1.0 mB Floppy disks

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by John Rampling, Aug 17, 2004.

  1. I've got these old 1.0 mB (720 kB actual data capacity) floppy disks that I
    kept for a few years in case they came in useful. After all, if I only want
    to post a simple Word document to someone, it seems wasteful to spend a lot
    of money on expensive modern 1.44 mB disks when these older disks are still
    serviceable. (Cue background noise of computer bores mumbling "Call that
    old? I remember when 320 kB floppies were the latest thing . . . they really
    were floppy in those days too . . . none of these modern rigid cases etc . .
    .. blether . . .blether. . ."

    Thing is, my new computer will not read them. Nor can I format them, because
    WinXP only seems to offer the option of 1.44 mB.

    Now don't trouble yourselves telling me clever ways of recovering the lost
    data etc - I have already thrown them into the dustbin (sorry, trash can).
    My question is, are these disks now officially obsolete? and when did it
    happen?

    John
     
    John Rampling, Aug 17, 2004
    #1
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  2. John Rampling

    Spajky Guest

    On Tue, 17 Aug 2004 09:58:25 GMT, "John Rampling"
    <> wrote:

    >I've got these old 1.0 mB (720 kB actual data capacity) floppy disks


    >Thing is, my new computer will not read them. Nor can I format them, because
    >WinXP only seems to offer the option of 1.44 mB.


    IMHO this a new feature of winXP!
    (can not read also 1,7 dmf MS own format FDs)

    no problem with W9x ! :)
    --
    Regards, SPAJKY ®
    & visit my site @ http://www.spajky.vze.com
    "Tualatin OC-ed / BX-Slot1 / inaudible setup!"
    E-mail AntiSpam: remove ##
     
    Spajky, Aug 17, 2004
    #2
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  3. John Rampling wrote:
    > I've got these old 1.0 mB (720 kB actual data capacity) floppy disks
    > that I kept for a few years in case they came in useful. After all,
    > if I only want to post a simple Word document to someone, it seems
    > wasteful to spend a lot of money on expensive modern 1.44 mB disks
    > when these older disks are still serviceable


    zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
     
    Hawajakaa Atanifanya, Aug 17, 2004
    #3
  4. John Rampling

    Thor Guest

    "John Rampling" <> wrote in message
    news:5FkUc.62$...
    > I've got these old 1.0 mB (720 kB actual data capacity) floppy disks that

    I
    > kept for a few years in case they came in useful. After all, if I only

    want
    > to post a simple Word document to someone, it seems wasteful to spend a

    lot
    > of money on expensive modern 1.44 mB disks when these older disks are

    still
    > serviceable. (Cue background noise of computer bores mumbling "Call that
    > old? I remember when 320 kB floppies were the latest thing . . . they

    really
    > were floppy in those days too . . . none of these modern rigid cases etc .

    ..
    > . blether . . .blether. . ."
    >
    > Thing is, my new computer will not read them. Nor can I format them,

    because
    > WinXP only seems to offer the option of 1.44 mB.
    >
    > Now don't trouble yourselves telling me clever ways of recovering the lost
    > data etc - I have already thrown them into the dustbin (sorry, trash can).
    > My question is, are these disks now officially obsolete? and when did it
    > happen?


    Christ! are you really that much of a tightwad that you can't bear the
    thought of throwing out those 720k disks? Pitch those 720K dinosaurs for
    crying out loud! They aren't worth the fuss. 1.44MB diskettes aren't
    expensive, and haven't been for many years. Hell, I wouldn't even bother
    using the 1.44s. Just use a CDRW disk, to tote your casual files around.
    Your new computer more than likely has a CDRW drive.
     
    Thor, Aug 17, 2004
    #4
  5. "Thor" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > Christ! are you really that much of a tightwad that you can't bear the
    > thought of throwing out those 720k disks? Pitch those 720K dinosaurs for
    > crying out loud! They aren't worth the fuss. 1.44MB diskettes aren't
    > expensive, and haven't been for many years. Hell, I wouldn't even bother
    > using the 1.44s. Just use a CDRW disk, to tote your casual files around.
    > Your new computer more than likely has a CDRW drive.
    >


    Pity about you, Thor. I always thought you had a sense of humour. I seem to
    have been wrong.
     
    John Rampling, Aug 17, 2004
    #5
  6. John Rampling

    Thor Guest

    "John Rampling" <> wrote in message
    news:80rUc.2785$%%...
    >
    > "Thor" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > >
    > > Christ! are you really that much of a tightwad that you can't bear the
    > > thought of throwing out those 720k disks? Pitch those 720K dinosaurs for
    > > crying out loud! They aren't worth the fuss. 1.44MB diskettes aren't
    > > expensive, and haven't been for many years. Hell, I wouldn't even bother
    > > using the 1.44s. Just use a CDRW disk, to tote your casual files around.
    > > Your new computer more than likely has a CDRW drive.
    > >

    >
    > Pity about you, Thor. I always thought you had a sense of humour. I seem

    to
    > have been wrong.


    If you were being facetious, then I missed your attempt at levity and I
    apologize. Sometimes it helps to put a little ;) on your statements when
    kidding around, John. It seemed to me that you were completely serious about
    not wanting to get rid of a batch of 720k disks. I've seen stranger
    attitudes on Usenet, so it didn't strike me as obvious that you were
    kidding.
     
    Thor, Aug 17, 2004
    #6
  7. John Rampling

    Jerry G. Guest

    I've been hearing that in a few years, a floppy drive will no longer be
    standard with a computer. It will be an extra add-on. The floppy drive is
    more like an extra utility.

    You can almost get a small flash card for the price of a box of floppies a
    few years ago. The reader/writer is the same price as a floppy drive. I am
    now using 16 and 32 mb flashcards instead of floppies. I also have a few at
    256 mb and larger, for the larger files. I only burn CD disks of the files
    that I want to keep permanently.

    --

    Jerry G.
    ==========================


    "John Rampling" <> wrote in message
    news:5FkUc.62$...
    I've got these old 1.0 mB (720 kB actual data capacity) floppy disks that I
    kept for a few years in case they came in useful. After all, if I only want
    to post a simple Word document to someone, it seems wasteful to spend a lot
    of money on expensive modern 1.44 mB disks when these older disks are still
    serviceable. (Cue background noise of computer bores mumbling "Call that
    old? I remember when 320 kB floppies were the latest thing . . . they really
    were floppy in those days too . . . none of these modern rigid cases etc . .
    .. blether . . .blether. . ."

    Thing is, my new computer will not read them. Nor can I format them, because
    WinXP only seems to offer the option of 1.44 mB.

    Now don't trouble yourselves telling me clever ways of recovering the lost
    data etc - I have already thrown them into the dustbin (sorry, trash can).
    My question is, are these disks now officially obsolete? and when did it
    happen?

    John
     
    Jerry G., Aug 17, 2004
    #7
  8. John Rampling

    George Guest

    "Thor" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "John Rampling" <> wrote in message
    > news:80rUc.2785$%%...
    > >
    > > "Thor" <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > > >
    > > > Christ! are you really that much of a tightwad that you can't bear the
    > > > thought of throwing out those 720k disks? Pitch those 720K dinosaurs

    for
    > > > crying out loud! They aren't worth the fuss. 1.44MB diskettes aren't
    > > > expensive, and haven't been for many years. Hell, I wouldn't even

    bother
    > > > using the 1.44s. Just use a CDRW disk, to tote your casual files

    around.
    > > > Your new computer more than likely has a CDRW drive.
    > > >

    > >
    > > Pity about you, Thor. I always thought you had a sense of humour. I

    seem
    > to
    > > have been wrong.

    >
    > If you were being facetious, then I missed your attempt at levity and I
    > apologize. Sometimes it helps to put a little ;) on your statements when
    > kidding around, John. It seemed to me that you were completely serious

    about
    > not wanting to get rid of a batch of 720k disks. I've seen stranger
    > attitudes on Usenet, so it didn't strike me as obvious that you were
    > kidding.
    >
    >

    I know what you mean...I am STILL ticked that I cannot use my RX02 DEC
    floppies
    on my PC. I guess nobody ever bothered to interface a Shugart 800 drive to
    a PC. ;)
     
    George, Aug 18, 2004
    #8
  9. "Thor" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > If you were being facetious, then I missed your attempt at levity and I
    > apologize. Sometimes it helps to put a little ;) on your statements when
    > kidding around, John. It seemed to me that you were completely serious
    > about
    > not wanting to get rid of a batch of 720k disks. I've seen stranger
    > attitudes on Usenet, so it didn't strike me as obvious that you were
    > kidding.
    >


    Thank you for your gracious reply. But it is premature to throw out the 1.44
    mB floppies just yet. They remain vastly superior to CDs in terms of
    convenience and reusability, at least for the sending of small files. When
    we have a common standard for CD and CDRW protocols then perhaps the FD can
    be consigned to history, but not for a while yet.

    John

    Oh yes - I mustn't forget the ;-)
     
    John Rampling, Aug 18, 2004
    #9
  10. John Rampling

    Ardent Guest

    On Tue, 17 Aug 2004 09:58:25 GMT, "John Rampling"
    <> wrote:

    >I've got these old 1.0 mB (720 kB actual data capacity) floppy disks that I


    I do not know whether this will work but worth a try.

    You will have a hole at bottom left which can be closed with the
    slider to write protect the disc.

    Now make a similar hole, round hole will do, at the bottom right of
    the floppy. You will not damage the disc inside but do not use too
    much pressure.

    Now try to format in the xp machine and post the results here.

    --
    Sandy Archer
    Reply to newsgroups only
     
    Ardent, Aug 22, 2004
    #10
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