2 different IP addresses on same PC?

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by Jeff, Jan 18, 2006.

  1. Jeff

    Jeff Guest

    I've been having trouble with intermittent loss of access to the internet on
    a laptop in my wireless home lan connecting through a router. No solutions
    so far, but checking my settings using "FreshDiagnose", similar to Aida 32.
    I just noticed that I have 2 IP addresses on this laptop. Could this be the
    problem?

    Whereas ipconfig/all says my ip is 192.186.2.186. in FreshDiagnose, in the
    Network screen, I notice that:
    - under "General info" the local IP is listed as 192.186.2.186
    - under TCP/IP the ip address is listed as 192.168.2.178 (!)
    with DHCP enabled, Address Type "assigned by DHCP". The rest is all OK.

    Why would I have 2 different IP addresses? Could this be the problem?

    Jeff
    Jeff, Jan 18, 2006
    #1
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  2. Hi
    Most Laptops have Wire and Wireless Client cards.
    So one IP is probably associated with the Wire and one with the Wireless.
    Jack (MVP-Networking).

    "Jeff" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I've been having trouble with intermittent loss of access to the internet
    > on a laptop in my wireless home lan connecting through a router. No
    > solutions so far, but checking my settings using "FreshDiagnose", similar
    > to Aida 32. I just noticed that I have 2 IP addresses on this laptop.
    > Could this be the problem?
    >
    > Whereas ipconfig/all says my ip is 192.186.2.186. in FreshDiagnose, in the
    > Network screen, I notice that:
    > - under "General info" the local IP is listed as 192.186.2.186
    > - under TCP/IP the ip address is listed as 192.168.2.178 (!)
    > with DHCP enabled, Address Type "assigned by DHCP". The rest is all
    > OK.
    >
    > Why would I have 2 different IP addresses? Could this be the problem?
    >
    > Jeff
    >
    Jack \(MVP-Networking\)., Jan 18, 2006
    #2
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  3. ipconfig /all

    should show *all* the interfaces and their IP addresses. Even plain old
    "ipconfig" should do that!
    So, if it doesn't then that is really strange if you really have 2 addresses
    somehow.

    In order for there to be a DHCP assigned address you need to be connected to
    a DHCP server. That could be a router, or whatever.

    You did say that you're operating wireless. So that is likely the DHCP
    assigned address. The other one could be an unused Ethernet port with a
    static address assigned. You could disable that one but I don't think it
    will matter.

    You might try assigning a static IP address for the wireless. It shouldn't
    matter but maybe the time to live is too short and you're experiencing the
    time it takes to renegotiate for a new address.

    Fred
    Fred Marshall, Jan 18, 2006
    #3
  4. Jeff

    Guest

    On 18-Jan-2006, "Fred Marshall" <fmarshallx@remove_the_x.acm.org> wrote:

    > You might try assigning a static IP address for the wireless. It shouldn't
    > matter but maybe the time to live is too short and you're experiencing the
    > time it takes to renegotiate for a new address.


    Static addresses seem to solve some problems arising out of address
    conflicts, my WinXP no longer has the pop-up, IP address conflict detected.
    Putting them in an unlikely range for a small network like xxx.xxx.xxx.041 up
    also seems a good idea since I assume DHCP addresses are allocated
    sequentially from the bottom up, rather than randomly?
    Of course the pop-up doesn't tell you which items had conflicting addresses,
    but I assume it is in a log, if only you could find the log file.

    ..
    , Jan 19, 2006
    #4
  5. Jeff

    Jeff Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > On 18-Jan-2006, "Fred Marshall" <fmarshallx@remove_the_x.acm.org> wrote:
    >
    >> You might try assigning a static IP address for the wireless. It
    >> shouldn't
    >> matter but maybe the time to live is too short and you're experiencing
    >> the
    >> time it takes to renegotiate for a new address.

    >
    > Static addresses seem to solve some problems arising out of address
    > conflicts, my WinXP no longer has the pop-up, IP address conflict
    > detected.
    > Putting them in an unlikely range for a small network like xxx.xxx.xxx.041
    > up
    > also seems a good idea since I assume DHCP addresses are allocated
    > sequentially from the bottom up, rather than randomly?
    > Of course the pop-up doesn't tell you which items had conflicting
    > addresses,
    > but I assume it is in a log, if only you could find the log file.
    >

    How exactly (step by step) do you set up static IP addresses for a wireless
    lan in XP Home? what are the downsides - if any - of static addresses rather
    than the standard XP way?
    Jeff, Jan 20, 2006
    #5
  6. "Jeff" <> wrote in message
    news:%...
    >
    > <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >>
    >> On 18-Jan-2006, "Fred Marshall" <fmarshallx@remove_the_x.acm.org> wrote:
    >>
    >>> You might try assigning a static IP address for the wireless. It
    >>> shouldn't
    >>> matter but maybe the time to live is too short and you're experiencing
    >>> the
    >>> time it takes to renegotiate for a new address.

    >>
    >> Static addresses seem to solve some problems arising out of address
    >> conflicts, my WinXP no longer has the pop-up, IP address conflict
    >> detected.
    >> Putting them in an unlikely range for a small network like
    >> xxx.xxx.xxx.041 up
    >> also seems a good idea since I assume DHCP addresses are allocated
    >> sequentially from the bottom up, rather than randomly?
    >> Of course the pop-up doesn't tell you which items had conflicting
    >> addresses,
    >> but I assume it is in a log, if only you could find the log file.
    >>

    > How exactly (step by step) do you set up static IP addresses for a
    > wireless lan in XP Home? what are the downsides - if any - of static
    > addresses rather than the standard XP way?


    Control Panel / Network Connections / Right click on the wireless interface
    / Select Properties / Go to TCP/IP in the list in the inner window /
    highlight Internet Protocol TCP/IP / Click on Properties / Click box "Use
    the Following IP Address" / Type in the IP address you want to use / type in
    the netmask you will use probably 255.255.255.0 / type in the IP address of
    your gateway ... likely your router or dsl modem INSIDE or LAN address /
    Type in DNS addresses .. I like to use those from my ISP but you might also
    list the router IP address.

    Static addresses are much neater in that there's no waiting for them to be
    assigned and there is less confusion. Computers remain with the same IP
    addresses always. Then you can PING one that's turned on and know that's
    what you're doing.
    The only reason I can think of to NOT use static addresses is if there are
    lots of computers and/or if you're too lazy to configure computers in
    general.
    The best way to use static and DHCP addresses together is to choose a range
    you will use for static addresses and another range you will use for DHCP.
    For example:

    Static addresses from 192.168.1.1 to 192.168.1.99
    Dynamic addresses from 192.168.1.100 to 192.168.1.xxx where xxx might be 105
    or 110 or 120 or 150 .... depending on how many you think you might have to
    have assigned automatically.

    I generally use DHCP for "visitors" and static addresses for everything that
    lives permanently on my LAN.

    There should *never* be address conflicts. That can only happen if you let
    the DHCP and static addresses overlap. For example, you have a computer (or
    a printer) with a static address and, for some reason, that address is
    hard-coded into something else in the system.
    Then, you turn that computer or printer off for a while.
    In the mean time, a dynamically addressed computer turns on and is assigned
    that very IP address because you allow the addresses to overlap.
    Then, when you turn on the original, fixed address, computer - there is a
    conflict.

    So, you just make sure the DHCP range and your manual/fixed range don't
    overlap. You do this by paying attention to the addresses you configure
    manually and by setting the DHCP range elsewhere. Obviously you don't
    manually set up the same IP address on two or more devices/computers either!

    Fred
    Fred Marshall, Jan 20, 2006
    #6
  7. Jeff

    Jeff Guest

    Fred Marshall wrote:
    > Control Panel / Network Connections / Right click on the wireless
    > interface / Select Properties / Go to TCP/IP in the list in the inner
    > window / highlight Internet Protocol TCP/IP / Click on Properties /
    > Click box "Use the Following IP Address" / Type in the IP address you
    > want to use / type in the netmask you will use probably 255.255.255.0


    ......

    Thank you very much.

    Jeff
    Jeff, Jan 21, 2006
    #7
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