20D Viewfinder and Spot Metering

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Jimmy Pop, Oct 7, 2004.

  1. Jimmy Pop

    Jimmy Pop Guest

    Hello,

    I have only been into photography "seriously" for about 1.5 years. I
    currently have a Minolta 7i but am thinking of upgrading to the new
    Canon 20D. I have spent a lot of time reading all the 20D posts but I
    have a couple more questions I couldn't find direct answers to:

    1. It seems the viewfinder is stationary, meaning it can't be tilted
    up 90 degrees (or any other direction). Am I missing something here?
    This seems to be a pretty common feature on most cameras and one that
    I use quite a bit.

    2. Like I said, I am pretty new and just getting into metering and
    such. I live in the Eastern Sierras and spend a lot of time taking
    pictures of bright skies and darker foregrounds. How will not having
    the spot metering affect the use of graduated neutral density filters?
    Are there other techniques to use these filters as well?

    3. Overall, how is the Canon 20D as a landscape camera?

    Thank you very much for your help. I have learned a lot from this
    newsgroup!

    Jimmy Pop
    Jimmy Pop, Oct 7, 2004
    #1
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  2. Jimmy Pop

    Tony Guest

    The "viewfinder" does not tilt because it is not a viewfinder. The view is
    through the lens - that's what a reflex is all about. the screen on the back
    is for reviewing pictures already taken.
    I've never used a spotmeter to use grad filters so I don't see why anyone
    would need one. Since I've started doing my printing through photoshop, I've
    not used a grad filter at all - why have a straight line running across a
    print when you can filter for the exact horizon? Sometimes this involves
    combining two pictures, but can usuallly be done with simple mask and curves
    techniques.

    --
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com
    home of The Camera-ist's Manifesto
    The Improved Links Pages are at
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/links/mlinks00.html
    A sample chapter from "Haight-Ashbury" is at
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/writ/hait/hatitl.html

    "Jimmy Pop" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hello,
    >
    > I have only been into photography "seriously" for about 1.5 years. I
    > currently have a Minolta 7i but am thinking of upgrading to the new
    > Canon 20D. I have spent a lot of time reading all the 20D posts but I
    > have a couple more questions I couldn't find direct answers to:
    >
    > 1. It seems the viewfinder is stationary, meaning it can't be tilted
    > up 90 degrees (or any other direction). Am I missing something here?
    > This seems to be a pretty common feature on most cameras and one that
    > I use quite a bit.
    >
    > 2. Like I said, I am pretty new and just getting into metering and
    > such. I live in the Eastern Sierras and spend a lot of time taking
    > pictures of bright skies and darker foregrounds. How will not having
    > the spot metering affect the use of graduated neutral density filters?
    > Are there other techniques to use these filters as well?
    >
    > 3. Overall, how is the Canon 20D as a landscape camera?
    >
    > Thank you very much for your help. I have learned a lot from this
    > newsgroup!
    >
    > Jimmy Pop
    Tony, Oct 7, 2004
    #2
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  3. Jimmy Pop

    Chris Brown Guest

    In article <>,
    Jimmy Pop <> wrote:
    >
    >1. It seems the viewfinder is stationary, meaning it can't be tilted
    >up 90 degrees (or any other direction). Am I missing something here?


    Well, tilting the actual viewfinder would be somewhat interesting
    mechanically, since it relies on the reflex mirror and pentaprism delivering
    light in the right direction. Canon sell a clip-on angle-finder, however, if
    you really need the feature.

    [snip question about ND-grads - I've never tried them]

    >3. Overall, how is the Canon 20D as a landscape camera?


    As good as you're going to get from digital without spending stupid money.
    You'll get better results from wide-angle primes than zooms, if maximum
    detail and sharpness is your goal. The Canon 15mm fisheye lens makes a nice
    landscape lens. It's inexpensive, doesn't vignette, and can be used to
    produce either fisheye projection images, or rectilinear projection images
    via the use of "defishing" software, such as the facility included in
    Panotools.
    Chris Brown, Oct 7, 2004
    #3
  4. Jimmy Pop

    Skip M Guest

    "Jimmy Pop" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hello,
    >
    > I have only been into photography "seriously" for about 1.5 years. I
    > currently have a Minolta 7i but am thinking of upgrading to the new
    > Canon 20D. I have spent a lot of time reading all the 20D posts but I
    > have a couple more questions I couldn't find direct answers to:
    >
    > 1. It seems the viewfinder is stationary, meaning it can't be tilted
    > up 90 degrees (or any other direction). Am I missing something here?
    > This seems to be a pretty common feature on most cameras and one that
    > I use quite a bit.
    >
    > 2. Like I said, I am pretty new and just getting into metering and
    > such. I live in the Eastern Sierras and spend a lot of time taking
    > pictures of bright skies and darker foregrounds. How will not having
    > the spot metering affect the use of graduated neutral density filters?
    > Are there other techniques to use these filters as well?
    >
    > 3. Overall, how is the Canon 20D as a landscape camera?
    >
    > Thank you very much for your help. I have learned a lot from this
    > newsgroup!
    >
    > Jimmy Pop


    1) No DSLR has a tiltable viewfinder. There is an attachment that mounts on
    the viewfinder that serves that function. In fact, I've never seen a
    viewfinder that tilts on any camera. The back LCD, yes, but those don't
    tilt on DSLRs either. It is not the best way to shoot, compos, check
    exposure, or anything else.

    2) The 20D does not have a spot meter, it has a "partial spot," or 9.5% of
    the viewfinder image. Meter what you want exposed correctly, lock the
    exposure and shoot. Or remove the filter, meter, and then shoot.

    3) Until the 10-24 USM lens actually hits the market, any DSLR with a 1.6x
    crop factor is pretty limited as to landscapes. A 17mm gives you the same
    field of view as a 28mm, a 14mm the same as a 22.4mm, and these are the
    widest currently available for the 20D.

    --
    Skip Middleton
    http://www.shadowcatcherimagery.com
    Skip M, Oct 7, 2004
    #4
  5. "Skip M" <> wrote in message news:<HCj9d.1305$hj.79@fed1read07>...
    > news:...


    > 1) No DSLR has a tiltable viewfinder. There is an attachment that mounts on
    > the viewfinder that serves that function. In fact, I've never seen a
    > viewfinder that tilts on any camera. The back LCD, yes, but those don't
    > tilt on DSLRs either. It is not the best way to shoot, compos, check
    > exposure, or anything else.


    The Minolta 7i the original poster is refereing to (plus all relatives
    of it) has a tiltable viewfinder - which is extremely useful and at
    the minimum saves you the 150 USD investment, that e.g. Canon charges
    for its additional viewfinder dongle.

    We may argue about whether or not these super compacts are SLR... they
    are certainly TTL but maybe not SLR(eflex) due to the lack of a
    swinging mirror

    There is even a true DSLR with live feed on the display - not very
    useful, though, as it locks the mirror and only offers limited frame
    rates - not quite suitable for framing...

    > 3) Until the 10-24 USM lens actually hits the market, any DSLR with a 1.6x
    > crop factor is pretty limited as to landscapes. A 17mm gives you the same
    > field of view as a 28mm, a 14mm the same as a 22.4mm, and these are the
    > widest currently available for the 20D.


    well, there is a Sigma 12-24 HSM (USM) for Canon bodies that's been on
    the market for quite some time
    Bernhard Mayer, Oct 8, 2004
    #5
  6. Jimmy Pop

    Skip M Guest

    "Bernhard Mayer" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "Skip M" <> wrote in message
    > news:<HCj9d.1305$hj.79@fed1read07>...
    >> news:...

    >
    >> 1) No DSLR has a tiltable viewfinder. There is an attachment that mounts
    >> on
    >> the viewfinder that serves that function. In fact, I've never seen a
    >> viewfinder that tilts on any camera. The back LCD, yes, but those don't
    >> tilt on DSLRs either. It is not the best way to shoot, compos, check
    >> exposure, or anything else.

    >
    > The Minolta 7i the original poster is refereing to (plus all relatives
    > of it) has a tiltable viewfinder - which is extremely useful and at
    > the minimum saves you the 150 USD investment, that e.g. Canon charges
    > for its additional viewfinder dongle.
    >
    > We may argue about whether or not these super compacts are SLR... they
    > are certainly TTL but maybe not SLR(eflex) due to the lack of a
    > swinging mirror
    >
    > There is even a true DSLR with live feed on the display - not very
    > useful, though, as it locks the mirror and only offers limited frame
    > rates - not quite suitable for framing...
    >
    >> 3) Until the 10-24 USM lens actually hits the market, any DSLR with a
    >> 1.6x
    >> crop factor is pretty limited as to landscapes. A 17mm gives you the
    >> same
    >> field of view as a 28mm, a 14mm the same as a 22.4mm, and these are the
    >> widest currently available for the 20D.

    >
    > well, there is a Sigma 12-24 HSM (USM) for Canon bodies that's been on
    > the market for quite some time


    I stand corrected, but I didn't say they didn't exist, just that I hadn't
    seen them. That's my usual dodge, just in case someone has come up with
    something when I wasn't looking! <G>
    The DSLR that has live feeds, is it in production now? I've never heard of
    that in anything out there now, but I vaguely remember some mention of one
    that would be released in the near future.
    I remembered that lens just as I hit "send!" Ooops. I was thinking just in
    terms of Canon lenses, not aftermarket, and didn't go far enough afield.

    --
    Skip Middleton
    http://www.shadowcatcherimagery.com
    Skip M, Oct 9, 2004
    #6
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