30 SECONDS WITH THE 20D !!!

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Annika1980, Oct 19, 2004.

  1. Annika1980

    Annika1980 Guest

    Annika1980, Oct 19, 2004
    #1
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  2. Annika1980

    Phil Wheeler Guest

    Phil Wheeler, Oct 19, 2004
    #2
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  3. "Phil Wheeler" <> wrote in message
    news:Kx%cd.17829$...
    > Sure a lot of hot pixels :)
    >
    > Annika1980 wrote:
    >> http://www.pbase.com/bret/image/35233613


    Those are of course stars, far more than could probably be seen with the
    naked eye. The picture may have hit 8th magnitude. I would like to
    identify the star field or have the same photographer take a picture, under
    similar conditions, of a constellation I can identify, such as the Pleiades
    star cluster rising in the east after the moon sets.

    The long exposure causes the stars to lengthen slightly due to the earth's
    rotation. That is very handy for distinguishing them from hot pixels.

    Clear skies,

    Michael A. Covington
    Author, Astrophotography for the Amateur
    www.covingtoninnovations.com/astromenu.html
    Michael A. Covington, Oct 19, 2004
    #3
  4. Annika1980

    Matt Ion Guest

    Matt Ion, Oct 19, 2004
    #4
  5. Annika1980

    Phil Wheeler Guest

    Michael A. Covington wrote:
    > "Phil Wheeler" <> wrote in message
    > news:Kx%cd.17829$...
    >
    >>Sure a lot of hot pixels :)
    >>
    >>Annika1980 wrote:
    >>
    >>>http://www.pbase.com/bret/image/35233613

    >
    >
    > Those are of course stars, far more than could probably be seen with the
    > naked eye. The picture may have hit 8th magnitude. I would like to
    > identify the star field or have the same photographer take a picture, under
    > similar conditions, of a constellation I can identify, such as the Pleiades
    > star cluster rising in the east after the moon sets.
    >
    > The long exposure causes the stars to lengthen slightly due to the earth's
    > rotation. That is very handy for distinguishing them from hot pixels.
    >


    Only because it was not tracking :) Otherwise, I often wonder if one
    could pick out a hot pixel from a star. BTW -- I have your excellent book.

    I saw a great shot posted recently (where I wonder, now?) with ten
    Messier objects identified in the FOV; taken with a 1Ds and a Canon 100
    mm f/2.8 macro.

    Phil
    Phil Wheeler, Oct 19, 2004
    #5
  6. Annika1980

    Hugh Jorgan Guest

    Hugh Jorgan, Oct 19, 2004
    #6
  7. Annika1980

    Annika1980 Guest

    >From: "Michael A. Covington" ess

    >http://www.pbase.com/bret/image/35233613
    >
    >Those are of course stars, far more than could probably be seen with the
    >naked eye. The picture may have hit 8th magnitude.


    Here is a better one of Cassiopeia, showing slight star blur due to the long
    exposure. I think you'll recognize a few things in there.

    http://www.pbase.com/bret/image/35252797/original

    I went up to Mt. Haleakala with a clear dark sky. It was amazing. It was like
    driving right into the Big Dipper. I kept seeing this light atop the mountain,
    but when I finally got out of my car at about 9000 feet I noticed it was Venus.

    Btw, what is a good low-cost tracking device that I can use to track the stars
    with my DSLR?
    Annika1980, Oct 19, 2004
    #7
  8. Annika1980

    Phil Wheeler Guest

    Phil Wheeler, Oct 19, 2004
    #8
  9. Bart van der Wolf, Oct 19, 2004
    #9
  10. "Annika1980" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    > Here is a better one of Cassiopeia, showing slight star blur due to the
    > long
    > exposure. I think you'll recognize a few things in there.
    >
    > http://www.pbase.com/bret/image/35252797/original


    Excellent -- I'll have a look and get back to you!

    > I went up to Mt. Haleakala with a clear dark sky. It was amazing. It was
    > like
    > driving right into the Big Dipper. I kept seeing this light atop the
    > mountain,
    > but when I finally got out of my car at about 9000 feet I noticed it was
    > Venus.
    >
    > Btw, what is a good low-cost tracking device that I can use to track the
    > stars
    > with my DSLR?


    I suggest a barn-door tracker. Google for the term "barn-door tracker" or
    see my book. But you should be able to find lots of instructions by
    Googling.

    In Hawaii you'll have to have an unobstructed north horizon in order to see
    Polaris and line the tracker up.

    By the way, I liked your picture of the green anole (American chameleon,
    mistakenly called a gecko by many people on Maui; it's actually an iguanid,
    imported recently from Florida or the Caribbean).

    Keep up the good work!
    Michael


    --
    Clear skies,

    Michael A. Covington
    Author, Astrophotography for the Amateur
    www.covingtoninnovations.com/astromenu.html
    Michael A. Covington, Oct 19, 2004
    #10
  11. > http://www.pbase.com/bret/image/35252797/original

    Not bad at all. You have stars down to at least magnitude 7.8; also some
    mirror flop or something at the beginning of the exposure. The lack of hot
    pixels is remarkable! Does your camera take a dark frame immediately
    afterward and subtract it?
    Michael A. Covington, Oct 19, 2004
    #11
  12. Annika1980

    Phil Wheeler Guest

    The 20D does have that capability, if enabled. Don't know if she used
    it. When I get a chance I will piggyback mine on my NS8GPS and see what
    I get. Hot pixels should be ok per DeadPixelTest.

    Phil

    Michael A. Covington wrote:
    >>http://www.pbase.com/bret/image/35252797/original

    >
    >
    > Not bad at all. You have stars down to at least magnitude 7.8; also some
    > mirror flop or something at the beginning of the exposure. The lack of hot
    > pixels is remarkable! Does your camera take a dark frame immediately
    > afterward and subtract it?
    >
    >
    Phil Wheeler, Oct 20, 2004
    #12
  13. Annika1980

    Matt Ion Guest

    Michael A. Covington wrote:

    > "Annika1980" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >
    >>Here is a better one of Cassiopeia, showing slight star blur due to the
    >>long
    >>exposure. I think you'll recognize a few things in there.
    >>
    >>http://www.pbase.com/bret/image/35252797/original

    >
    >
    > Excellent -- I'll have a look and get back to you!
    >
    >
    >>I went up to Mt. Haleakala with a clear dark sky. It was amazing. It was
    >>like
    >>driving right into the Big Dipper. I kept seeing this light atop the
    >>mountain,
    >>but when I finally got out of my car at about 9000 feet I noticed it was
    >>Venus.
    >>
    >>Btw, what is a good low-cost tracking device that I can use to track the
    >>stars
    >>with my DSLR?

    >
    >
    > I suggest a barn-door tracker. Google for the term "barn-door tracker" or
    > see my book. But you should be able to find lots of instructions by
    > Googling.


    He wants to track stars, not barn doors. ;)
    Matt Ion, Oct 20, 2004
    #13
  14. Annika1980

    Annika1980 Guest

    >From: "Michael A. Covington" ess

    >http://www.pbase.com/bret/image/35252797/original
    >
    >Not bad at all. You have stars down to at least magnitude 7.8; also some
    >mirror flop or something at the beginning of the exposure. The lack of hot
    >pixels is remarkable! Does your camera take a dark frame immediately
    >afterward and subtract it?


    Yes, there is a Custom Function on the 20D for dark frame processing on long
    exposures. The only disadvantage is that it takes the same amount of time (as
    the shutter speed) to process the image before you can shoot another.

    The Canon 20D is clearly the DSLR to use for Astrophotography.
    Annika1980, Oct 20, 2004
    #14
  15. Annika1980

    Annika1980 Guest

    >From: "Michael A. Covington" ess

    >I suggest a barn-door tracker. Google for the term "barn-door tracker" or
    >see my book. But you should be able to find lots of instructions by
    >Googling.
    >
    >In Hawaii you'll have to have an unobstructed north horizon in order to see
    >Polaris and line the tracker up.


    On Haleakala, you'll have an unobstructed view in ANY direction.

    >By the way, I liked your picture of the green anole (American chameleon,
    >mistakenly called a gecko by many people on Maui; it's actually an iguanid,
    >imported recently from Florida or the Caribbean).


    So noted. Thanks for the advice on the barn door thingy. Does anyone sell
    them pre-assembled?
    Annika1980, Oct 20, 2004
    #15
  16. Annika1980

    Annika1980 Guest

    >From: "Michael A. Covington" ess

    >By the way, I liked your picture of the green anole (American chameleon,
    >mistakenly called a gecko by many people on Maui; it's actually an iguanid,
    >imported recently from Florida or the Caribbean).


    Do you know what this guy is?
    http://www.pbase.com/bret/image/29325594
    Annika1980, Oct 20, 2004
    #16
  17. Annika1980

    Matt Ion Guest

    Annika1980 wrote:
    >>From: "Michael A. Covington" ess

    >
    >
    >>By the way, I liked your picture of the green anole (American chameleon,
    >>mistakenly called a gecko by many people on Maui; it's actually an iguanid,
    >>imported recently from Florida or the Caribbean).

    >
    >
    > Do you know what this guy is?
    > http://www.pbase.com/bret/image/29325594


    Striped?
    Matt Ion, Oct 20, 2004
    #17
  18. Annika1980

    Jer Guest

    Annika1980 wrote:

    >>From: "Michael A. Covington" ess

    >
    >
    >>By the way, I liked your picture of the green anole (American chameleon,
    >>mistakenly called a gecko by many people on Maui; it's actually an iguanid,
    >>imported recently from Florida or the Caribbean).

    >
    >
    > Do you know what this guy is?
    > http://www.pbase.com/bret/image/29325594
    >
    >



    Skink?

    --
    jer email reply - I am not a 'ten'
    Jer, Oct 20, 2004
    #18

  19. > So noted. Thanks for the advice on the barn door thingy. Does anyone
    > sell
    > them pre-assembled?


    I have no idea! If nobody chimes in with an answer here, try
    sci.astro.amateur.

    Clear skies,
    Michael
    Michael A. Covington, Oct 20, 2004
    #19
  20. "Annika1980" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > >From: "Michael A. Covington" ess

    >
    >>By the way, I liked your picture of the green anole (American chameleon,
    >>mistakenly called a gecko by many people on Maui; it's actually an
    >>iguanid,
    >>imported recently from Florida or the Caribbean).

    >
    > Do you know what this guy is?
    > http://www.pbase.com/bret/image/29325594


    A skink or racerunner, but I'm not 100% sure what kind. He looks very
    familiar. Did you find him on Maui or on the mainland? If you'll tell me
    the location, I can look him up. Nice picture!
    Michael A. Covington, Oct 20, 2004
    #20
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