120GB hard drive is 111GB?

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Rod, Jul 14, 2003.

  1. Rod

    Rod Guest

    Probably the zillionth time this has been asked but -Why do drives sold as being a particular size show up on the
    machine as somewhat smaller. Like 30GB is around 28GB, 120GB is 111GB etc?

    Rod
     
    Rod, Jul 14, 2003
    #1
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  2. On Mon, 14 Jul 2003 18:50:42 GMT in 24hoursupport.helpdesk, my mind
    boggled at the following statement by Rod in message
    news:beuu23$95cdb$-berlin.de

    > Probably the zillionth time this has been asked but -Why do drives
    > sold as being a particular size show up on the machine as somewhat
    > smaller. Like 30GB is around 28GB, 120GB is 111GB etc?
    >
    > Rod
    >
    >
    >


    Because HD manufacturers call a gigabyte 1,000,000,000 bytes, but in the
    computer world, a gigabyte is actually 1024 x 1024 x 1024 or 1024^3 or
    1,073,741,824 bytes, which if you divide into 120,000,000,000 turns out
    to be (you guessed it), 111+ gigs.

    --
    The Old Sourdough
    No of SETI units returned: 1849
    Processing time: 3 years, 295 days, 22 hours.
    (Total hours: 33382)
    www.setiathome.ssl.berkeley.edu
     
    The Old Sourdough, Jul 14, 2003
    #2
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  3. Rod

    zaqona Guest

    "Rod" <> wrote in message
    news:beuu23$95cdb$-berlin.de...
    > Probably the zillionth time this has been asked but -Why do drives sold as

    being a particular size show up on the
    > machine as somewhat smaller. Like 30GB is around 28GB, 120GB is 111GB etc?
    >
    > Rod
    >
    > I think it's because DOS takes up the other bits.



    ---
    OK Dude
    Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    Version: 6.0.500 / Virus Database: 298 - Release Date: 10/07/2003
     
    zaqona, Jul 14, 2003
    #3
  4. Rod

    Osprey Guest

    "zaqona" <> wrote in message
    news:bev26l$9aqv9$-berlin.de...
    >
    > "Rod" <> wrote in message
    > news:beuu23$95cdb$-berlin.de...
    > > Probably the zillionth time this has been asked but -Why do drives sold

    as
    > being a particular size show up on the
    > > machine as somewhat smaller. Like 30GB is around 28GB, 120GB is 111GB

    etc?
    > >
    > > Rod
    > >
    > > I think it's because DOS takes up the other bits.


    Na! "Old s" is correct.

    Osprey
     
    Osprey, Jul 14, 2003
    #4
  5. On Mon, 14 Jul 2003 20:21:48 GMT in 24hoursupport.helpdesk, my mind
    boggled at the following statement by Osprey in message
    news:bev3c0$gll$

    >
    > "zaqona" <> wrote in message
    > news:bev26l$9aqv9$-berlin.de...
    >>
    >> "Rod" <> wrote in message
    >> news:beuu23$95cdb$-berlin.de...
    >> > Probably the zillionth time this has been asked but -Why do
    >> > drives sold

    > as
    >> being a particular size show up on the
    >> > machine as somewhat smaller. Like 30GB is around 28GB, 120GB is
    >> > 111GB

    > etc?
    >> >
    >> > Rod
    >> >
    >> > I think it's because DOS takes up the other bits.

    >
    > Na! "Old s" is correct.
    >
    > Osprey
    >
    >
    >


    Of course I'm correct! I never make mistreaks, er, misteaks..........

    --
    The Old Sourdough
    No of SETI units returned: 1849
    Processing time: 3 years, 295 days, 22 hours.
    (Total hours: 33382)
    www.setiathome.ssl.berkeley.edu
     
    The Old Sourdough, Jul 14, 2003
    #5
  6. Rod

    Richard Guest

    "Rod" <> wrote in message
    news:beuu23$95cdb$-berlin.de...
    > Probably the zillionth time this has been asked but -Why do drives sold as

    being a particular size show up on the
    > machine as somewhat smaller. Like 30GB is around 28GB, 120GB is 111GB etc?
    >
    > Rod
    >
    >


    because windows reserves a lot of space for the OS on each partition.
    the bios should report the actual size as true.
     
    Richard, Jul 15, 2003
    #6
  7. On Mon, 14 Jul 2003 15:46:35 -0500, The Old Sourdough
    <> wrote:

    >On Mon, 14 Jul 2003 20:21:48 GMT in 24hoursupport.helpdesk, my mind
    >boggled at the following statement by Osprey in message
    >news:bev3c0$gll$
    >
    >>
    >> "zaqona" <> wrote in message
    >> news:bev26l$9aqv9$-berlin.de...
    >>>
    >>> "Rod" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:beuu23$95cdb$-berlin.de...
    >>> > Probably the zillionth time this has been asked but -Why do
    >>> > drives sold

    >> as
    >>> being a particular size show up on the
    >>> > machine as somewhat smaller. Like 30GB is around 28GB, 120GB is
    >>> > 111GB

    >> etc?
    >>> >
    >>> > Rod
    >>> >
    >>> > I think it's because DOS takes up the other bits.

    >>
    >> Na! "Old s" is correct.
    >>
    >> Osprey
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    >Of course I'm correct! I never make mistreaks, er, misteaks..........


    Old Sourdough thought he made a mistake once................

    But he was wrong.
     
    Little Fish in a Big Pond, Jul 15, 2003
    #7
  8. Rod

    Tim Guest

    The Old Sourdough wrote:
    > On Mon, 14 Jul 2003 18:50:42 GMT in 24hoursupport.helpdesk, my mind
    > boggled at the following statement by Rod in message
    > news:beuu23$95cdb$-berlin.de
    >
    >> Probably the zillionth time this has been asked but -Why do drives
    >> sold as being a particular size show up on the machine as somewhat
    >> smaller. Like 30GB is around 28GB, 120GB is 111GB etc?
    >>
    >> Rod
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Because HD manufacturers call a gigabyte 1,000,000,000 bytes, but in
    > the computer world, a gigabyte is actually 1024 x 1024 x 1024 or
    > 1024^3 or 1,073,741,824 bytes, which if you divide into
    > 120,000,000,000 turns out to be (you guessed it), 111+ gigs.


    By convention this is true ... but...
    A new international standard has been adopted in the last few years, in an
    attempt to resolve confusion. This is pretty much a case of shutting the
    gate after the horse has bolted.
    A new range of prefixes has been established for binary amounts and what we
    now call a gigabyte (1,073,741,824 bytes) sould be referred to as a
    gibibyte. The new prefixes are kibi (Ki), mebi (Mi), gibi (Gi) and tebi (Ti)
    instead of kilo (k), mega (M), giga (G) and tera (T). So strictly speaking,
    by international standard 1,000,000,000 is a Gigabyte and 1,073,741,824
    bytes is a Gibibyte.
    120GB = 111.76GiB

    see: http://www.cofc.edu/~frysingj/binprefixes.html

    All the best

    Tim
     
    Tim, Jul 16, 2003
    #8
  9. What a stupid idea!

    "Tim" <> wrote in message
    news:sibRa.7078$...
    > The Old Sourdough wrote:
    > > On Mon, 14 Jul 2003 18:50:42 GMT in 24hoursupport.helpdesk, my mind
    > > boggled at the following statement by Rod in message
    > > news:beuu23$95cdb$-berlin.de
    > >
    > >> Probably the zillionth time this has been asked but -Why do drives
    > >> sold as being a particular size show up on the machine as somewhat
    > >> smaller. Like 30GB is around 28GB, 120GB is 111GB etc?
    > >>
    > >> Rod
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>

    > >
    > > Because HD manufacturers call a gigabyte 1,000,000,000 bytes, but in
    > > the computer world, a gigabyte is actually 1024 x 1024 x 1024 or
    > > 1024^3 or 1,073,741,824 bytes, which if you divide into
    > > 120,000,000,000 turns out to be (you guessed it), 111+ gigs.

    >
    > By convention this is true ... but...
    > A new international standard has been adopted in the last few years, in an
    > attempt to resolve confusion. This is pretty much a case of shutting the
    > gate after the horse has bolted.
    > A new range of prefixes has been established for binary amounts and what

    we
    > now call a gigabyte (1,073,741,824 bytes) sould be referred to as a
    > gibibyte. The new prefixes are kibi (Ki), mebi (Mi), gibi (Gi) and tebi

    (Ti)
    > instead of kilo (k), mega (M), giga (G) and tera (T). So strictly

    speaking,
    > by international standard 1,000,000,000 is a Gigabyte and 1,073,741,824
    > bytes is a Gibibyte.
    > 120GB = 111.76GiB
    >
    > see: http://www.cofc.edu/~frysingj/binprefixes.html
    >
    > All the best
    >
    > Tim
    >
    >
     
    BananaPannaPoe, Jul 16, 2003
    #9
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