28mm or 50mm Fixed focus lens for Canon dRebel

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Siddhartha Jain, Nov 8, 2004.

  1. Hi,

    The 50mm fixed focus lens is usually highly recommended for 35mm SLRs
    given its low price and good optical qualities. I was wondering would
    it be same for digital SLRs with 1.6x crop factor or is a 28mm more
    suited for dSLRs?

    Optically, is a Canon 28mm f2.8 as good as the 50mm f1.8 in terms of
    barrel distortion etc?

    Thanks,

    Siddhartha
     
    Siddhartha Jain, Nov 8, 2004
    #1
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  2. Siddhartha Jain

    BG250 Guest

    I have the 50mm. It is a sharp lens, but it is too long on the dRebel. The
    28mm will give you about the same angle of view as a 45mm lens in 35mm film.

    I'm not familiar with the Canon 28, but my experience with other 28mm lenses
    are that they have more barrel distortion and may be softer in the corners
    at wide apertures. You do loose more than a stop of light going from f/1.8
    to f/2.8. The sharpness of the 50/1.8 makes it very useful even wide open.
    bg

    "Siddhartha Jain" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi,
    >
    > The 50mm fixed focus lens is usually highly recommended for 35mm SLRs
    > given its low price and good optical qualities. I was wondering would
    > it be same for digital SLRs with 1.6x crop factor or is a 28mm more
    > suited for dSLRs?
    >
    > Optically, is a Canon 28mm f2.8 as good as the 50mm f1.8 in terms of
    > barrel distortion etc?
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Siddhartha
    >
     
    BG250, Nov 8, 2004
    #2
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  3. Siddhartha Jain wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > The 50mm fixed focus lens is usually highly recommended for 35mm SLRs
    > given its low price and good optical qualities. I was wondering would
    > it be same for digital SLRs with 1.6x crop factor or is a 28mm more
    > suited for dSLRs?
    >
    > Optically, is a Canon 28mm f2.8 as good as the 50mm f1.8 in terms of
    > barrel distortion etc?
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Siddhartha


    For digitals with crop factors those very good and inexpensive ~50mm
    fairly fast lenses are recommended for portrait work.

    Keep in mind that any standard 35mm lens you use with a cropping digital
    will not be able to provide the same total resolution as it can on a
    standard 35mm since you will be throwing away about 30% of the image the
    lens could have produced on a full size 35mm.
    --
    Joseph E. Meehan

    26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
     
    Joseph Meehan, Nov 8, 2004
    #3
  4. "BG250" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I have the 50mm. It is a sharp lens, but it is too long on the dRebel. The
    > 28mm will give you about the same angle of view as a 45mm lens in 35mm
    > film.
    >
    > I'm not familiar with the Canon 28, but my experience with other 28mm
    > lenses
    > are that they have more barrel distortion and may be softer in the corners
    > at wide apertures. You do loose more than a stop of light going from f/1.8
    > to f/2.8. The sharpness of the 50/1.8 makes it very useful even wide open.
    > bg


    I'm not that pessimistic about the 28. Remember, you're not using the
    corners. Doesn't Canon also make a 28/2?
     
    Michael A. Covington, Nov 8, 2004
    #4
  5. Siddhartha Jain

    PhotoMan Guest

    BG250 wrote:
    > I have the 50mm. It is a sharp lens, but it is too long on the
    > dRebel. The 28mm will give you about the same angle of view as a 45mm
    > lens in 35mm film.
    >
    > I'm not familiar with the Canon 28, but my experience with other 28mm
    > lenses are that they have more barrel distortion and may be softer in
    > the corners at wide apertures. You do loose more than a stop of light


    Actually, it's about 1/2 stop. ƒ3.5 would be a full stop.
     
    PhotoMan, Nov 8, 2004
    #5
  6. Siddhartha Jain

    PhotoMan Guest

    Joseph Meehan wrote:
    > Siddhartha Jain wrote:
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >> The 50mm fixed focus lens is usually highly recommended for 35mm SLRs
    >> given its low price and good optical qualities. I was wondering would
    >> it be same for digital SLRs with 1.6x crop factor or is a 28mm more
    >> suited for dSLRs?
    >>
    >> Optically, is a Canon 28mm f2.8 as good as the 50mm f1.8 in terms of
    >> barrel distortion etc?
    >>
    >> Thanks,
    >>
    >> Siddhartha

    >
    > For digitals with crop factors those very good and inexpensive
    > ~50mm fairly fast lenses are recommended for portrait work.
    >
    > Keep in mind that any standard 35mm lens you use with a cropping
    > digital will not be able to provide the same total resolution as it
    > can on a standard 35mm since you will be throwing away about 30% of
    > the image the lens could have produced on a full size 35mm.


    An advantage of the crop factor is that you're utilizing the central 'sweet
    spot' of the lens. There won't be very much, if any vignetting, corner
    softness and barrel distortion.
     
    PhotoMan, Nov 8, 2004
    #6
  7. Siddhartha Jain

    YAG-ART Guest

    On 8 Nov 2004 02:23:43 -0800, "Siddhartha Jain"
    <> wrote:

    >Hi,
    >
    >The 50mm fixed focus lens is usually highly recommended for 35mm SLRs
    >given its low price and good optical qualities. I was wondering would
    >it be same for digital SLRs with 1.6x crop factor or is a 28mm more
    >suited for dSLRs?



    Well, what are you using it for?
     
    YAG-ART, Nov 8, 2004
    #7
  8. Siddhartha Jain

    YAG-ART Guest

    On Mon, 8 Nov 2004 09:56:03 -0500, "Michael A. Covington"
    <> wrote:

    >
    >"BG250" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >>I have the 50mm. It is a sharp lens, but it is too long on the dRebel. The
    >> 28mm will give you about the same angle of view as a 45mm lens in 35mm
    >> film.
    >>
    >> I'm not familiar with the Canon 28, but my experience with other 28mm
    >> lenses
    >> are that they have more barrel distortion and may be softer in the corners
    >> at wide apertures. You do loose more than a stop of light going from f/1.8
    >> to f/2.8. The sharpness of the 50/1.8 makes it very useful even wide open.
    >> bg

    >
    >I'm not that pessimistic about the 28. Remember, you're not using the
    >corners. Doesn't Canon also make a 28/2?


    Canon makes a 28 1.8 USM and a 28 2.8 non-usm
     
    YAG-ART, Nov 8, 2004
    #8
  9. Siddhartha Jain

    PhotoMan Guest

    YAG-ART wrote:
    > Canon makes a 28 1.8 USM and a 28 2.8 non-usm


    The 2.8 is about $165., and the 1.8 $400.
     
    PhotoMan, Nov 8, 2004
    #9
  10. "PhotoMan" <> wrote in message
    news:d5Mjd.280369$...
    > BG250 wrote:
    >> I have the 50mm. It is a sharp lens, but it is too long on the
    >> dRebel. The 28mm will give you about the same angle of view as a 45mm
    >> lens in 35mm film.
    >>
    >> I'm not familiar with the Canon 28, but my experience with other 28mm
    >> lenses are that they have more barrel distortion and may be softer in
    >> the corners at wide apertures. You do loose more than a stop of light

    >
    > Actually, it's about 1/2 stop. ƒ3.5 would be a full stop.


    From f/1.8 to f/2.5, or from f/2 to f/2.8, would be a full stop. f/1.8 to
    f/2.8 is slightly more than a stop.

    Remember, f-ratio squared is inversely proportional to brightness.
    Consecutive f-stops (differing by a factor of 2 in brightness) differ by a
    factor of sqrt(2) = 1.414.
     
    Michael A. Covington, Nov 8, 2004
    #10
  11. PhotoMan wrote:
    > Joseph Meehan wrote:
    >> Siddhartha Jain wrote:
    >>> Hi,
    >>>
    >>> The 50mm fixed focus lens is usually highly recommended for 35mm SLRs
    >>> given its low price and good optical qualities. I was wondering would
    >>> it be same for digital SLRs with 1.6x crop factor or is a 28mm more
    >>> suited for dSLRs?
    >>>
    >>> Optically, is a Canon 28mm f2.8 as good as the 50mm f1.8 in terms of
    >>> barrel distortion etc?
    >>>
    >>> Thanks,
    >>>
    >>> Siddhartha

    >>
    >> For digitals with crop factors those very good and inexpensive
    >> ~50mm fairly fast lenses are recommended for portrait work.
    >>
    >> Keep in mind that any standard 35mm lens you use with a cropping
    >> digital will not be able to provide the same total resolution as it
    >> can on a standard 35mm since you will be throwing away about 30% of
    >> the image the lens could have produced on a full size 35mm.

    >
    > An advantage of the crop factor is that you're utilizing the central
    > 'sweet
    > spot' of the lens. There won't be very much, if any vignetting, corner
    > softness and barrel distortion.


    I agree. I even made some adjustment in the numbers for that, but not
    likely enough for most lenses.

    --
    Joseph E. Meehan

    26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
     
    Joseph Meehan, Nov 8, 2004
    #11
  12. In article <6kMjd.280380$>,
    PhotoMan <> wrote:
    >YAG-ART wrote:
    >> Canon makes a 28 1.8 USM and a 28 2.8 non-usm

    >
    >The 2.8 is about $165., and the 1.8 $400.


    And _neither_ is as sharp as a non-retrofocus design that only covered
    the digital sensor would be. In fact, such a lens would be sharper
    than the 50mm normal lens: for a given design, shorter focal lengths
    are slightly sharper than longer.

    This would be a really good application for an EF-S lens. Shame they
    only make crummy, slow consumer zooms in EF-S.

    --
    Thor Lancelot Simon
    But as he knew no bad language, he had called him all the names of common
    objects that he could think of, and had screamed: "You lamp! You towel! You
    plate!" and so on. --Sigmund Freud
     
    Thor Lancelot Simon, Nov 8, 2004
    #12
  13. YAG-ART wrote:
    > On 8 Nov 2004 02:23:43 -0800, "Siddhartha Jain"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > >Hi,
    > >
    > >The 50mm fixed focus lens is usually highly recommended for 35mm

    SLRs
    > >given its low price and good optical qualities. I was wondering

    would
    > >it be same for digital SLRs with 1.6x crop factor or is a 28mm more
    > >suited for dSLRs?

    >
    >
    > Well, what are you using it for?


    If I am not shooting wildlife/nature then I rarely find myself using
    zoom on a camera (I had a OlyC-750 and now waiting for my 300D to
    arrive). I mostly shoot landscape and macros and zoom with my feet
    wherever I can. So I thought a fixed focus might be better in terms of
    optical quality compared to a zoom at the same focal length (say a
    Canon 18-55mm at 28mm vs. the Canon 28mm). And I can't afford the
    expensive "L" series.

    Cheers,

    Siddhartha
     
    Siddhartha Jain, Nov 8, 2004
    #13
  14. Siddhartha Jain

    YAG-ART Guest

    On 8 Nov 2004 10:15:54 -0800, "Siddhartha Jain"
    <> wrote:

    >YAG-ART wrote:
    >> On 8 Nov 2004 02:23:43 -0800, "Siddhartha Jain"
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >> >Hi,
    >> >
    >> >The 50mm fixed focus lens is usually highly recommended for 35mm

    >SLRs
    >> >given its low price and good optical qualities. I was wondering

    >would
    >> >it be same for digital SLRs with 1.6x crop factor or is a 28mm more
    >> >suited for dSLRs?

    >>
    >>
    >> Well, what are you using it for?

    >
    >If I am not shooting wildlife/nature then I rarely find myself using
    >zoom on a camera (I had a OlyC-750 and now waiting for my 300D to
    >arrive). I mostly shoot landscape and macros and zoom with my feet
    >wherever I can. So I thought a fixed focus might be better in terms of
    >optical quality compared to a zoom at the same focal length (say a
    >Canon 18-55mm at 28mm vs. the Canon 28mm). And I can't afford the
    >expensive "L" series.


    You may want to look at the 20mm lens if you shoot landscapes. I have
    a Canon D2000 and use a 28-105mm lens and a 50mm 1.8 lens. I don't
    see any issues with the 28-105mm. However if you prefer fixed focal
    length thats fine.
     
    YAG-ART, Nov 8, 2004
    #14
  15. Siddhartha Jain

    JohnR Guest

    "YAG-ART" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On 8 Nov 2004 10:15:54 -0800, "Siddhartha Jain"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > >YAG-ART wrote:
    > >> On 8 Nov 2004 02:23:43 -0800, "Siddhartha Jain"
    > >> <> wrote:
    > >>
    > >> >Hi,
    > >> >
    > >> >The 50mm fixed focus lens is usually highly recommended for 35mm

    > >SLRs
    > >> >given its low price and good optical qualities. I was wondering

    > >would
    > >> >it be same for digital SLRs with 1.6x crop factor or is a 28mm more
    > >> >suited for dSLRs?
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> Well, what are you using it for?

    > >
    > >If I am not shooting wildlife/nature then I rarely find myself using
    > >zoom on a camera (I had a OlyC-750 and now waiting for my 300D to
    > >arrive). I mostly shoot landscape and macros and zoom with my feet
    > >wherever I can. So I thought a fixed focus might be better in terms of
    > >optical quality compared to a zoom at the same focal length (say a
    > >Canon 18-55mm at 28mm vs. the Canon 28mm). And I can't afford the
    > >expensive "L" series.

    >
    > You may want to look at the 20mm lens if you shoot landscapes. I have
    > a Canon D2000 and use a 28-105mm lens and a 50mm 1.8 lens. I don't
    > see any issues with the 28-105mm. However if you prefer fixed focal
    > length thats fine.


    I agree with the wider angle lens for landscapes, in fact, the 18-55 may be
    all you need. You can stop it down and get sharp results. Its resolution
    will be higher than the camera can resolve. See my lens test:
    http://home.att.net/~jriegle/ltest.htm
    John
     
    JohnR, Nov 8, 2004
    #15
  16. Siddhartha Jain

    PhotoMan Guest

    Michael A. Covington wrote:
    > "PhotoMan" <> wrote in message
    >> Actually, it's about 1/2 stop. ƒ3.5 would be a full stop.

    >
    > From f/1.8 to f/2.5, or from f/2 to f/2.8, would be a full stop.
    > f/1.8 to f/2.8 is slightly more than a stop.


    You're absolutely correct. My bad :)
     
    PhotoMan, Nov 9, 2004
    #16
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