15A power question

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by AD., Feb 5, 2009.

  1. AD.

    AD. Guest

    Hi all,

    I'm picking out a new UPS for a small low tech server room, and the
    model I'd like requires 15A input power. I'm just trying to get a
    better handle on what kind of stuff the electrician would need to do
    before I start getting them onsite, or whether I should stick to the
    smaller UPS models (I'd rather not).

    A quick google (I'm no electrician) indicates that 15A sockets are
    slightly different (bigger earth pin) than the plain old 10A ones
    which I'm pretty sure is all that's there. The switchboard seems to
    have 20A circuit breakers in place, but I don't know how relevant that
    is.

    Does anyone have a good idea how likely would it be that we'd need a
    whole new circuit for 15A power, or whether it is just a case of new
    sockets?

    --
    Cheers
    Anton
     
    AD., Feb 5, 2009
    #1
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  2. AD.

    Richard Guest

    AD. wrote:
    > Hi all,
    >
    > I'm picking out a new UPS for a small low tech server room, and the
    > model I'd like requires 15A input power. I'm just trying to get a
    > better handle on what kind of stuff the electrician would need to do
    > before I start getting them onsite, or whether I should stick to the
    > smaller UPS models (I'd rather not).
    >
    > A quick google (I'm no electrician) indicates that 15A sockets are
    > slightly different (bigger earth pin) than the plain old 10A ones
    > which I'm pretty sure is all that's there. The switchboard seems to
    > have 20A circuit breakers in place, but I don't know how relevant that
    > is.
    >
    > Does anyone have a good idea how likely would it be that we'd need a
    > whole new circuit for 15A power, or whether it is just a case of new
    > sockets?


    If its just one on the circuit then they can just swap over the outlets
    on the wall.

    If its more then one, then logic says you cant have 2 15 amp loads on a
    20 amp breaker and expect it not to trip - they are still classed as
    general purpose outlets so don't have to be individually breakered like
    the only other option which is the 16 amp blue ones that caravans also use.

    I got one for my welder, really I dont know why all outlets aren't 15
    amps because it would allow for much gruntier appliances which is an
    issue for cooking ones.
     
    Richard, Feb 5, 2009
    #2
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  3. AD.

    EMB Guest

    AD. wrote:
    > Hi all,
    >
    > I'm picking out a new UPS for a small low tech server room, and the
    > model I'd like requires 15A input power. I'm just trying to get a
    > better handle on what kind of stuff the electrician would need to do
    > before I start getting them onsite, or whether I should stick to the
    > smaller UPS models (I'd rather not).
    >
    > A quick google (I'm no electrician) indicates that 15A sockets are
    > slightly different (bigger earth pin) than the plain old 10A ones
    > which I'm pretty sure is all that's there. The switchboard seems to
    > have 20A circuit breakers in place, but I don't know how relevant that
    > is.
    >
    > Does anyone have a good idea how likely would it be that we'd need a
    > whole new circuit for 15A power, or whether it is just a case of new
    > sockets?


    The distance from the switchboard to the power outlet will define what
    size cable you need. If the existing circuit is 1.5mm2 you're right on
    the 16A limit of the cable and can run to about 11m before voltage drop
    becomes an issue (ie greater than 2.5%). If you use 2.5mm2 cable the
    maximum run is 22m, and 4mm2 cable will allow a run to 37m.

    Given that a 20A breaker is on the circuit the cable should be 2.5mm2 so
    you're probably ok with the existing wiring.
     
    EMB, Feb 5, 2009
    #3
  4. AD.

    PeeCee Guest

    "Collector€NZ" <> wrote in message
    news:498a7042$...
    snip
    > Providing the UPS is the only device on that circuit, anything else leads
    > to the possibility that a fault on that item could trip the breaker.
    >
    > Rule 1 oversize UPS supply cables. Capacity increases over time
    > Rule 2 never ever allow anything else to be powered from a circuit
    > supplying a ups.




    Amen to that.

    Paul.
     
    PeeCee, Feb 5, 2009
    #4
  5. AD.

    Peter M Guest

    On Thu, 05 Feb 2009 17:45:12 +1300, Collector€NZ <> wrote:

    >EMB wrote:
    >> AD. wrote:
    >>> Hi all,
    >>>
    >>> I'm picking out a new UPS for a small low tech server room, and the
    >>> model I'd like requires 15A input power. I'm just trying to get a
    >>> better handle on what kind of stuff the electrician would need to do
    >>> before I start getting them onsite, or whether I should stick to the
    >>> smaller UPS models (I'd rather not).
    >>>
    >>> A quick google (I'm no electrician) indicates that 15A sockets are
    >>> slightly different (bigger earth pin) than the plain old 10A ones
    >>> which I'm pretty sure is all that's there. The switchboard seems to
    >>> have 20A circuit breakers in place, but I don't know how relevant that
    >>> is.
    >>>
    >>> Does anyone have a good idea how likely would it be that we'd need a
    >>> whole new circuit for 15A power, or whether it is just a case of new
    >>> sockets?

    >>
    >> The distance from the switchboard to the power outlet will define what
    >> size cable you need. If the existing circuit is 1.5mm2 you're right on
    >> the 16A limit of the cable and can run to about 11m before voltage drop
    >> becomes an issue (ie greater than 2.5%). If you use 2.5mm2 cable the
    >> maximum run is 22m, and 4mm2 cable will allow a run to 37m.
    >>
    >> Given that a 20A breaker is on the circuit the cable should be 2.5mm2 so
    >> you're probably ok with the existing wiring.

    >Providing the UPS is the only device on that circuit, anything else
    >leads to the possibility that a fault on that item could trip the breaker.
    >
    >Rule 1 oversize UPS supply cables. Capacity increases over time
    >Rule 2 never ever allow anything else to be powered from a circuit
    >supplying a ups.




    And use captive plugs that can't fall out..



    The ones that we used in the pass were Reyrolle ones, but I think they have now changed
     
    Peter M, Feb 5, 2009
    #5
  6. AD.

    AD. Guest

    On Feb 5, 5:45 pm, Collector€NZ <> wrote:
    > EMB wrote:
    > > The distance from the switchboard to the power outlet will define what
    > > size cable you need.  If the existing circuit is 1.5mm2 you're right on
    > > the 16A limit of the cable and can run to about 11m before voltage drop
    > > becomes an issue (ie greater than 2.5%).  If you use 2.5mm2 cable the
    > > maximum run is 22m, and 4mm2 cable will allow a run to 37m.

    >
    > > Given that a 20A breaker is on the circuit the cable should be 2.5mm2 so
    > > you're probably ok with the existing wiring.

    >
    > Providing the UPS is the only device on that circuit, anything else
    > leads to the possibility that a fault on that item could trip the breaker..
    >
    > Rule 1 oversize UPS supply cables. Capacity increases over time
    > Rule 2 never ever allow anything else to be powered from a circuit
    > supplying a ups.


    Thanks guys, it's all a bit clearer now and I'll be able to talk a bit
    more knowledgeably with the electrician.

    --
    Cheers
    Anton
     
    AD., Feb 5, 2009
    #6
  7. AD.

    EMB Guest

    Peter M wrote:
    > And use captive plugs that can't fall out..
    >
    > The ones that we used in the pass were Reyrolle ones, but I think they have now changed


    Metal-bodied Reyrolle plugs have been illegal in new installations for
    about 2 decades. PDL 56 series and their ilk have been the standard since.
     
    EMB, Feb 5, 2009
    #7
  8. AD.

    Guest

    On Feb 5, 4:41 pm, "AD." <> wrote:
    > Hi all,
    >
    > I'm picking out a new UPS for a small low tech server room, and the
    > model I'd like requires 15A input power. I'm just trying to get a
    > better handle on what kind of stuff the electrician would need to do
    > before I start getting them onsite, or whether I should stick to the
    > smaller UPS models (I'd rather not).
    >
    > A quick google (I'm no electrician) indicates that 15A sockets are
    > slightly different (bigger earth pin) than the plain old 10A ones
    > which I'm pretty sure is all that's there. The switchboard seems to
    > have 20A circuit breakers in place, but I don't know how relevant that
    > is.
    >
    > Does anyone have a good idea how likely would it be that we'd need a
    > whole new circuit for 15A power, or whether it is just a case of new
    > sockets?
    >
    > --
    > Cheers
    > Anton


    There will be a calculation....the time to trip is dependant on the
    resistance of the circuit...so a bigger earth wire should mean a lower
    resistance and a faster trip, there is a lot of energy there, which in
    a fault is turning into heat....15A sounds like a big UPS, 3kw plus?

    It depends on what else that curcuit powers....but I'd suggest a
    dedicated curcuit just to the UPS.....The UPS manufacturer should be
    able to tell you what curcuit breaker size as well....

    regards

    Thing
     
    , Feb 6, 2009
    #8
  9. AD.

    Richard Guest

    wrote:
    > On Feb 5, 4:41 pm, "AD." <> wrote:
    >> Hi all,
    >>
    >> I'm picking out a new UPS for a small low tech server room, and the
    >> model I'd like requires 15A input power. I'm just trying to get a
    >> better handle on what kind of stuff the electrician would need to do
    >> before I start getting them onsite, or whether I should stick to the
    >> smaller UPS models (I'd rather not).
    >>
    >> A quick google (I'm no electrician) indicates that 15A sockets are
    >> slightly different (bigger earth pin) than the plain old 10A ones
    >> which I'm pretty sure is all that's there. The switchboard seems to
    >> have 20A circuit breakers in place, but I don't know how relevant that
    >> is.
    >>
    >> Does anyone have a good idea how likely would it be that we'd need a
    >> whole new circuit for 15A power, or whether it is just a case of new
    >> sockets?
    >>
    >> --
    >> Cheers
    >> Anton

    >
    > There will be a calculation....the time to trip is dependant on the
    > resistance of the circuit...so a bigger earth wire should mean a lower
    > resistance and a faster trip, there is a lot of energy there, which in
    > a fault is turning into heat....15A sounds like a big UPS, 3kw plus?
    >
    > It depends on what else that curcuit powers....but I'd suggest a
    > dedicated curcuit just to the UPS.....The UPS manufacturer should be
    > able to tell you what curcuit breaker size as well....



    There is no difference in putting a 15a GPO on a circuit vs a normal 10a
    one. Its only when you get to the larger industrual outlets that there
    are calculations and stuff, and breaker selection matters depending on
    the load connected. Despite what most people in factories believe you
    cant just yank a machine out of one outlet and plug it into another even
    tho they both may be 32a 3ph+n+e ones, they may be setup differently,
    particually when setup to drive a motor.
     
    Richard, Feb 7, 2009
    #9
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