25/30/37/58mm Infrared 'X Ray' filter - SONY DV Cameras

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by yeo seng tong, Sep 4, 2004.

  1. Why you need to use an Infrared filter for 'X Ray' effect ?

    Sony has changed the Nightshot feature a few times during production.
    The first Sony camcorders could shoot Nightshot in the day. Then Sony
    found that people were using the camcorders to see through some
    clothing, so they changed the camcorders to have a fully open aperture
    in Nightshot mode. This meant in bright light, the picture is
    overexposed. Some of the most recent camcorders from Sony are somewhere
    in-between. One recent camcorder we have tested limits the minimum
    aperture but still adjusts the aperture wider. Interestingly, the result
    is that in Nightshot mode during daylight, the picture is overexposed
    without a filter. But, using Nightshot in daylight with an IR filter
    works! Perhaps Sony has realized that this feature helps sell cameras. 

    All Sony Digital Video Camera with the Nightshot/Nightshot Plus/Super
    Nightshot/Super Nightshot Plus feature are capable of achieving the
    X-Ray effect when used with the GTS2 Infrared filter. Seeing is
    beliveing. This infrared filter will filter out 99% of light seen by
    naked eye only allowing infrared light thru. Technically the naked eye
    can see 100% black with the help of this filter. Because with the night
    shot function on the naked eye cannot pick up the high contrast black.
    So with the GTS2 Infrared filter and your night shot function on, it
    will help u see title of a book with a piece of cloth place over it thus
    the x-ray effect.
      
    Available in 25mm(S$110), 30mm(S$110), 37mm(S$130) and 58mm(S$180) GTS2
    Infrared filter is made with High Grade Imported Infrared glass from
    JAPAN. Specially mounted in a Silverish Grey ring to match your Sony DV
    cam. This filter includes a round/flip open plastic carrying case.

    Buy it online at www.infraxfilter.com or ebay.com 'infrax1000filter'
     
    yeo seng tong, Sep 4, 2004
    #1
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  2. yeo seng tong

    Bob Salomon Guest

    In article <>,
    yeo seng tong <> wrote:

    > Why you need to use an Infrared filter for 'X Ray' effect ?
    >

    Or just go to your local camera store and order a Heliopan one. Probably
    less expensive as well.

    --
    To reply no_ HPMarketing Corp.
     
    Bob Salomon, Sep 4, 2004
    #2
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  3. yeo seng tong

    GregAddison Guest

    On Sat, 04 Sep 2004 05:12:16 -0400, Bob Salomon
    <> wrote:

    >In article <>,
    > yeo seng tong <> wrote:
    >
    >> Why you need to use an Infrared filter for 'X Ray' effect ?
    >>

    >Or just go to your local camera store and order a Heliopan one. Probably
    >less expensive as well.


    Even better, go to B&H and get this "Lee 3x3" #87 Infrared Polyester
    Filter" for only $13.95.

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=productlist&A=details&Q=&sku=102762&is=REG

    Cut out a disc of it the size of any old or inexpensive daylight or UV
    filter, and insert it in the filter holder. Disassemble an old UV or
    daylight filter and insert it behind the glass, then reassemble. It works
    great.

    If you need one larger than 73mm in dia. then get one of the 4"x4" Lee
    filters for $23.95, giving you IR filter sizes over 100mm. Have you ever
    purchased an IR filter over 72mm? Wow! The manufacturers must think
    everyone is as foolish as they are for charging those prices, and they're
    probably right.

    I use a filter made from this material and it works as well if not better
    than any of the other IR filters I've used. I made one out of curiosity to
    see if an inexpensive option would be a viable alternative. I'm glad I did.
    I use this <$15 filter all the time now and leave the expensive ones at
    home. I have no fear of damaging this one in the field, replacement cost is
    acceptable.

    I use it in conjunction with an inexpensive Hoya G [XI] (green wratten)
    filter to cut the excess I.R. in daylight. It brings bright sunlit scenes
    within range of Sony's crippled exposure settings. When the light levels
    are too low then removing this green filter starts a new range of exposure
    settings with about a 1-stop overlap between the 2 arrangements.

    (This info should put a nice dent in these scam-spam artists, as well as
    any other IR filter manufacturers, sometimes one in the same.)
     
    GregAddison, Sep 5, 2004
    #3
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