127.0.0.1

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Simon Smith, Mar 13, 2005.

  1. Simon Smith

    Simon Smith Guest

    Can some one please tell me why the numbers 127.0.0.1 some times appear in
    my mail settings in place of my correct email ID ?
    These are getting changed automaticly without my permission and when it
    happens I cant log on properly.
    Any advice would be appreciated
    Thanks
     
    Simon Smith, Mar 13, 2005
    #1
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  2. Simon Smith

    Spider Guest

    It's coming from the mail scan feature in your Anti-virus software. That is
    the IP number of your network card and is used by some anti-virus software
    to setup a "proxy" type server to check your email for viruses. Sometimes a
    reboot will resolve it. Otherwise you may have a configuration issue
    between your email and AV software. Check the help files for you AV
    software for the mail scan feature. If all else fails, turn off email scan.
    Mail scan is a layered type of protection, and not the final line of
    defense. Be sure you do not disable real time scan though, you'll be
    relying on that a lot without mail scan turned on.

    --

    Spider

    http://spiderathome.blogspot.com/
    http://spider1.blogspot.com/
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/24hrsupporthelpdesk

    "Simon Smith" <> wrote in message
    news:d11ba5$9hb$...
    > Can some one please tell me why the numbers 127.0.0.1 some times appear in
    > my mail settings in place of my correct email ID ?
    > These are getting changed automaticly without my permission and when it
    > happens I cant log on properly.
    > Any advice would be appreciated
    > Thanks
    >
     
    Spider, Mar 13, 2005
    #2
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  3. Simon Smith

    Dave Lear Guest

    "Simon Smith" wrote in message news:d11ba5$9hb$

    > Can some one please tell me why the numbers 127.0.0.1 some
    > times appear in my mail settings in place of my correct email ID?
    > These are getting changed automaticly without my permission
    > and when it happens I cant log on properly.


    Hi Simon.

    127.0.0.1 is the IP loopback address, i.e. the local IP address of your own
    PC.

    I suspect that your anti-virus software is making the changes. The reason
    for doing so is this...

    Without any anti-virus software installed your email client (e.g. Outlook
    Express) downloads email messages directly from your ISP's POP3 server.

    What the anti-virus software does is sit in between the email client and the
    POP3 server, acting like a proxy, and the anti-virus proxy is local to your
    PC so is on 127.0.0.1

    Your email client, instead of pointing to the ISP's POP3 server directly now
    goes via the anti-virus's proxy server on 127.0.0.1

    With this in place the email gets downloaded from the POP3 server to the
    anti-virus proxy server (running on your PC at 127.0.0.1) and checked for
    infections. If the message is clean it is then forwarded to your email
    client. If the message is infected it is blocked at the proxy, i.e. before
    it gets as far as your email client.

    Because having a proxy between the email client and the POP3 server can take
    longer to download emails than doing it directly most anti-virus software
    which does this have settings allowing you to increase the time-out
    settings.

    What anti-virus software do you have installed?
     
    Dave Lear, Mar 13, 2005
    #3
  4. Spider wrote:

    > It's coming from the mail scan feature in your Anti-virus software. That is
    > the IP number of your network card and is used by some anti-virus software


    Uh...so if a system does not have a NIC, localhost is not 127.0.0.1?

    --
    Blinky Linux Registered User 297263
    Who has implemented Usenet Solution #45933:
    Now killing all posts originating at Google Groups
     
    Blinky the Shark, Mar 13, 2005
    #4
  5. Simon Smith

    Dave Lear Guest

    Dave Lear, Mar 13, 2005
    #5
  6. Simon Smith

    why? Guest

    On Sun, 13 Mar 2005 22:54:22 -0000, Dave Lear wrote:

    >"Blinky the Shark" wrote in message
    >news:
    >
    >> Uh...so if a system does not have a NIC, localhost is not 127.0.0.1?

    >
    >No, 127.0.0.1 is always the local workstation, whether it has a NIC or not.


    How so?

    Windows -
    If there is no NIC (then most likely no TCP/IP) installed what reacts
    to IP address of 127.0.0.1? Allowing that there may be a virtual adapter
    / MS Loopback Adapter but that uses TCP/IP to respond to 127.0.0.1.

    An OS like UNIX may operate differently, such as Linux where loX is a
    valid interface as part of the OS, rather than as an add in above.

    <snip>

    Me
     
    why?, Mar 13, 2005
    #6
  7. Dave Lear wrote:

    > "Blinky the Shark" wrote in message
    > news:


    >> Uh...so if a system does not have a NIC, localhost is not 127.0.0.1?


    > No, 127.0.0.1 is always the local workstation, whether it has a NIC or not.


    I know. Someone said it was the IP of the Ethernet card. Period. I
    challenged.

    --
    Blinky Linux Registered User 297263
    Who has implemented Usenet Solution #45933:
    Now killing all posts originating at Google Groups
     
    Blinky the Shark, Mar 14, 2005
    #7
  8. Simon Smith

    Spider Guest

    If you are wanting me to say I don't know, then OK, I don't know for sure.
    I can take a guess though. Have you ever heard of a virtual adapter? AV
    software could quite easily create one if it does not exist. The bottom
    line is that the user's problem is being caused by his AV software
    regardless of his connection type.

    --

    Spider

    http://spiderathome.blogspot.com/
    http://spider1.blogspot.com/
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/24hrsupporthelpdesk

    "Blinky the Shark" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Spider wrote:
    >
    >> It's coming from the mail scan feature in your Anti-virus software. That
    >> is
    >> the IP number of your network card and is used by some anti-virus
    >> software

    >
    > Uh...so if a system does not have a NIC, localhost is not 127.0.0.1?
    >
    > --
    > Blinky Linux Registered User 297263
    > Who has implemented Usenet Solution #45933:
    > Now killing all posts originating at Google Groups
    >
     
    Spider, Mar 14, 2005
    #8
  9. Spider wrote:

    > If you are wanting me to say I don't know, then OK, I don't know for sure.


    Mostly I was saying that for all of the years before I had a NIC, my
    localhost was 127.0.0.1, and I suspect that's the norm.

    > I can take a guess though. Have you ever heard of a virtual adapter? AV


    Nope.

    > software could quite easily create one if it does not exist. The bottom
    > line is that the user's problem is being caused by his AV software
    > regardless of his connection type.


    Perhaps. I haven't been following that aspect of the conversation;
    just the part that didn't make sense.

    --
    Blinky Linux Registered User 297263
    Who has implemented Usenet Solution #45933:
    Now killing all posts originating at Google Groups
     
    Blinky the Shark, Mar 14, 2005
    #9
  10. Simon Smith

    Dave Lear Guest

    "why?" wrote in message news:

    >>> Uh...so if a system does not have a NIC, localhost is not 127.0.0.1?

    >>
    >> No, 127.0.0.1 is always the local workstation, whether it has a NIC or
    >> not.

    >
    > How so?
    >
    > Windows -
    > If there is no NIC (then most likely no TCP/IP) installed what reacts
    > to IP address of 127.0.0.1? Allowing that there may be a virtual adapter
    > / MS Loopback Adapter but that uses TCP/IP to respond to 127.0.0.1.


    It's perfectly possible for a Windows PC to have no NIC installed and yet
    have the TCP/IP protocol installed. For instance, if you had a Windows PC
    and wanted to use dial-up networking to access the internet then you'd have
    the TCP/IP protocol installed for use with the dial-up adaptor (i.e. modem).
    Until recently, when PCs came with on-board ethernet, lots of home-based PCs
    had modems and TCP/IP installed, i.e. the loopback address would respond
    without any NIC being present or required.
     
    Dave Lear, Mar 14, 2005
    #10
  11. Happened to me too, when I took a look at (installed and ran) Avast AV SW.
    It changed my mail settings.
    bOb

    "Simon Smith" <> wrote in message
    news:d11ba5$9hb$...
    > Can some one please tell me why the numbers 127.0.0.1 some times appear in
    > my mail settings in place of my correct email ID ?
    > These are getting changed automaticly without my permission and when it
    > happens I cant log on properly.
    > Any advice would be appreciated
    > Thanks
    >
    >
     
    FatBobRoundPants, Mar 14, 2005
    #11
  12. Simon Smith

    why? Guest

    On Mon, 14 Mar 2005 18:55:43 -0000, Dave Lear wrote:

    >"why?" wrote in message news:
    >
    >>>> Uh...so if a system does not have a NIC, localhost is not 127.0.0.1?
    >>>
    >>> No, 127.0.0.1 is always the local workstation, whether it has a NIC or
    >>> not.

    >>
    >> How so?
    >>
    >> Windows -
    >> If there is no NIC (then most likely no TCP/IP) installed what reacts
    >> to IP address of 127.0.0.1? Allowing that there may be a virtual adapter
    >> / MS Loopback Adapter but that uses TCP/IP to respond to 127.0.0.1.

    >
    >It's perfectly possible for a Windows PC to have no NIC installed and yet
    >have the TCP/IP protocol installed. For instance, if you had a Windows PC

    <snip>

    Urgh, I simply didn't read what you said, 'No NIC'.

    Still allows for dial up (other), which is in essence a network
    connection (non NIC but in principle a network connection) with TCP/IP
    anyway.


    Me
     
    why?, Mar 14, 2005
    #12
  13. Simon Smith

    Keme Guest

    FatBobRoundPants wrote:
    > Happened to me too, when I took a look at (installed and ran) Avast AV SW.
    > It changed my mail settings.
    > bOb
    >
    > "Simon Smith" <> wrote in message
    > news:d11ba5$9hb$...
    >
    >>Can some one please tell me why the numbers 127.0.0.1 some times appear in
    >>my mail settings in place of my correct email ID ?
    >>These are getting changed automaticly without my permission and when it
    >>happens I cant log on properly.
    >>Any advice would be appreciated
    >>Thanks
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    >

    Actually, all addresses in the 127.0.0.0/8 range (i.e. all IP addresses
    starting with "127.") are defined by IANA as loopback. Most systems use
    127.0.0.1 to refer to itself, but in theory any address is possible. In
    practice it is wise to stick to the 127... address range defined by
    IANA, though, as otherwise you'd disqualify yourself from parts of the
    internet... Got to stop now, or I'll drift seriously off topic... sorry!
     
    Keme, Mar 15, 2005
    #13
  14. Keme wrote:

    > Actually, all addresses in the 127.0.0.0/8 range (i.e. all IP
    > addresses starting with "127.") are defined by IANA as loopback. Most
    > systems use 127.0.0.1 to refer to itself, but in theory any address is
    > possible. In practice it is wise to stick to the 127... address range
    > defined by IANA, though, as otherwise you'd disqualify yourself from
    > parts of the internet... Got to stop now, or I'll drift seriously off
    > topic... sorry!


    I have (and want) my Apache server to listen to 127.0.0.1:80. But I've
    always used my hosts file as an adblock, back in the Windows Decade and
    now with Linux. So if I continue pointing ad servers to 127.0.0.1 then
    for the ads that hosts catches I get a local Apache can't-find message
    in place of the ads, because they're not at localhost. While that is at
    least not animated and brightly colored, that's not exacly ideal. :)

    In discussing this, the suggestions were to set hosts to 0.0.0.0,
    127.0.0.2 or 126.0.0.10. For each of those, there was someone saying
    "no, that's not a good idea". :) What's your take on that?

    (I've stopped using hosts, and am adblocking with the AdBlock extension
    for Firefox and with a local CSS file.)

    --
    Blinky Linux Registered User 297263
    Who has implemented Usenet Solution #45933:
    Now killing all posts originating at Google Groups
     
    Blinky the Shark, Mar 15, 2005
    #14
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