20 Gig maximum for C Drive: Is this enough?

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by JB, Apr 10, 2006.

  1. JB

    JB Guest

    I have been looking at a Sony Vaio laptop computer, but I see that the 60
    gig drive has been partitioned into 20 gig for C Drive and 40 gig for D
    drive. Even with the 80 gig model, C Drive is still limited to 20 gig. With
    Windows taking more than 2 gig, I wondered whether you consider that a
    maximum of 20 gig for C Drive is enough for Windows, and lots of future
    programs? Is there any benefit in partitioning a laptop hard drive like
    this? Thanks for your thoughts on this.
     
    JB, Apr 10, 2006
    #1
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  2. JB

    Dave Doe Guest

    In article <>, says...
    > I have been looking at a Sony Vaio laptop computer, but I see that the 60
    > gig drive has been partitioned into 20 gig for C Drive and 40 gig for D
    > drive. Even with the 80 gig model, C Drive is still limited to 20 gig. With
    > Windows taking more than 2 gig, I wondered whether you consider that a
    > maximum of 20 gig for C Drive is enough for Windows, and lots of future
    > programs? Is there any benefit in partitioning a laptop hard drive like
    > this? Thanks for your thoughts on this.


    Well I'd like someone to correct me if I'm wrong - but I fail to see the
    point in partitioning a drive for 'speed'. ie as is so often typically
    seen, a small partition is created for the swap file (short of it being
    on *another* (physical) hard disk drive, I just don't see the point).

    So I think that, at the end of the day, extra partitions just waste
    space (albeit not much).

    re setup per OP - I don't see the point in that either. It just limits
    you to be forced (eventually anyway) to change the default install
    location for s/w from c:\<pf>\<vendor> - to d:...

    Given the 80Gb drive - if it were me, I'd use one partition only.

    --
    Duncan
     
    Dave Doe, Apr 10, 2006
    #2
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  3. JB

    ~misfit~ Guest

    JB wrote:
    > I have been looking at a Sony Vaio laptop computer, but I see that
    > the 60 gig drive has been partitioned into 20 gig for C Drive and 40
    > gig for D drive. Even with the 80 gig model, C Drive is still limited
    > to 20 gig. With Windows taking more than 2 gig, I wondered whether
    > you consider that a maximum of 20 gig for C Drive is enough for
    > Windows, and lots of future programs? Is there any benefit in
    > partitioning a laptop hard drive like this? Thanks for your thoughts
    > on this.


    There is nothing stopping you installing future programs to D:. I have a
    200GB HDD and I have 10GB for Windows and "core" apps, 15GB for programs and
    the rest for data.

    10GB is plenty for Windows (With fixed swapfile of whatever size you want to
    make it, mine's 1.5GB) and core apps and, for me, 15BG is plenty for
    programs. Mostly games.

    I look at it this way, I can always take an image of C: drive periodically
    and put it on E: so I can restore from it with a bootable CD (Norton Ghost)
    and 15GB is fine for programs. (They can always be re-sized with
    Partitionmagic anyway).

    All my XviDs, pics and data files go on E:. There are several reasons for
    this set up. The main one is C: is at the front of the drive and is
    therefore the fastest part of the drive meaning Windows loads faster.
    Keeping it small also means I can back it up easilly in case of something
    going wrong. Programs next in the next-fastest part of the drive. Finally
    all my data files on E:. This way, derfagging the two "active" partitions
    doesn't take long at all and the system remains responsive. (Before I
    started this practice I had to re-install regularly as the OS got spread all
    over the HDD causing a lot of HDD trashing and slowing down). So, defragging
    C: and D: is quick and easy, no big XviD files and the like to have to be
    moved around. E: doesn't need defagging often at all as it's not constantly
    being written to and speed isn't so important here anyway.

    I'd much rather go with the two partition system you have, than a single big
    partition. It's not long before systems on one big partition get sluggish.
    You don't want all your data files getting mixed in with the OS files and
    taking up the faster parts of the drive. Two is nearly as good as three, the
    main reason I went for three is C: is smaller, therefore easier to back up
    (Programs can be reinstalled and "personalised" easier than the OS can). If
    20GB *does* become too small then you can always re-size it if the rest of
    the drive isn't full. I think 20GB would be fine, if I didn't have some
    games that require 3GB each I wouldn't have made my programs partition so
    big.

    Cheers,
    --
    ~Shaun~
     
    ~misfit~, Apr 10, 2006
    #3
  4. JB

    Dave Taylor Guest

    "JB" <> wrote in news::

    > Thanks for your thoughts on this.


    Sony have a restore routine that blows away C: but leaves D: if you want.
    That is why it is split for you.

    Resize it if you want, but this is a good thing.
    If you RTFM, you will find that there are recommendations about this and
    suggestions on where to place your data.

    --
    Ciao, Dave
     
    Dave Taylor, Apr 10, 2006
    #4
  5. JB

    JB Guest

    "~misfit~" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > JB wrote:
    >> I have been looking at a Sony Vaio laptop computer, but I see that
    >> the 60 gig drive has been partitioned into 20 gig for C Drive and 40
    >> gig for D drive. Even with the 80 gig model, C Drive is still limited
    >> to 20 gig. With Windows taking more than 2 gig, I wondered whether
    >> you consider that a maximum of 20 gig for C Drive is enough for
    >> Windows, and lots of future programs? Is there any benefit in
    >> partitioning a laptop hard drive like this? Thanks for your thoughts
    >> on this.

    >
    > There is nothing stopping you installing future programs to D:. I have a
    > 200GB HDD and I have 10GB for Windows and "core" apps, 15GB for programs
    > and the rest for data.
    >
    > 10GB is plenty for Windows (With fixed swapfile of whatever size you want
    > to make it, mine's 1.5GB) and core apps and, for me, 15BG is plenty for
    > programs. Mostly games.
    >
    > I look at it this way, I can always take an image of C: drive periodically
    > and put it on E: so I can restore from it with a bootable CD (Norton
    > Ghost) and 15GB is fine for programs. (They can always be re-sized with
    > Partitionmagic anyway).
    >
    > All my XviDs, pics and data files go on E:. There are several reasons for
    > this set up. The main one is C: is at the front of the drive and is
    > therefore the fastest part of the drive meaning Windows loads faster.
    > Keeping it small also means I can back it up easilly in case of something
    > going wrong. Programs next in the next-fastest part of the drive. Finally
    > all my data files on E:. This way, derfagging the two "active" partitions
    > doesn't take long at all and the system remains responsive. (Before I
    > started this practice I had to re-install regularly as the OS got spread
    > all over the HDD causing a lot of HDD trashing and slowing down). So,
    > defragging C: and D: is quick and easy, no big XviD files and the like to
    > have to be moved around. E: doesn't need defagging often at all as it's
    > not constantly being written to and speed isn't so important here anyway.
    >
    > I'd much rather go with the two partition system you have, than a single
    > big partition. It's not long before systems on one big partition get
    > sluggish. You don't want all your data files getting mixed in with the OS
    > files and taking up the faster parts of the drive. Two is nearly as good
    > as three, the main reason I went for three is C: is smaller, therefore
    > easier to back up (Programs can be reinstalled and "personalised" easier
    > than the OS can). If 20GB *does* become too small then you can always
    > re-size it if the rest of the drive isn't full. I think 20GB would be
    > fine, if I didn't have some games that require 3GB each I wouldn't have
    > made my programs partition so big.
    >
    > Cheers,
    > --
    > ~Shaun~

    Thanks very much Shaun for your reply, most interesting. After talking with
    one or two people, I gained the impression that it was quite difficult to
    increase the size of C Drive at a later date (given that there is plenty of
    space left on the rest of the drive). Is there a program that could do this
    without upsetting any of the programs or data already on the disk?

    Regards, JB
     
    JB, Apr 10, 2006
    #5
  6. 20 gig is a lot for the C: drive if you keep ALL of your data on D:

    My desktop has 79 MAJOR applications installed (office and lots of
    multimedia including multiple video editing programs), and the C: drive
    is only 18 gigabytes and it's only 2/3 full (on a 320 gigabyte hard
    drive). [All programs are installed on C:) But I moved "My Documents"
    to D:, and I keep ALL of my data, including E-Mail and my browser files,
    on drives other than C: (I have drives up to H:). So it's not a problem
    ***IF*** you only keep programs on C:.

    However, in any case, you can always use Partition Magic to resize
    partitions or shift space between C: and D: (without having to move or
    reinstall anything).



    JB wrote:
    > I have been looking at a Sony Vaio laptop computer, but I see that the 60
    > gig drive has been partitioned into 20 gig for C Drive and 40 gig for D
    > drive. Even with the 80 gig model, C Drive is still limited to 20 gig. With
    > Windows taking more than 2 gig, I wondered whether you consider that a
    > maximum of 20 gig for C Drive is enough for Windows, and lots of future
    > programs? Is there any benefit in partitioning a laptop hard drive like
    > this? Thanks for your thoughts on this.
    >
    >
     
    Barry Watzman, Apr 10, 2006
    #6
  7. JB

    Jerry Guest

    JB wrote:
    > "~misfit~" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >>JB wrote:
    >>
    >>>I have been looking at a Sony Vaio laptop computer, but I see that
    >>>the 60 gig drive has been partitioned into 20 gig for C Drive and 40
    >>>gig for D drive. Even with the 80 gig model, C Drive is still limited
    >>>to 20 gig. With Windows taking more than 2 gig, I wondered whether
    >>>you consider that a maximum of 20 gig for C Drive is enough for
    >>>Windows, and lots of future programs? Is there any benefit in
    >>>partitioning a laptop hard drive like this? Thanks for your thoughts
    >>>on this.

    >>
    >>There is nothing stopping you installing future programs to D:. I have a
    >>200GB HDD and I have 10GB for Windows and "core" apps, 15GB for programs
    >>and the rest for data.
    >>
    >>10GB is plenty for Windows (With fixed swapfile of whatever size you want
    >>to make it, mine's 1.5GB) and core apps and, for me, 15BG is plenty for
    >>programs. Mostly games.
    >>
    >>I look at it this way, I can always take an image of C: drive periodically
    >>and put it on E: so I can restore from it with a bootable CD (Norton
    >>Ghost) and 15GB is fine for programs. (They can always be re-sized with
    >>Partitionmagic anyway).
    >>
    >>All my XviDs, pics and data files go on E:. There are several reasons for
    >>this set up. The main one is C: is at the front of the drive and is
    >>therefore the fastest part of the drive meaning Windows loads faster.
    >>Keeping it small also means I can back it up easilly in case of something
    >>going wrong. Programs next in the next-fastest part of the drive. Finally
    >>all my data files on E:. This way, derfagging the two "active" partitions
    >>doesn't take long at all and the system remains responsive. (Before I
    >>started this practice I had to re-install regularly as the OS got spread
    >>all over the HDD causing a lot of HDD trashing and slowing down). So,
    >>defragging C: and D: is quick and easy, no big XviD files and the like to
    >>have to be moved around. E: doesn't need defagging often at all as it's
    >>not constantly being written to and speed isn't so important here anyway.
    >>
    >>I'd much rather go with the two partition system you have, than a single
    >>big partition. It's not long before systems on one big partition get
    >>sluggish. You don't want all your data files getting mixed in with the OS
    >>files and taking up the faster parts of the drive. Two is nearly as good
    >>as three, the main reason I went for three is C: is smaller, therefore
    >>easier to back up (Programs can be reinstalled and "personalised" easier
    >>than the OS can). If 20GB *does* become too small then you can always
    >>re-size it if the rest of the drive isn't full. I think 20GB would be
    >>fine, if I didn't have some games that require 3GB each I wouldn't have
    >>made my programs partition so big.
    >>
    >>Cheers,
    >>--
    >>~Shaun~

    >
    > Thanks very much Shaun for your reply, most interesting. After talking with
    > one or two people, I gained the impression that it was quite difficult to
    > increase the size of C Drive at a later date (given that there is plenty of
    > space left on the rest of the drive). Is there a program that could do this
    > without upsetting any of the programs or data already on the disk?


    Partition magic will do it just fine. I wouldn't be without it.
     
    Jerry, Apr 10, 2006
    #7
  8. JB

    ~misfit~ Guest

    JB wrote:
    > "~misfit~" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> JB wrote:
    >>> I have been looking at a Sony Vaio laptop computer, but I see that
    >>> the 60 gig drive has been partitioned into 20 gig for C Drive and 40
    >>> gig for D drive. Even with the 80 gig model, C Drive is still
    >>> limited to 20 gig. With Windows taking more than 2 gig, I wondered
    >>> whether you consider that a maximum of 20 gig for C Drive is enough
    >>> for Windows, and lots of future programs? Is there any benefit in
    >>> partitioning a laptop hard drive like this? Thanks for your thoughts
    >>> on this.

    >>
    >> There is nothing stopping you installing future programs to D:. I
    >> have a 200GB HDD and I have 10GB for Windows and "core" apps, 15GB
    >> for programs and the rest for data.
    >>
    >> 10GB is plenty for Windows (With fixed swapfile of whatever size you
    >> want to make it, mine's 1.5GB) and core apps and, for me, 15BG is
    >> plenty for programs. Mostly games.
    >>
    >> I look at it this way, I can always take an image of C: drive
    >> periodically and put it on E: so I can restore from it with a
    >> bootable CD (Norton Ghost) and 15GB is fine for programs. (They can
    >> always be re-sized with Partitionmagic anyway).
    >>
    >> All my XviDs, pics and data files go on E:. There are several
    >> reasons for this set up. The main one is C: is at the front of the
    >> drive and is therefore the fastest part of the drive meaning Windows
    >> loads faster. Keeping it small also means I can back it up easilly
    >> in case of something going wrong. Programs next in the next-fastest
    >> part of the drive. Finally all my data files on E:. This way,
    >> derfagging the two "active" partitions doesn't take long at all and
    >> the system remains responsive. (Before I started this practice I had
    >> to re-install regularly as the OS got spread all over the HDD
    >> causing a lot of HDD trashing and slowing down). So, defragging C:
    >> and D: is quick and easy, no big XviD files and the like to have to
    >> be moved around. E: doesn't need defagging often at all as it's not
    >> constantly being written to and speed isn't so important here
    >> anyway. I'd much rather go with the two partition system you have, than
    >> a
    >> single big partition. It's not long before systems on one big
    >> partition get sluggish. You don't want all your data files getting
    >> mixed in with the OS files and taking up the faster parts of the
    >> drive. Two is nearly as good as three, the main reason I went for
    >> three is C: is smaller, therefore easier to back up (Programs can be
    >> reinstalled and "personalised" easier than the OS can). If 20GB
    >> *does* become too small then you can always re-size it if the rest
    >> of the drive isn't full. I think 20GB would be fine, if I didn't
    >> have some games that require 3GB each I wouldn't have made my
    >> programs partition so big. Cheers,
    >> --
    >> ~Shaun~

    > Thanks very much Shaun for your reply, most interesting. After
    > talking with one or two people, I gained the impression that it was
    > quite difficult to increase the size of C Drive at a later date
    > (given that there is plenty of space left on the rest of the drive).
    > Is there a program that could do this without upsetting any of the
    > programs or data already on the disk?


    Yes, I use PowerQuest PartionMagic Pro 7.0. I got it off a magazine cover as
    it's quite an old version but I used it just the other day on my 200GB WD
    HDD and it's fine. I've used it heaps of times, XP Pro, NTFS partitions,
    with not one problem. (It pops up a warning about having current back-ups
    but, as I said, I've never had it fail).

    As it came with a magazine I guess it would be OK to give you a copy,
    However, it's 22MB, emailing could be a problem unless you have a service
    that allows you to accept emails that big. The other option is a CD-R.

    Cheers,
    --
    ~Shaun~
     
    ~misfit~, Apr 10, 2006
    #8
  9. "JB" <> wrote:
    >I have been looking at a Sony Vaio laptop computer, but I see that the 60
    >gig drive has been partitioned into 20 gig for C Drive and 40 gig for D


    There are two schools of thought on partitioning. I like having a
    small-ish system partition, as I can do backups more easily, and can
    restore the system without changing my user data, which lives on a
    second, larger, partition. [I also like having a dedicated swapfile
    partition, but that's a rathole.]

    My wife prefers the "one giant partition" scheme, where everything
    lives on the one true drive. While it takes longer and uses more
    backup space, she never has to worry about what's where, nor will she
    run out of space on the system drive while the data drive still has
    plenty of room.

    It's really personal preference, but you should stick with one
    scheme...

    I use Ghost backups and restores to resize my partitions, but that's
    because I use it for backups. I've heard good things about Partition
    Magic, but never used it.
     
    William P.N. Smith, Apr 10, 2006
    #9
  10. It's really a good idea, when dealing with a large hard drive (over 40
    to 60 gigs) to partition the drive into at least 2 partitions, one
    containing the OS and programs and the 2nd containing data.

    Reasons:

    1. It makes backup of the data only easier. Just backup the data
    partition.

    2. There are failure modes that will destroy the entire contents of a
    partition but not the other partitions, and when these occur, it's most
    likely to occur on the OS partition. So you get a slightly greater
    degree of safety / reliability for your data by keeping it in a separate
    partition.

    There's a 3rd reason for very large hard drives, but it doesn't apply to
    laptops:

    3. Very large partitions will slow down the system performance. Drives
    and their associated data structures have to be searched to find files,
    folders, etc., and as the drive grows, so do the sizes of these data
    structures and the time required to search them. Not really much of an
    issue for drives under 100 gigabytes, but you probably don't want a
    single unpartitioned 200+ gigabyte drive (exception: If it's used only
    for storage of very, very large files such as video files).

    Also, one other comment, if you have any FAT32 partitions, FAT32 starts
    to really break down once the partition size goes beyond even 16
    gigabytes, and as a rule I won't create FAT32 partitions larger than 32
    gigabytes (Microsoft products won't create such a partition at all, but
    they can be created with 3rd party partitioning and formatting products,
    and if you do create them, Windows will use them, but it doesn't work well).


    William P.N. Smith wrote:

    > "JB" <> wrote:
    >
    >>I have been looking at a Sony Vaio laptop computer, but I see that the 60
    >>gig drive has been partitioned into 20 gig for C Drive and 40 gig for D

    >
    >
    > There are two schools of thought on partitioning. I like having a
    > small-ish system partition, as I can do backups more easily, and can
    > restore the system without changing my user data, which lives on a
    > second, larger, partition. [I also like having a dedicated swapfile
    > partition, but that's a rathole.]
    >
    > My wife prefers the "one giant partition" scheme, where everything
    > lives on the one true drive. While it takes longer and uses more
    > backup space, she never has to worry about what's where, nor will she
    > run out of space on the system drive while the data drive still has
    > plenty of room.
    >
    > It's really personal preference, but you should stick with one
    > scheme...
    >
    > I use Ghost backups and restores to resize my partitions, but that's
    > because I use it for backups. I've heard good things about Partition
    > Magic, but never used it.
     
    Barry Watzman, Apr 10, 2006
    #10
  11. JB

    MarkH Guest

    William P.N. Smith <> wrote in
    news::

    > [I also like having a dedicated swapfile
    > partition, but that's a rathole.]


    I have gained a noticeable improvement in performance by not having a
    swapfile at all. I have 2GB RAM and if that ever proves to be inadequate
    then I will immediately go out and buy another 2GB. This is different to
    back in the days when RAM cost about $100/MB. For what you paid for 4MB
    RAM a dozen years ago you can now buy 4GB RAM.


    --
    Mark Heyes (New Zealand)
    See my pics at www.gigatech.co.nz (last updated 5-September-05)
    "The person on the other side was a young woman. Very obviously a
    young woman. There was no possible way she could have been mistaken
    for a young man in any language, especially Braille."
    Maskerade
     
    MarkH, Apr 11, 2006
    #11
  12. JB

    ~misfit~ Guest

    William P.N. Smith wrote:
    > "JB" <> wrote:
    >> I have been looking at a Sony Vaio laptop computer, but I see that
    >> the 60 gig drive has been partitioned into 20 gig for C Drive and 40
    >> gig for D

    >
    > There are two schools of thought on partitioning. I like having a
    > small-ish system partition, as I can do backups more easily, and can
    > restore the system without changing my user data, which lives on a
    > second, larger, partition. [I also like having a dedicated swapfile
    > partition, but that's a rathole.]


    I do too, at the very beginning of a seperate drive to the OS (On a seperate
    channel), and formatted FAT32. But like you said, a rathole...
    --
    ~Shaun~
     
    ~misfit~, Apr 11, 2006
    #12

  13. >
    > Yes, I use PowerQuest PartionMagic Pro 7.0. I got it off a magazine cover
    > as it's quite an old version but I used it just the other day on my 200GB
    > WD HDD and it's fine. I've used it heaps of times, XP Pro, NTFS
    > partitions, with not one problem. (It pops up a warning about having
    > current back-ups but, as I said, I've never had it fail).
    >
    > As it came with a magazine I guess it would be OK to give you a copy,
    > However, it's 22MB, emailing could be a problem unless you have a service
    > that allows you to accept emails that big. The other option is a CD-R.
    >


    Here is a free file hosting site up to 60 megs
    http://www.savefile.com/
     
    Stop Humpin' My Leg Dawg!!, Apr 11, 2006
    #13
  14. JB

    Alan Guest

    I guess that if you post it to a site like that (I haven't looked at
    that one in particular but there are lots around) then post the link
    back here, anyone who wants it can go get it?

    Would that be legal?

    --

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    "Stop Humpin' My Leg Dawg!!" <> wrote in message
    news:gZF_f.360$AB3.300@fed1read02...
    >
    >>
    >> Yes, I use PowerQuest PartionMagic Pro 7.0. I got it off a magazine
    >> cover as it's quite an old version but I used it just the other day
    >> on my 200GB WD HDD and it's fine. I've used it heaps of times, XP
    >> Pro, NTFS partitions, with not one problem. (It pops up a warning
    >> about having current back-ups but, as I said, I've never had it
    >> fail).
    >>
    >> As it came with a magazine I guess it would be OK to give you a
    >> copy, However, it's 22MB, emailing could be a problem unless you
    >> have a service that allows you to accept emails that big. The other
    >> option is a CD-R.
    >>

    >
    > Here is a free file hosting site up to 60 megs
    > http://www.savefile.com/
    >
     
    Alan, Apr 11, 2006
    #14
  15. JB

    DK Guest

    In article <>, "JB" <> wrote:
    >I have been looking at a Sony Vaio laptop computer, but I see that the 60
    >gig drive has been partitioned into 20 gig for C Drive and 40 gig for D
    >drive. Even with the 80 gig model, C Drive is still limited to 20 gig. With
    >Windows taking more than 2 gig, I wondered whether you consider that a
    >maximum of 20 gig for C Drive is enough for Windows, and lots of future
    >programs? Is there any benefit in partitioning a laptop hard drive like
    >this? Thanks for your thoughts on this.


    I have set up 4 Gb for C: drive. This lets me always make system
    backup and full restore CD/DVD quickly and without any hassle. The
    rest programs and data goes to D: and E: which are set to be backuped
    incrememntally on monthly and daily basis to a separate hard drive.
    Swapfile is also on a separate drive.

    DK
     
    DK, Apr 11, 2006
    #15
  16. JB

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Alan wrote:
    > I guess that if you post it to a site like that (I haven't looked at
    > that one in particular but there are lots around) then post the link
    > back here, anyone who wants it can go get it?
    >
    > Would that be legal?


    I guess.

    I'm uploading it now. Don't register it, you can still use it without
    registering (I have it on two PCs) as I've registered it already and I don't
    know if it has a unique ID. I've had to re-name it to .jpg as that site
    wouldn't let me upload an .exe file. Just re-name it back to .exe.

    I'll get back with the link when it's done.
    --
    ~Shaun~
     
    ~misfit~, Apr 11, 2006
    #16
  17. JB

    Gordon Guest

    On Mon, 10 Apr 2006 20:56:15 +1200, Dave Doe wrote:

    > Well I'd like someone to correct me if I'm wrong - but I fail to see the
    > point in partitioning a drive for 'speed'. ie as is so often typically
    > seen, a small partition is created for the swap file (short of it being
    > on *another* (physical) hard disk drive, I just don't see the point).
    >
    > So I think that, at the end of the day, extra partitions just waste
    > space (albeit not much).
    >
    > re setup per OP - I don't see the point in that either. It just limits
    > you to be forced (eventually anyway) to change the default install
    > location for s/w from c:\<pf>\<vendor> - to d:...
    >
    > Given the 80Gb drive - if it were me, I'd use one partition only.


    As some said there are two schools of thought. It depends on how your
    brain works.

    For me one large partition is a pain because *everything* is there. It
    hard to back up owing to the size.

    Also having a OS on its own partition allows one format this partition
    should a reinstall be necessary without wiping the rest of the system.
    True some DLL's go west.

    Anyhow, it your choice, is that not nice?
     
    Gordon, Apr 11, 2006
    #17
  18. JB

    ~misfit~ Guest

    ~misfit~ wrote:
    > Alan wrote:
    >> I guess that if you post it to a site like that (I haven't looked at
    >> that one in particular but there are lots around) then post the link
    >> back here, anyone who wants it can go get it?
    >>
    >> Would that be legal?

    >
    > I guess.
    >
    > I'm uploading it now. Don't register it, you can still use it without
    > registering (I have it on two PCs) as I've registered it already and
    > I don't know if it has a unique ID. I've had to re-name it to .jpg as
    > that site wouldn't let me upload an .exe file. Just re-name it back
    > to .exe.
    > I'll get back with the link when it's done.


    http://www.savefile.com/files/9801965

    What I tried to say above is that, on one of my PCs it isn't registered but
    it's working fine and has been for ages.

    Enjoy.
    --
    ~Shaun~
     
    ~misfit~, Apr 11, 2006
    #18
  19. JB

    Dave Taylor Guest

    "JB" <> wrote in news:443a299a$:

    > Is there a program that could do this
    > without upsetting any of the programs or data already on the disk?
    >
    >


    QTParted comes with most Linux Live CDs.

    I have used it. It is free.



    --
    Ciao, Dave
     
    Dave Taylor, Apr 11, 2006
    #19
  20. JB

    _DD Guest

    On Mon, 10 Apr 2006 21:25:24 +1200, "~misfit~"
    <> wrote:

    >I look at it this way, I can always take an image of C: drive periodically
    >and put it on E: so I can restore from it with a bootable CD (Norton Ghost)
    >and 15GB is fine for programs. (They can always be re-sized with
    >Partitionmagic anyway).


    Stated very well.

    Paraphrased: The main reason to use two partitions is that there are
    two types of info on hard drives: Executable programs and Data.
    Programs, including those in the C:\Windows folder, need to be backed
    up with an 'imaging' program. Data can be backed up incrementally
    (like with 'copy' or drag-and-drop) and does not need to be imaged.

    By the way, Acronis also makes a drive imaging program called True
    Image. I believe Partition Magic is now absorbed by the Norton
    syndicate, and no doubt turned into a huge hulking monstrosity.
     
    _DD, Apr 11, 2006
    #20
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