128-bit WEP key

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by Ray, Mar 16, 2005.

  1. Ray

    Ray Guest

    I have some query about 128-bit WEP key.

    As far as I know, 128-bit WEP key contains 13 ASCII characters or 26 hex
    keys. On my Netgear wireless router, I type either 11 or 13 ASCII
    characters into passphrase that all generate 26 hex keys. Is it correct or
    a propriritory WEP key?

    When I use WEP key generator at
    http://www.andrewscompanies.com/tools/wep.asp, I type 11 ASCII characters
    and output 22 hex keys and 13 ASCII characters output 26 hex keys. Why is
    there such difference?

    Can I use less than 13 ASCII characters for 128-bit WEP key or I have to use
    exact 13 ASCII characters for 128-bit WEP key?

    Your advice is highly appreciated.

    Thanks,

    Ray
    Ray, Mar 16, 2005
    #1
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  2. Ray

    Kerry Brown Guest

    "Ray" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I have some query about 128-bit WEP key.
    >
    > As far as I know, 128-bit WEP key contains 13 ASCII characters or 26 hex
    > keys. On my Netgear wireless router, I type either 11 or 13 ASCII
    > characters into passphrase that all generate 26 hex keys. Is it correct
    > or a propriritory WEP key?
    >


    Can you use a HEX key with the Netgear? I find ASCII passkeys hardly ever
    work unless all the equipment on the network is the same brand. Some brands
    use a proprietary algorithm to generate a HEX key from the passkey you
    enter.

    Kerry
    Kerry Brown, Mar 16, 2005
    #2
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  3. Ray

    Ray Guest

    Kerry,

    I can use HEX decimal key on Netgear.

    Currently I use this way to make the wireless LAN work. Type the password
    into passphrase of Netgear and got the hex decimal key - very strange always
    26 hex decimal keys if I type in 6 to 13 characters. I copy the key and
    place it into other client machines.

    Alternatively, I type exact 13 characters into passphrase of Wep key
    generator and copy the hex decimal key to Netgear and other client machines.
    It also works. However, I cannot type less than 13 characters for 128-bit
    wep key as some units count no of key to determine if 64-bit or 128-bit wep
    key.

    It causes me confused due to the fact that I type the same password in both
    systems and get totally different keys. In normal use, ie., hot spots, all
    the people are using password not hex decimal key. How do the computers
    convert the correct hex decimal key to unlock the encryption?

    Ray


    "Kerry Brown" <*o*m> wrote in message
    news:uY17$...
    > "Ray" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >>I have some query about 128-bit WEP key.
    >>
    >> As far as I know, 128-bit WEP key contains 13 ASCII characters or 26 hex
    >> keys. On my Netgear wireless router, I type either 11 or 13 ASCII
    >> characters into passphrase that all generate 26 hex keys. Is it correct
    >> or a propriritory WEP key?
    >>

    >
    > Can you use a HEX key with the Netgear? I find ASCII passkeys hardly ever
    > work unless all the equipment on the network is the same brand. Some
    > brands use a proprietary algorithm to generate a HEX key from the passkey
    > you enter.
    >
    > Kerry
    >
    >
    Ray, Mar 17, 2005
    #3
  4. Ray

    Kerry Brown Guest

    "Ray" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Kerry,
    >
    > I can use HEX decimal key on Netgear.
    >
    > Currently I use this way to make the wireless LAN work. Type the password
    > into passphrase of Netgear and got the hex decimal key - very strange
    > always 26 hex decimal keys if I type in 6 to 13 characters. I copy the
    > key and place it into other client machines.
    >
    > Alternatively, I type exact 13 characters into passphrase of Wep key
    > generator and copy the hex decimal key to Netgear and other client
    > machines. It also works. However, I cannot type less than 13 characters
    > for 128-bit wep key as some units count no of key to determine if 64-bit
    > or 128-bit wep key.
    >
    > It causes me confused due to the fact that I type the same password in
    > both systems and get totally different keys. In normal use, ie., hot
    > spots, all the people are using password not hex decimal key. How do the
    > computers convert the correct hex decimal key to unlock the encryption?
    >


    There are no standards for key generation. different manufacturers use
    different algorithms. That's why I suggested always using hex. The password
    for a hotspot has nothing to do with the WEP key. It is to authenticate you
    as a paid up customer.

    Kerry
    Kerry Brown, Mar 17, 2005
    #4
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