2 Ethernet router help please

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by Alan, Nov 25, 2004.

  1. Alan

    Alan Guest

    We're a small company who now have a need to split off a bit of our network
    and have the 2 ethernets both fed from the same leased line (2MB).

    Is there a decent router with 2 ethernet ports available at a reasonable
    price?

    Many thanks in advance
    Alan

    P.S. I know this will have been asked before but Google searches just
    confused me.
    Alan, Nov 25, 2004
    #1
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  2. "Alan" <> wrote in message
    news:co4het$dcc$1$...
    > We're a small company who now have a need to split off a bit of our

    network
    > and have the 2 ethernets both fed from the same leased line (2MB).
    >
    > Is there a decent router with 2 ethernet ports available at a reasonable
    > price?
    >
    > Many thanks in advance
    > Alan
    >
    > P.S. I know this will have been asked before but Google searches just
    > confused me.
    >
    >


    I believe you can get a 2611XM for just under $2000. If you want a layer 3
    switch, you can get a 24 port 3550 for around $2000 also (SMI...EMI runs
    over $3000). If you only need ethernet ports and are doing static routing
    only, I'd go with the 3550. If you need any other type of port, look at the
    2600 series routers or possible the 2801, though I have no experinece with
    the 2800 series).
    Richard R. Field, Nov 25, 2004
    #2
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  3. Alan

    Erik Freitag Guest

    On Thu, 25 Nov 2004 15:46:32 +0000, Richard R. Field wrote:

    >
    > "Alan" <> wrote in message
    > news:co4het$dcc$1$...
    >> We're a small company who now have a need to split off a bit of our

    > network
    >> and have the 2 ethernets both fed from the same leased line (2MB).
    >>
    >> Is there a decent router with 2 ethernet ports available at a reasonable
    >> price?
    >>
    >> Many thanks in advance
    >> Alan
    >>
    >> P.S. I know this will have been asked before but Google searches just
    >> confused me.
    >>
    >>


    2 minutes on ebay show a 1750 with a T1 WIC for a buy-it-now price of
    $699. I didn't see an Ethernet WIC for your 2nd Ethernet, but I didn't
    look very hard. There was also a 26xx with a T1 interface and a bunch of
    Ethernet ports (think it said 6) for $525.00.

    Purchase at your own risk - I didn't check licensing.
    Erik Freitag, Nov 25, 2004
    #3
  4. Alan

    PES Guest

    Alan wrote:
    > We're a small company who now have a need to split off a bit of our network
    > and have the 2 ethernets both fed from the same leased line (2MB).
    >
    > Is there a decent router with 2 ethernet ports available at a reasonable
    > price?
    >
    > Many thanks in advance
    > Alan
    >
    > P.S. I know this will have been asked before but Google searches just
    > confused me.
    >
    >

    The 1841 is the best price performance Cisco dual FastEthernet router I
    know of.

    --
    -------------------------
    Paul Stewart
    Lexnet Inc.
    Email address is in ROT13
    PES, Nov 25, 2004
    #4
  5. Alan

    hegel Guest

    "Richard R. Field" <> wrote in message news:<s7npd.149922$R05.62810@attbi_s53>...
    > "Alan" <> wrote in message
    > news:co4het$dcc$1$...
    > > We're a small company who now have a need to split off a bit of our

    > network
    > > and have the 2 ethernets both fed from the same leased line (2MB).
    > >
    > > Is there a decent router with 2 ethernet ports available at a reasonable
    > > price?
    > >
    > > Many thanks in advance
    > > Alan
    > >
    > > P.S. I know this will have been asked before but Google searches just
    > > confused me.
    > >
    > >

    >
    > I believe you can get a 2611XM for just under $2000. If you want a layer 3
    > switch, you can get a 24 port 3550 for around $2000 also (SMI...EMI runs
    > over $3000). If you only need ethernet ports and are doing static routing
    > only, I'd go with the 3550. If you need any other type of port, look at the
    > 2600 series routers or possible the 2801, though I have no experinece with
    > the 2800 series).



    How many users are in your network? If it's a small network, with
    less than 50 users I would suggest a 1721 with the additional
    WIC-1ENET card. This may be a lot more cost affective.
    hegel, Nov 25, 2004
    #5
  6. In article <co4het$dcc$1$>,
    Alan <> wrote:
    :We're a small company who now have a need to split off a bit of our network
    :and have the 2 ethernets both fed from the same leased line (2MB).

    :Is there a decent router with 2 ethernet ports available at a reasonable
    :price?

    In addition to the points and questions the others have posed, I would
    ask for expansion on a couple of points:

    - do you need the device you will be purchasing to handle internal
    routing as well as external routing? For example, will you be handling
    multiple IP address ranges through this device? VLANs? Are you,
    for example, thinking that you might construct a "dmz", with public
    servers in one IP range, and internal devices in another IP range,
    and communication between the two ranges mediated by the router?
    In conjunction with this: are you planning to use internal numbering
    for some portion of your devices and have the router do Network Address
    Translation ?

    - what security features do you expect to need during the intended
    lifetime of the equipment? Are you thinking that it'd be nice if
    the new router could handle firewall-type statefull packet inspection?
    Will the split-off network need to communicate extensively with the
    existing network, but with security precautions in place?

    - Were you thinking of having the new device handle VPN services?
    If so, how many peers?

    - What is the realistic chance that the 2 Mbit line will be
    upgraded within the expected lifetime of the router? These days
    a lot of broadband providers (ADSL, cable modems) provide feeds
    whose nominal peak bandwidth is 2 Mbps and higher.

    - What kind of interface does the leased line have? I notice
    your posting host seems to be in the UK: is it an E1 link?
    Full or half duplex? If it is E1, are you using it channelized
    or unchannelized, and is there any voice traffic over it?

    - Do you want to be able to do traffic shaping or policing or
    other QoS services in order to control the bandwidth proportions
    that the two different networks will be alloted?

    - What is an upper bound on the number of different devices
    you will have internally? In other words, a maximum on the number of
    entries in the MAC address table.
    --
    Those were borogoves and the momerathsoutgrabe completely mimsy.
    Walter Roberson, Nov 26, 2004
    #6
  7. Alan

    MDCXCI Guest

    If you have a managed switch in your network, you can Trunk or
    encapsulate the interface between the router and managed switch and
    use one ethernet interface for both sub-nets.

    btw what kind of router do you have? What is you bandwidth to the
    internet?
    MDCXCI, Nov 26, 2004
    #7
  8. In article <>,
    MDCXCI <> wrote:
    :If you have a managed switch in your network, you can Trunk or
    :encapsulate the interface between the router and managed switch and
    :use one ethernet interface for both sub-nets.

    Good point.

    Tiny nit, though: a switch doesn't -have- to be managed in order to
    support VLANs. Counterexamples include some of the low-cost Netgear
    switches.


    :btw what kind of router do you have? What is you bandwidth to the
    :internet?

    The OP indicated 2 Mbit/s, but I didn't see information about their
    current router.
    --
    Ceci, ce n'est pas une idée.
    Walter Roberson, Nov 26, 2004
    #8
  9. Alan

    MDCXCI Guest

    -cnrc.gc.ca (Walter Roberson) wrote in message news:<co66us$fl4$>...
    > In article <>,
    > MDCXCI <> wrote:
    > :If you have a managed switch in your network, you can Trunk or
    > :encapsulate the interface between the router and managed switch and
    > :use one ethernet interface for both sub-nets.
    >
    > Good point.
    >
    > Tiny nit, though: a switch doesn't -have- to be managed in order to
    > support VLANs. Counterexamples include some of the low-cost Netgear
    > switches.
    >
    >
    > :btw what kind of router do you have? What is you bandwidth to the
    > :internet?
    >
    > The OP indicated 2 Mbit/s, but I didn't see information about their
    > current router.


    Two issues:
    1. If the switch is not managed, how do you control what vlans egress
    which non-trunked ports?

    2. I did not assume that the 2MB was the total bandwidth. It could be
    the amount of bandwidth that Alan wants to send to the new segment.
    MDCXCI, Nov 26, 2004
    #9
  10. In article <>,
    MDCXCI <> wrote:
    |-cnrc.gc.ca (Walter Roberson) wrote in message news:<co66us$fl4$>...
    |> Tiny nit, though: a switch doesn't -have- to be managed in order to
    |> support VLANs.

    |Two issues:
    |1. If the switch is not managed, how do you control what vlans egress
    |which non-trunked ports?

    There's a difference between a switch being configurable and the same
    switch being "managed". A "managed" switch is one that provides SNMP
    or RMON.

    But the terms are market-speak more than technical defintions, so they
    are subject to debate.


    :2. I did not assume that the 2MB was the total bandwidth. It could be
    :the amount of bandwidth that Alan wants to send to the new segment.


    The exact wording was,

    "We're a small company who now have a need to split off a bit of our
    network and have the 2 ethernets both fed from the same leased line
    (2MB)."

    The "(2MB)" is closest to "leased line" not to "2 ethernets", so
    in English the "(2MB) modifies "leased line", not the amount of bandwidth
    to be given to each line.

    We aren't told what the native language of the poster is, but the
    original posting was from the UK, and 'alan' is a typical English name
    [one source says that it derives from the Celtic word for 'handsome'].
    Chances are thus that the original poster's native language is English
    and hence that the 2 MB gives the total line capacity rather than
    being a misplaced modifier of how much capacity was to be given to
    the new segment.
    --
    Warning: potentially contains traces of nuts.
    Walter Roberson, Nov 26, 2004
    #10
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