Ray Fischer Guest

    X-Man <> wrote:
    >On 26 May 2007 04:02:51 GMT, (Ray Fischer) wrote:
    >
    >>X-Man <> wrote:
    >>>On Fri, 25 May 2007 20:35:09 -0700, Kevin McMurtrie <>
    >>>wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>In article <pMD5i.898$>,
    >>>> "Chris Gilbert" <> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Have any 30D users come across a situation where the
    >>>>> camera throws the shutter for less time then indicated by
    >>>>> metering ? I was shooting late yesterday and the camera
    >>>>> persistently misbehaved, seriously underexposing the shot.
    >>>>> Curiously, I switched off and packed to head off home and
    >>>>> came across something else to shoot while walking back
    >>>>> but this time the camera behaved impeccably. The only
    >>>>> thing I can think of is that for at least a couple of hours
    >>>>> while I was working I allowed the camera to continually
    >>>>> drop into sleep mode when I was lining up the next shot. I
    >>>>> can imagine some kind of software fault associated with
    >>>>> sleep mode that messes up the internal memory in some
    >>>>> manner. After switching off and on again, thereby rebooting,
    >>>>> everything was OK. Also, it's been fine again today.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Sound famliar to anyone ?
    >>>>
    >>>>Did you have light coming in through the eyepiece? There's a cap for it
    >>>>so your exposure times aren't too short when you're not holding the
    >>>>camera to your face. It's especially important at night or with lenses
    >>>>that aren't very bright.
    >>>
    >>>Wait a minute...
    >>>
    >>>I need to mark this down as reason #137 of why DSLRs are worse than high-end P&S
    >>>cameras.

    >>
    >>#1 being that you're an idiot?
    >>
    >>> In non-DSLR cameras the metering is taken right from the CCD so there's
    >>>never any possibility of stray light wrongly influencing the exposure settings.

    >>
    >>Which is another reason why P&S cameras suck down batteries so fast.

    >
    >600+ shots, half with flash (some in high-speed fill-flash sync at 1/2000th
    >second shutter speed, something you can *never* do) on a fresh battery charge.


    As opposed to several thousand for an SLR?

    >Or how about 10+ hours of 640x480 30fps high-quality video with 44.1kHz stereo
    >sound (oh, you can't even do any of that at all) on one set of AAs.


    LOL! Making up stories, now?

    --
    Ray Fischer
    Ray Fischer, May 26, 2007
    #8
  9. X-Man wrote:

    >
    > Keep trying to justify why you waste your money on DSLR designs, it's fun to
    > watch all the DSLR owners squirm every time I mention or point out all the
    > drawbacks and limitations that a DSLR has.


    All of 'em, huh?

    There are at least a handful here who care about image quality over a
    wide variety of situations.

    You've become boorish, or maybe you always were and I am just realizing it.

    --
    lsmft
    John McWilliams, May 26, 2007
    #9
  10. Chris Gilbert

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, X-Man
    <> wrote:

    > 600+ shots, half with flash (some in high-speed fill-flash sync at 1/2000th
    > second shutter speed, something you can *never* do) on a fresh battery charge.


    in typical use (some flash, some use of lcd, etc.) the nikon d50 will
    last roughly 1200-1500 shots per battery charge and i've heard of
    people getting 2000 shots per charge.

    high speed flash sync is available at all shutter speeds, which is
    1/4000th on the d50 and as high as 1/8000th with other nikon cameras.
    normal flash sync is 1/500th on the d50.

    > Keep trying to justify why you waste your money on DSLR designs, it's fun to
    > watch all the DSLR owners squirm every time I mention or point out all the
    > drawbacks and limitations that a DSLR has.


    except you seem to be misinformed about what a dslr can and cannot do.
    nor do you mention the drawbacks and limitations of a point and shoot
    camera.
    nospam, May 26, 2007
    #10
  11. In article <>,
    X-Man <> wrote:

    > On Fri, 25 May 2007 20:35:09 -0700, Kevin McMurtrie <>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >In article <pMD5i.898$>,
    > > "Chris Gilbert" <> wrote:
    > >
    > >> Have any 30D users come across a situation where the
    > >> camera throws the shutter for less time then indicated by
    > >> metering ? I was shooting late yesterday and the camera
    > >> persistently misbehaved, seriously underexposing the shot.
    > >> Curiously, I switched off and packed to head off home and
    > >> came across something else to shoot while walking back
    > >> but this time the camera behaved impeccably. The only
    > >> thing I can think of is that for at least a couple of hours
    > >> while I was working I allowed the camera to continually
    > >> drop into sleep mode when I was lining up the next shot. I
    > >> can imagine some kind of software fault associated with
    > >> sleep mode that messes up the internal memory in some
    > >> manner. After switching off and on again, thereby rebooting,
    > >> everything was OK. Also, it's been fine again today.
    > >>
    > >> Sound famliar to anyone ?
    > >>
    > >> Chris
    > >> --
    > >> Chris Gilbert Photography
    > >> www.ravenseyegallery.co.uk

    > >
    > >Did you have light coming in through the eyepiece? There's a cap for it
    > >so your exposure times aren't too short when you're not holding the
    > >camera to your face. It's especially important at night or with lenses
    > >that aren't very bright.

    >
    > Wait a minute...
    >
    > I need to mark this down as reason #137 of why DSLRs are worse than high-end
    > P&S
    > cameras. In non-DSLR cameras the metering is taken right from the CCD so
    > there's
    > never any possibility of stray light wrongly influencing the exposure
    > settings.
    > This was always a problem from the equivalent SLR technology from the last
    > century too. Nice to see that it still exists in DSLRs today. But then, it
    > has
    > to, since DSLRs are using last century's technology. With no way to ever get
    > around its insurmountable faults and limitations.
    >
    > Okay, I have it marked down .... do continue ...


    Do you even own a tripod?
    Kevin McMurtrie, May 26, 2007
    #11
  12. Kevin McMurtrie wrote

    > Did you have light coming in through the eyepiece?


    Ah, now that's very plausible. I'll look out for it.

    Thanks Kevin.

    Chris
    Chris Gilbert, May 26, 2007
    #12
  13. Chris Gilbert

    photo king Guest


    >
    >Wait a minute...
    >
    >I need to mark this down as reason #137 of why DSLRs are worse than high-end P&S
    >cameras. In non-DSLR cameras the metering is taken right from the CCD so there's
    >never any possibility of stray light wrongly influencing the exposure settings.
    >This was always a problem from the equivalent SLR technology from the last
    >century too. Nice to see that it still exists in DSLRs today. But then, it has
    >to, since DSLRs are using last century's technology. With no way to ever get
    >around its insurmountable faults and limitations.
    >
    >Okay, I have it marked down .... do continue ...


    Just the comment I would expect from the man who says a cheap package
    like photoline is better then CS3, now DSLR are not worth having over
    a point and shoot.This says it all you are poor and cannot afford
    decent gear and jealous of others who can you just on sad person
    photo king, May 26, 2007
    #13
  14. Chris Gilbert

    Allen Guest

    photo king wrote:
    >> Wait a minute...
    >>
    >> I need to mark this down as reason #137 of why DSLRs are worse than high-end P&S
    >> cameras. In non-DSLR cameras the metering is taken right from the CCD so there's
    >> never any possibility of stray light wrongly influencing the exposure settings.
    >> This was always a problem from the equivalent SLR technology from the last
    >> century too. Nice to see that it still exists in DSLRs today. But then, it has
    >> to, since DSLRs are using last century's technology. With no way to ever get
    >> around its insurmountable faults and limitations.
    >>
    >> Okay, I have it marked down .... do continue ...

    >
    > Just the comment I would expect from the man who says a cheap package
    > like photoline is better then CS3, now DSLR are not worth having over
    > a point and shoot.This says it all you are poor and cannot afford
    > decent gear and jealous of others who can you just on sad person
    >

    This thread has me puzzled about one thing, and it's _not_ DSLR vs P&S.
    It is: Why does anyone _not_ have X-Man in their killfile?
    Allen
    Allen, May 26, 2007
    #14
  15. Randy Berbaum wrote:

    > Let me give it a try. :)
    >
    > The easy answer is, "the right tool for the right job". In some situations
    > and for some uses P&S IS the right tool. For other uses an SLR is the right
    > tool.



    >For example none of the P&S cameras I have used have
    > allowed me to shoot under a Bulb setting which allows me to make 30 sec or
    > more exposures. My SLR does.


    But more important that Bulb is Time ... which seems to have died with the
    Nikon F.

    But if one thinks about it, consider the following camera:

    Remove the mirror and pentaprism from a digital SLR. Put the
    LCD viewscreen inside, viewed through an eyepiece like the SLR has.
    This screen would have to be miniaturized of course, and
    with enough pixels (say 500,000 or more). Fix the shutter so
    it can be held full open without using power (this can be done.)
    The viewscreen, normally, shows what the open-shutter CCD does.
    While doing this, of course, it eats the batteries .. but at least
    it's small and since you are looking through a viewer, does not have
    to be ultra-bright. The camera can use the CCD for light metering and
    autofocus. When you shoot, the shutter closes, the CCD
    is cleared, and then it takes a picture like an SLR.

    Otherwise, except for one thing you have an SLR more or less.
    You still have the same lens interchangeability.
    True, you don't have full resolution on the viewer ... but there is the
    Zoom button, for depth of field or close focus preview.

    But there is one thing that is in fact better than an SLR on this
    beast: no mirror means it can use Leica "viewfinder" style
    non-retrofocus wide angle lenses, since the back of the lens
    can be close to the sensor.

    I do wonder if the Achilles heel of this idea is the problem of
    using the CCD for autofocus in low light.

    Comments?

    Doug McDonald
    Doug McDonald, May 26, 2007
    #15
  16. Chris Gilbert

    M-M Guest

    In article <>,
    X-Man <> wrote:

    > DSLRs are using last century's technology



    And cars still have 4 wheels, a windshield and a motor.

    --
    m-m
    M-M, May 26, 2007
    #16
  17. M-M wrote:
    > In article <>,
    > X-Man <> wrote:
    >
    >> DSLRs are using last century's technology

    >
    >
    > And cars still have 4 wheels, a windshield and a motor.


    My DSLRs are using this C's tech, although one of my lenses is a
    holdover from the Dark Ages.....

    --
    lsmft
    John McWilliams, May 26, 2007
    #17
  18. Chris Gilbert

    X-Man Guest

    On Sat, 26 May 2007 08:39:16 GMT, photo king <> wrote:

    >
    >>
    >>Wait a minute...
    >>
    >>I need to mark this down as reason #137 of why DSLRs are worse than high-end P&S
    >>cameras. In non-DSLR cameras the metering is taken right from the CCD so there's
    >>never any possibility of stray light wrongly influencing the exposure settings.
    >>This was always a problem from the equivalent SLR technology from the last
    >>century too. Nice to see that it still exists in DSLRs today. But then, it has
    >>to, since DSLRs are using last century's technology. With no way to ever get
    >>around its insurmountable faults and limitations.
    >>
    >>Okay, I have it marked down .... do continue ...

    >
    >Just the comment I would expect from the man who says a cheap package
    >like photoline is better then CS3, now DSLR are not worth having over
    >a point and shoot.This says it all you are poor and cannot afford
    >decent gear and jealous of others who can you just on sad person


    Jealous? Poor? LOL ... I just know where to put my money where it does the most
    (hint, that's how you GET wealthy, try it sometime), and it doesn't happen by
    backing the sad sheep-following fools that can only offer last-century advice
    because they're too stupid to learn anything new.
    X-Man, May 27, 2007
    #18
  19. Chris Gilbert

    Photo King Guest

    On Sat, 26 May 2007 21:18:24 -0500, X-Man <> wrote:

    >On Sat, 26 May 2007 08:39:16 GMT, photo king <> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>>
    >>>Wait a minute...
    >>>
    >>>I need to mark this down as reason #137 of why DSLRs are worse than high-end P&S
    >>>cameras. In non-DSLR cameras the metering is taken right from the CCD so there's
    >>>never any possibility of stray light wrongly influencing the exposure settings.
    >>>This was always a problem from the equivalent SLR technology from the last
    >>>century too. Nice to see that it still exists in DSLRs today. But then, it has
    >>>to, since DSLRs are using last century's technology. With no way to ever get
    >>>around its insurmountable faults and limitations.
    >>>
    >>>Okay, I have it marked down .... do continue ...

    >>
    >>Just the comment I would expect from the man who says a cheap package
    >>like photoline is better then CS3, now DSLR are not worth having over
    >>a point and shoot.This says it all you are poor and cannot afford
    >>decent gear and jealous of others who can you just on sad person

    >
    >Jealous? Poor? LOL ... I just know where to put my money where it does the most
    >(hint, that's how you GET wealthy, try it sometime), and it doesn't happen by
    >backing the sad sheep-following fools that can only offer last-century advice
    >because they're too stupid to learn anything new.



    LOL last century as I have used photoline against PSP and CS3 I cannot
    see where you are coming from with that statement, and as for point
    and shoots they have there place and I do use them, but they come
    nowhere near my DSLR for flexibility especially when it comes to low
    noise high ISO use in low light conditions.
    There other reasons to own a dslr as well but I cannot be bothered
    now as you are just as I have confirmed a poor jealous Troll.

    I dont need your hints on wealth I done very nicely in life already.
    Photo King, May 27, 2007
    #19
  20. Chris Gilbert

    Bucky Guest

    On May 25, 10:07 pm, nospam <> wrote:
    > except you seem to be misinformed about what a dslr can and cannot do.
    > nor do you mention the drawbacks and limitations of a point and shoot
    > camera.


    exactly. yes, there are drawbacks to a DSLR, but there is also for
    high end P&S. different tools for different purposes. here's a good
    article:

    http://www.imaging-resource.com/ACCS/SLRvsDIGICAM/SLRA.HTM
    Bucky, May 27, 2007
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. BASeCamper

    Odd behaviour with FF, but not IE...

    BASeCamper, Sep 20, 2006, in forum: Firefox
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    408
    BASeCamper
    Sep 20, 2006
  2. jils

    odd behaviour in win xp

    jils, Oct 25, 2006, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    9
    Views:
    558
  3. Gib Bogle

    Odd ADSL behaviour

    Gib Bogle, Aug 3, 2003, in forum: NZ Computing
    Replies:
    6
    Views:
    387
  4. Roger Mills

    Skypephone S2 odd behaviour

    Roger Mills, Apr 5, 2012, in forum: UK VOIP
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    903
    Graham.
    Apr 6, 2012
  5. Gib Bogle

    An odd Windows behaviour

    Gib Bogle, Mar 7, 2013, in forum: NZ Computing
    Replies:
    34
    Views:
    967
    Gib Bogle
    Mar 13, 2013
Loading...

Share This Page