200 Spam emails daliy

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Max, Jul 11, 2004.

  1. Max

    Max Guest

    In article <2q9Ic.294$>, Scottie
    <> wrote:

    > I am getting almost 200 Spam emails daily? I use Spamihiltor and this stops
    > most of it getting into Outlook Express, but it's still very annoying. I
    > have even stooped doing the online daily lottery trying to eliminate this
    > bombardment of emails.

    Well, let me answer this part first.
    Spammers don't throw out the lists all the time. If you had used your
    address with any service at least once, then they have it, and they
    will keep using it as long as they can.
    It doesn't matter if you stop visiting their page. It doesn't matter if
    you don't want it. It doesn't matter that you now use an edited
    address.

    > I just would like to know is there a way to stop
    > this,

    No. You have filters to sort through it, tools to sort through it, and
    services to sort through it. And you can delete that address and start
    a new one.
     
    Max, Jul 11, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Darren wrote:

    > Try using mailwasher then you can 'bounce' them back and it should stop
    > them.


    That won't help. They'll most likely either go to a spoofed address or an
    invalid address.

    --
    Blinky Linux Registered User 297263
     
    Blinky the Shark, Jul 11, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Max

    Scottie Guest

    I am getting almost 200 Spam emails daily? I use Spamihiltor and this stops
    most of it getting into Outlook Express, but it's still very annoying. I
    have even stooped doing the online daily lottery trying to eliminate this
    bombardment of emails. I just would like to know is there a way to stop
    this, and where in the hell do the spamers get your email in the first
    place, I use a munged address while on BBoards?
     
    Scottie, Jul 11, 2004
    #3
  4. Darren wrote:
    > Try using mailwasher then you can 'bounce' them back and it should
    > stop them.


    BWAGAGAGAGAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!
     
    Darren, the featherbrained, inuring flesh wound, Jul 11, 2004
    #4
  5. Max

    Darren Guest

    Try using mailwasher then you can 'bounce' them back and it should stop
    them.



    "Scottie" <> wrote in message
    news:2q9Ic.294$...
    > I am getting almost 200 Spam emails daily? I use Spamihiltor and this

    stops
    > most of it getting into Outlook Express, but it's still very annoying. I
    > have even stooped doing the online daily lottery trying to eliminate this
    > bombardment of emails. I just would like to know is there a way to stop
    > this, and where in the hell do the spamers get your email in the first
    > place, I use a munged address while on BBoards?
    >
    >
     
    Darren, Jul 11, 2004
    #5
  6. Darren wrote:
    > Try using mailwasher then you can 'bounce' them back and it should stop
    > them.


    Bullshit, you shouldn't use the bounce feature at all to deal with spam
    as the virtually every bit of spam comes from a forged or munged address.

    >
    >
    >
    > "Scottie" <> wrote in message
    > news:2q9Ic.294$...
    >
    >>I am getting almost 200 Spam emails daily? I use Spamihiltor and this

    >
    > stops
    >
    >>most of it getting into Outlook Express, but it's still very annoying. I
    >>have even stooped doing the online daily lottery trying to eliminate this
    >>bombardment of emails. I just would like to know is there a way to stop
    >>this, and where in the hell do the spamers get your email in the first
    >>place, I use a munged address while on BBoards?
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    >
     
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Brian_H=B9=A9?=, Jul 11, 2004
    #6
  7. Max

    kipper Guest

    I wish that I was only receiving 200 spam messages a day, as I am now
    receiving around 400 a day.


    "Scottie" <> wrote in message
    news:2q9Ic.294$...
    > I am getting almost 200 Spam emails daily? I use Spamihiltor and this

    stops
    > most of it getting into Outlook Express, but it's still very annoying. I
    > have even stooped doing the online daily lottery trying to eliminate this
    > bombardment of emails. I just would like to know is there a way to stop
    > this, and where in the hell do the spamers get your email in the first
    > place, I use a munged address while on BBoards?
    >
    >
     
    kipper, Jul 11, 2004
    #7
  8. Max

    Jerry G. Guest

    I was up to about 400+ per day! I did not want to change my addresses.

    I am now using an outside service to filter my emails before I get them.
    There are services, but they charge for them. It is better than using a
    local Spam filter in your machine, where all this crap has to be filtered
    through your machine, or read remotely to be able to filter it. The pay
    services are about 95% effective, which is a great help.

    The Spammers have softwares that scan the net searching for addresses. There
    are also address generator softwares that test all the address combinations
    that they can come up with. The working ones are then stored for use.

    On many occasions, I have started a new email address, and within a month,
    even if I never used that address, it started getting some Spam mail. I had
    one unused one that after a year, it was getting over 100 Spams a day. I
    never even used or gave away that address! I just made my father inlaw a
    new address. It is only several weeks old. He is now starting to get a few
    Spams on it.

    I just hope that MS, and whoever is in charge of all of this, will
    eventually be able to fix the problem. About 60% of the email on the system
    is Spam, and it has to be dealt with!



    --

    Jerry G.
    =====


    "Scottie" <> wrote in message
    news:2q9Ic.294$...
    I am getting almost 200 Spam emails daily? I use Spamihiltor and this stops
    most of it getting into Outlook Express, but it's still very annoying. I
    have even stooped doing the online daily lottery trying to eliminate this
    bombardment of emails. I just would like to know is there a way to stop
    this, and where in the hell do the spamers get your email in the first
    place, I use a munged address while on BBoards?
     
    Jerry G., Jul 11, 2004
    #8
  9. Max

    Zoab Guest

    "kipper" <> wrote in message
    news:EfaIc.258$...
    | I wish that I was only receiving 200 spam messages a day, as I am now
    | receiving around 400 a day.
    |
    |
    I was getting around 200 spam mails a day but my ISP ( Virgin ) now has
    spam filters and at the most, maybe 3 or 4 slip though. Makes me wonder, if
    one ISP can do it, why can't they all. As for Mailwasher, that was a
    complete waste of time to me, I still had to delete all the spam.

    Bryan
     
    Zoab, Jul 11, 2004
    #9
  10. I changed my email address.
    The address was
    I simple changed the dot to underscore and the spam stopped.
    I understand that using underscore can stop harvesting of emails by
    spammers.



    "Brian H¹©" <> wrote in message
    news:j3aIc.128$...
    > Darren wrote:
    > > Try using mailwasher then you can 'bounce' them back and it should stop
    > > them.

    >
    > Bullshit, you shouldn't use the bounce feature at all to deal with spam
    > as the virtually every bit of spam comes from a forged or munged address.
    >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > "Scottie" <> wrote in message
    > > news:2q9Ic.294$...
    > >
    > >>I am getting almost 200 Spam emails daily? I use Spamihiltor and this

    > >
    > > stops
    > >
    > >>most of it getting into Outlook Express, but it's still very annoying. I
    > >>have even stooped doing the online daily lottery trying to eliminate

    this
    > >>bombardment of emails. I just would like to know is there a way to stop
    > >>this, and where in the hell do the spamers get your email in the first
    > >>place, I use a munged address while on BBoards?
    > >>
    > >>

    > >
    > >
    > >
     
    not hereplease@not here.com, Jul 11, 2004
    #10
  11. Max

    Scottie Guest

    Thanks everyone for the advice. Another thing I was wondering about was, why
    do spamers send spam? I don't know anyone that would buy or use a service
    that was from a spam source, so why do they send it in the first place? Of
    course some contain viruses but those people depraved.
    =======
    "Scottie" <> wrote in message
    news:2q9Ic.294$...
    > I am getting almost 200 Spam emails daily? I use Spamihiltor and this

    stops
    > most of it getting into Outlook Express, but it's still very annoying. I
    > have even stooped doing the online daily lottery trying to eliminate this
    > bombardment of emails. I just would like to know is there a way to stop
    > this, and where in the hell do the spamers get your email in the first
    > place, I use a munged address while on BBoards?
    >
    >
     
    Scottie, Jul 11, 2004
    #11
  12. Max

    geopelia Guest

    "Scottie" <> wrote in message
    news:xLcIc.323$...
    > Thanks everyone for the advice. Another thing I was wondering about was,

    why
    > do spamers send spam? I don't know anyone that would buy or use a service
    > that was from a spam source, so why do they send it in the first place? Of
    > course some contain viruses but those people depraved.
    > =======
    > "Scottie" <> wrote in message
    > news:2q9Ic.294$...
    > > I am getting almost 200 Spam emails daily? I use Spamihiltor and this

    > stops
    > > most of it getting into Outlook Express, but it's still very annoying. I
    > > have even stooped doing the online daily lottery trying to eliminate

    this
    > > bombardment of emails. I just would like to know is there a way to stop
    > > this, and where in the hell do the spamers get your email in the first
    > > place, I use a munged address while on BBoards?
    > >
    > >

    If you are in New Zealand, you can use xtra.co.nz. (I'm not sure though if
    you have to be a Telecom customer.)
    xtra will put all the spam into a separate file,where you can either check
    it and delete it, or delete it unread. I get about 100 a day in my spam box,
    but very few in my Inbox. Other countries may have something similar.
    Geopelia
    >
     
    geopelia, Jul 12, 2004
    #12
  13. Max

    Max Guest

    In article <fE9Ic.250$>, Darren
    <> wrote:

    > Try using mailwasher then you can 'bounce' them back and it should stop
    > them.


    Bad idea.
    Spammers don't generally use valid e-mail addresses, at least not their
    own addresses, and they certainly wouldn't sort or read the bounced
    replies.
    Even if they did use an address for a whole day, or somehow receive a
    bounce, they aren't going to go to any effort to remove your address
    just because it bounced.

    In short, that really can't help and it most definitely will hurt the
    issue.
     
    Max, Jul 12, 2004
    #13
  14. Believe it or not many people order products like viagra and penal
    enlargement pills from these spammer adds
    in a news report i read that the guy with herbal viagra made 6million
    dollars last year!!!

    Crazy ...you bet

    Anthony



    "Scottie" <> wrote in message
    news:xLcIc.323$...
    > Thanks everyone for the advice. Another thing I was wondering about was,

    why
    > do spamers send spam? I don't know anyone that would buy or use a service
    > that was from a spam source, so why do they send it in the first place? Of
    > course some contain viruses but those people depraved.
    > =======
    > "Scottie" <> wrote in message
    > news:2q9Ic.294$...
    > > I am getting almost 200 Spam emails daily? I use Spamihiltor and this

    > stops
    > > most of it getting into Outlook Express, but it's still very annoying. I
    > > have even stooped doing the online daily lottery trying to eliminate

    this
    > > bombardment of emails. I just would like to know is there a way to stop
    > > this, and where in the hell do the spamers get your email in the first
    > > place, I use a munged address while on BBoards?
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    anthony jodoin, Jul 18, 2004
    #14
  15. "anthony jodoin" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Believe it or not many people order products like viagra and penal
    > enlargement pills from these spammer adds
    > in a news report i read that the guy with herbal viagra made 6million
    > dollars last year!!!



    Think of it this way...it costs the spammer nothing to send a million spam
    mails out (except maybe the price of a $10 hosting account...if even that).
    Imagine if just 1% of the people who received those spam mails purchased a
    $5 spamvertised product. That's a HUGE return on the spammer's investment.
    Spamming is a problem because, unfortunately, it works.

    --Tina
    --
    FREE: Web hosting accounts
    HOSTING: Cpanel, Multi-domains, Resellers
    SERVERS: Dedicated, Colocation, Managed
    http://www.affordablehost.com , serving the web since 1997





    --
    FREE: Web hosting accounts
    HOSTING: Cpanel, Multi-domains, Resellers
    SERVERS: Dedicated, Colocation, Managed
    http://www.affordablehost.com , serving the web since 1997
     
    Tina - AffordableHOST, Inc., Jul 18, 2004
    #15
  16. Max

    t gilb Guest

    Re: 200 Spam emails daliy/long reply

    "Tina - AffordableHOST, Inc." <> wrote in message
    news:...
    | "anthony jodoin" <> wrote in message
    | news:...
    | > Believe it or not many people order products like viagra and penal
    | > enlargement pills from these spammer adds
    | > in a news report i read that the guy with herbal viagra made 6million
    | > dollars last year!!!
    |
    |
    | Think of it this way...it costs the spammer nothing to send a million spam
    | mails out (except maybe the price of a $10 hosting account...if even
    that).
    | Imagine if just 1% of the people who received those spam mails purchased a
    | $5 spamvertised product. That's a HUGE return on the spammer's
    investment.
    | Spamming is a problem because, unfortunately, it works.
    |
    | --Tina
    | --
    | FREE: Web hosting accounts
    | HOSTING: Cpanel, Multi-domains, Resellers
    | SERVERS: Dedicated, Colocation, Managed
    | http://www.affordablehost.com , serving the web since 1997
    |
    |
    |
    |
    |
    | --
    | FREE: Web hosting accounts
    | HOSTING: Cpanel, Multi-domains, Resellers
    | SERVERS: Dedicated, Colocation, Managed
    | http://www.affordablehost.com , serving the web since 1997
    |

    22-year-old thrives in world of spam
    Law fails to stop flood of e-mails

    By Howard Witt, Tribune senior correspondent. Tribune senior correspondent
    John Crewdson contributed to this report
    Published July 18, 2004

    AUSTIN, Texas -- For a young man who has repeatedly reached into the
    personal e-mail boxes of uncountable numbers of Americans, Ryan Pitylak is
    awfully bashful. His name never appears as the sender in any of these
    e-mails, and he has taken great pains to set up hundreds of shell companies,
    with anodyne names such as Federated Continuum, Northern Alternative and
    Visionary Advanced, that conceal his true identity.

    But if you've recently received a customized e-mail offer to refinance your
    mortgage, buy health insurance, install a burglar alarm or extend your auto
    warranty, Pitylak is one of the people seeking your acquaintance. And if you
    responded to any of the offers he sent, you instantly made him wealthier:
    His companies earn up to $7 for every reply.

    A Tribune inquiry based on hundreds of documents, visits to scores of
    Internet sites and more than two dozen interviews reveals that Pitylak is
    one of the nation's most prodigious manufacturers of unsolicited commercial
    e-mail, more commonly known as spam. And it sheds new light on the murky
    legal context in which spammers are able to operate.

    Pitylak refused repeated opportunities to respond to this report. But public
    records indicate that, for a 22-year-old college student, he is doing very
    well. He owns a modern ranch-style house, valued for tax purposes at
    $450,000, in one of Austin's nicest neighborhoods, and he has a late-model
    Jaguar parked in the driveway.

    By day, Pitylak attends the University of Texas, where he is an
    undergraduate majoring in advertising. But his e-mail activities outside the
    classroom have earned him a listing on the Spamhaus Project, a Web site that
    tracks the biggest spammers worldwide, and have attracted the scrutiny of
    the Texas attorney general's office.

    Annoying and costly

    Spammers are proliferating in spite of a new federal anti-spam law--the
    Controlling the Assault of Non-Solicited Pornography and Marketing, or
    CAN-SPAM, Act, which was supposed to slow the torrent of unwanted e-mails.
    Instead, spam now accounts for 85 percent of all e-mail traffic, by some
    industry estimates.

    Beyond their mounting annoyance, spam messages are thought to cost U.S.
    businesses nearly $2,000 per employee in wasted productivity each year,
    according to an analysis by Nucleus Research, a Massachusetts technology
    research firm.

    Moreover, compliance with the CAN-SPAM Act has dwindled to just 1 percent,
    according to a study of a quarter-million e-mail messages by MX Logic Inc.,
    a software company that produces spam-blocking programs.

    Among other provisions, the law bars senders of commercial e-mail from using
    fictitious identities and requires them to provide ways for recipients to
    remove themselves from mailing lists.

    "We're seeing that the majority of those who send unsolicited e-mail could
    care less about CAN-SPAM," said Scott Chasin, chief technology officer at MX
    Logic. "Spammers didn't obey the laws we had before. Why do we think they
    would obey any kind of successors to them?"

    The Federal Trade Commission has brought a handful of enforcement cases
    against spammers since the law took effect Jan. 1. In the only state
    prosecution under the law so far, the Massachusetts attorney general
    announced a lawsuit against a spammer on July 1. But in a sign of the
    complexity of such cases, prosecutors are still trying to locate the elusive
    defendant, who lives in Florida, to serve him with legal papers.

    Setbacks in battle

    The fight against spam has suffered other recent blows. The FTC threw up its
    hands last month and decided that trying to build a national do-not-spam
    registry, similar to the do-not-call list used to ward off telemarketers,
    would be technologically impractical and might actually assist the spammers
    in locating e-mail addresses.

    Meanwhile, Internet giants including America Online, Microsoft and Yahoo
    announced in mid-June that they are preparing to deploy new technologies
    they hope will stay one step ahead of the spammers, such as a method to
    verify the authenticity of the sender of an e-mail--a feature the Internet
    so far lacks.

    Not 24 hours after that announcement, America Online revealed a staggering
    security breach as federal prosecutors said they had arrested a software
    engineer accused of stealing 92 million customer screen names that were then
    sold to spammers.

    "It's a frustrating battle at times, but everyone has to fight it," conceded
    Paula Selis, senior counsel in the office of the Washington state attorney
    general and co-chairwoman of the FTC's anti-spam task force.

    "This is all about cost," Selis said. "As long as it's still cheaper for
    spammers to take the risk of drawing a lawsuit, and that risk is fairly low,
    they will continue to send spam. When the balance gets shifted, when there's
    enough enforcement action, when there are financial consequences, then I
    think we will see the amount of spam drop off."

    For now, though, that balance is clearly in Pitylak's favor.

    Pitylak, who declined repeated requests to be interviewed for this story
    that were delivered in person, by phone and through e-mail, referred
    questions to his lawyer but then declined to provide a name or contact
    information for an attorney.

    But the Internet, the same tool that Pitylak has exploited to build his
    e-mail business, also allows analysts to piece together how a typical
    spammer can operate in the shadow of the CAN-SPAM Act and law-enforcement
    scrutiny.

    Early start

    Pitylak was only 14 and living in Ann Arbor, Mich., when, in early 1997 he
    created what appears to have been his first Internet marketing scheme,
    according to the results of a Google search. Pitylak's e-mail pitch, for a
    company he called Gates Computer Systems, offered advertisers the chance to
    buy ads on a Web site for $79 per month.

    By 2002, Pitylak had expanded his business: That year, anti-spam watchdog
    groups began tracing Pitylak's name attached to the registrations for
    numerous Internet sites responsible for distributing volumes of spam
    marketing offers.

    With a partner, Mark Trotter, Pitylak set up a company called PayPerAction
    LLC and, under that umbrella name, registered more than 200 other aliases
    for the company with the Texas secretary of state.

    The companies, with names such as National Insurance Exchange, Freedom Quote
    and Mortgage Rate Network, typically offer e-mail recipients "5 Free Health
    Insurance Quotes" or "Incredible 3.51% Mortgage Rates" or "Home Invasion
    Protection." Clicking on the link contained in a message produces a form
    asking for personal information such as name, address and household income.

    Completed forms, in turn, are sold to agents of legitimate companies, such
    as IndyMac Bank, ADT Security and MEGA Life and Health Insurance. The agents
    say they pay $3 to $7 for each referral.

    That may not sound like much, but the economics of spam make the potential
    payback highly lucrative.

    Potential for earnings

    It is not known how many e-mails Pitylak's companies have generated, but
    experts say the typical spammer sends out millions of messages each month,
    to addresses purchased from e-mail marketing firms or simply culled by
    computer "spiders" from public Internet sites, forums and chat rooms.

    The majority of spam recipients delete unsolicited emails without ever
    opening them, as computer security experts advise. But a recent survey on
    Internet usage by the Pew Internet & American Life Project found that 3
    percent of e-mail users said they had not only responded to unsolicited
    e-mail offers but provided personal information as well.

    Therefore, if a spammer sent 1million e-mail offers in a month and received
    30,000 replies, he or she could earn $90,000 to $210,000.

    Companies that buy the consumer information generated from Pitylak's spam
    are unapologetic about a practice that vast numbers of consumers consider a
    nuisance.

    "I just buy them from the lead companies," said Kathy Mobley, regional
    director for MEGA Life and Health, based in North Richland Hills, Texas. "I
    don't know how they get them. And I don't care. As independent contractors,
    we can market our business however we want to by legal means."

    Yet the legality of the spammers' activities is increasingly being called
    into question.

    Pitylak's PayPerAction and its alias companies are registered with the Texas
    secretary of state in the small, central Texas town of Kerrville. But the
    address turns out to be a firm called National Registered Agents, which
    describes itself as a "document forwarding agency" for some 8,000 companies.

    Another address listed for the company, on 6th Street near downtown Austin,
    has a PayPerAction sign on the door but stands empty, with dust caked on the
    few chairs and boxes visible inside.

    Yet another address on North Mopac Highway in Austin, which is contained in
    the fine print of many of the e-mail solicitations sent out by Pitylak's
    companies, is also an empty office, according to neighboring business
    tenants in the building. Pitylak began leasing it on Jan. 1, the day the
    CAN-SPAM Act took effect, and has kept current with the rent, according to
    Jeff Henley, the leasing agent for the building.

    One of the law's four main provisions includes a requirement that senders of
    commercial e-mail include a valid physical postal address on their messages.

    Using a fake business address was what allegedly tripped up William Carson,
    the Florida spammer sued earlier this month by the Massachusetts attorney
    general. Carson, who sent out e-mail offers touting low-interest mortgages,
    used a real Newton, Mass., office building as a return address, but he did
    not lease an office there, according to Jack Christin, an assistant attorney
    general.

    "We think his messages are misleading in both form and substance," Christin
    said. "People got the idea that the Internet is the Wild West, this other
    way of doing business, but we don't believe that's the case. You have to
    live up to these basic requirements" of the CAN-SPAM Act.

    Whether leasing an empty office for the purpose of maintaining a postal box
    satisfies the anti-spam law is uncertain, according to legal experts. But
    Pitylak's approach has attracted the interest of the Texas attorney
    general's office. An investigator from the consumer protection division
    asked to review Pitylak's office lease several months ago, said Henley, the
    leasing agent.

    A spokesman for the attorney general declined to comment on the status of
    any investigation.

    What the law requires

    Some of Pitylak's e-mails might not comply with other provisions of the
    CAN-SPAM Act. The law requires, for example, that spammers accurately
    identify the senders of their e-mails. But none of the purported senders of
    nearly two dozen selected e-mails sent by Pitylak's companies in
    June--senders with names such as "Dennis Carlson," "Jared Harvey" and
    "Rebecca Ross"--replied to requests to verify that they existed.

    The law also requires that spam e-mails contain a link that recipients can
    click on to remove themselves from future mailings. Some of Pitylak's
    e-mails contain such a link, and clicking on it did appear to halt the flow
    of messages from particular companies. However, in some other e-mails, the
    link led to a "file not found" page.

    Although the FTC has so far brought only two actions against spammers for
    violations of the CAN-SPAM Act--and both cases involved consumer fraud as
    well as e-mail deception--the agency is preparing more cases, said Katie
    Harrington-McBride, a staff attorney.

    But, Harrington-McBride noted, the law was never intended as a cure-all for
    the problem of spam.

    "The act itself does not specifically prohibit the sending of volume
    e-mail," she said. "Instead, it requires that anyone using this channel
    comply with a series of disclosure requirements and avoid misleading
    consumers.

    "But it is certainly possible that a person can send a large amount of
    e-mail without running afoul of the act."
     
    t gilb, Jul 18, 2004
    #16
  17. Max

    Toolman Tim Guest

    "Tina - AffordableHOST, Inc." <> wrote in
    message news:
    >| "anthony jodoin" <> wrote in message
    >| news:...
    >| > Believe it or not many people order products like viagra and penal
    >| > enlargement pills from these spammer adds
    >| > in a news report i read that the guy with herbal viagra made
    >| > 6million dollars last year!!!
    >|
    >|
    >| Think of it this way...it costs the spammer nothing to send a
    >| million spam mails out (except maybe the price of a $10 hosting
    >| account...if even that). Imagine if just 1% of the people who
    >| received those spam mails purchased a $5 spamvertised product.
    >| That's a HUGE return on the spammer's investment. Spamming is a
    >| problem because, unfortunately, it works.
    >|


    Exactly. But it doesn't work here - I don't buy *anything* that someone
    pitches to me. If I'm not looking for it, I don't need it! Plus, why would I
    *ever* open an email with the subject line "Are you satisfied with your
    breast size?" heh heh...

    --
    "If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die, I want to go where
    THEY went." ~Will Rogers~
     
    Toolman Tim, Jul 18, 2004
    #17
  18. Max

    Mike245 Guest

    I have had the same hotmail account for years (i have POP3 adapter for
    it). Your friend is thunderbird. Its an email client (a lot like
    Outlook express) except with an excellent spam filter. In fact, you can
    activate a "trainable" spam filter instead of the default settings.
    Works great for me, with extremely rare false positives.

    I only get 50 or so spam messages a day (at most) but I never see them.

    http://www.mozilla.org/products/thunderbird/


    --
    Mike
    Block Banner Ads Now
    http://everythingisnt.com/hosts.html
     
    Mike245, Jul 18, 2004
    #18
  19. Max

    Toolman Tim Guest

    Re: 200 Spam emails daliy/long reply

    "t gilb" <> wrote in message
    news:EtCKc.3323$
    >| "Tina - AffordableHOST, Inc." <> wrote in
    >| message news:...
    >| | "anthony jodoin" <> wrote in message
    >| | news:...
    >| | > Believe it or not many people order products like viagra and
    >| | > penal enlargement pills from these spammer adds
    >| | > in a news report i read that the guy with herbal viagra made
    >| | > 6million dollars last year!!!
    >| |
    >| |
    >| | Think of it this way...it costs the spammer nothing to send a
    >| | million spam mails out (except maybe the price of a $10 hosting
    >| | account...if even
    >| that).
    >| | Imagine if just 1% of the people who received those spam mails
    >| | purchased a $5 spamvertised product. That's a HUGE return on the
    >| | spammer's
    >| investment.
    >| | Spamming is a problem because, unfortunately, it works.
    >| |
    >| | --Tina
    >| |
    >|
    >| 22-year-old thrives in world of spam
    >| Law fails to stop flood of e-mails
    >|
    >| By Howard Witt, Tribune senior correspondent. Tribune senior
    >| correspondent John Crewdson contributed to this report
    >| Published July 18, 2004
    >|
    >| <<clipped>>


    Great article - but please, next time just post a web link ;o)

    --
    "If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die, I want to go where
    THEY went." ~Will Rogers~
     
    Toolman Tim, Jul 18, 2004
    #19
  20. Max

    t gilb Guest

    Re: 200 Spam emails daliy/long reply

    "Toolman Tim" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    | "t gilb" <> wrote in message
    | news:EtCKc.3323$
    | >| "Tina - AffordableHOST, Inc." <> wrote in
    | >| message news:...
    | >| | "anthony jodoin" <> wrote in message
    | >| | news:...
    | >| | > Believe it or not many people order products like viagra and
    | >| | > penal enlargement pills from these spammer adds
    | >| | > in a news report i read that the guy with herbal viagra made
    | >| | > 6million dollars last year!!!
    | >| |
    | >| |
    | >| | Think of it this way...it costs the spammer nothing to send a
    | >| | million spam mails out (except maybe the price of a $10 hosting
    | >| | account...if even
    | >| that).
    | >| | Imagine if just 1% of the people who received those spam mails
    | >| | purchased a $5 spamvertised product. That's a HUGE return on the
    | >| | spammer's
    | >| investment.
    | >| | Spamming is a problem because, unfortunately, it works.
    | >| |
    | >| | --Tina
    | >| |
    | >|
    | >| 22-year-old thrives in world of spam
    | >| Law fails to stop flood of e-mails
    | >|
    | >| By Howard Witt, Tribune senior correspondent. Tribune senior
    | >| correspondent John Crewdson contributed to this report
    | >| Published July 18, 2004
    | >|
    | >| <<clipped>>
    |
    | Great article - but please, next time just post a web link ;o)
    |
    | --
    | "If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die, I want to go where
    | THEY went." ~Will Rogers~
    |
    Couldn't, you need to be a subscriber.
     
    t gilb, Jul 18, 2004
    #20
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