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Another net

 
 
PeterN
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Posts: n/a
 
      01-24-2014
On 1/24/2014 10:11 AM, Mayayana wrote:
> | As a point of interest, but not intended as a point of contention,
> | that tool in your tutorial is called a crescent wrench in the US and
> | a monkey wrench in other countries.
> |
> | A monkey wrench in the US looks like this: http://tinyurl.com/9m2w7dw
> | It's also called a "pipe wrench" here. The monkey wrench has notched
> | and gripping jaws, but our Crescent wrench has smooth jaws.
> |
> | The US use of "crescent wrench" is from the popularity of the tool
> | when introduced here, and made by, the Crescent company. Using the
> | tool company's name for the tool is similar to calling an adjustable
> | spanner a Bahco after Johan Johansson's company.
> |
>
> I know his wrench as an "adjustable wrench" and
> think of a crescent wrench as a non-adjustable
> "spanner". But when I looked it up I see you're correct.
> I've never used the word spanner. But like you I do
> know monkey wrench as a synonym for pipe wrench.
>
> I guess that's all OK, just so long as you don't
> drink "soda" or "pop" instead of "tonic".


Tanqueray goes well with tonic, provided ther is a lime on the glass.

>
> http://www4.uwm.edu/FLL/linguistics/dialect/maps.html
>
>

BTW, do monkeys pick their nuts with a monkey wrench?

--
PeterN
 
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Tony Cooper
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Posts: n/a
 
      01-24-2014
On Fri, 24 Jan 2014 10:22:29 -0500, PeterN
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>On 1/24/2014 9:16 AM, Tony Cooper wrote:
>> On 24 Jan 2014 08:57:53 GMT, Sandman <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>>> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Tony Cooper wrote:
>>>
>>>>>> Tony Cooper:
>>>>>> Another statue from the Albin Polasek Museum and Sculpture
>>>>>> Garden placed in a setting that the statue's pose seemed to
>>>>>> suggest. This one was a bit more difficult since the statue's
>>>>>> arm had to be re-positioned to accommodate the racket. I don't
>>>>>> have the racket positioned right in his hand, though.
>>>>>
>>>>>> I have too much time on my hands.
>>>>>
>>>>>> http://tonycooper.smugmug.com/Curren...-01-19B-X2.jpg
>>>>>
>>>>> Ron:
>>>>> Too much time, yes. But while you're at it, make him cast a shadow
>>>>> on the court and you'll really have something. Very cute.
>>>>
>>>> I posted this at Dgrin and the same comment was made. I've never
>>>> tried adding a shadow, but there are tutorials on it. I'm not going
>>>> to bother for something like this, but I would if I was trying to
>>>> create a realistic scene.
>>>
>>> Here's a tutorial I wrote on the subject way back:
>>>
>>> http://sandman.net/pages/3dskuggorMedPhotoshop?lang=en

>>
>> Thanks. That's a well-presented tutorial. Good job.
>>
>> Unless I get extremely bored this afternoon, I'm not going to try to
>> create a shadow for this composite. It was just a little exercise in
>> making some rather dull shots into something a little more
>> interesting.
>>
>> I bought an inexpensive video camera yesterday so my grandchildren can
>> make movies, and I'm into a new project now: working with a software
>> program to edit the movies.
>>
>> As a point of interest, but not intended as a point of contention,
>> that tool in your tutorial is called a crescent wrench in the US and
>> a monkey wrench in other countries.
>>
>> A monkey wrench in the US looks like this: http://tinyurl.com/9m2w7dw
>> It's also called a "pipe wrench" here. The monkey wrench has notched
>> and gripping jaws, but our Crescent wrench has smooth jaws.
>>
>> The US use of "crescent wrench" is from the popularity of the tool
>> when introduced here, and made by, the Crescent company. Using the
>> tool company's name for the tool is similar to calling an adjustable
>> spanner a Bahco after Johan Johansson's company.
>>

>
>I filled multiple roles in my Army reserve unit, including motor
>sergeant. I once drove the lieutenant crazy when I requested that he
>requisition a left handed crescent wrench.
>BTW as much as I dislike Jonas's trolling, in this case he tried to be
>helpful, and your comment was unnecessary.


I suggest you re-read what I wrote. I made a point of saying I was
not intending to be contentious. I also made it clear that the tool
is called one thing in this country, and another thing in Europe.
He is correct for his usage, and I did not correct him for not using
the term used in this country.

I also thanked him for providing the tutorial and complimented the
presentation.

The "go get a left-handed..." is used in most, if not all,
English-speaking countries. In the UK, it's "go get a left-handed
spanner". I've also heard "go get a left-handed monkey wrench".



--
Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
 
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J. Clarke
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Posts: n/a
 
      01-24-2014
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) says...
>
> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Tony Cooper wrote:
>
> > As a point of interest, but not intended as a point of contention,
> > that tool in your tutorial is called a crescent wrench in the US
> > and a monkey wrench in other countries.

>
> Oh, I didn't know that. Thanks


It's actually more complicated than that.

The original "monkey wrench" was like this:
<http://search.yahoo.com/search?p=monkey+wrench&ei=UTF-8&fr=moz35>

Note that the jaws do bear some resemblance to a rather stylized drawing
of a monkey.

Later there were two developments, the Crescent wrench, like the one
that you used, that is more compact and can be used with one hand, and
the Stillson wrench <http://www.hisltd.co.uk/Rothenberger-Stillson-Pipe-
Wrench.html> that is designed for gripping pipe and other round stock
but has a superficial similarity of appearance.

The Crescent would get the "monkey wrench" appellation due to similarity
of function to the original, while the Stillson would get it due to
similarity of appearance.

The original "monkey wrench" has pretty much fallen into disuse in the
US, and the Crescent-type wrench is generally called a "Crescent
wrench", leaving the Stillson to be called a "monkey wrench" on
occasion, however "pipe wrench" is a less ambiguous term.

 
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J. Clarke
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-24-2014
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, tonycooper214
@gmail.com says...
>
> On Fri, 24 Jan 2014 10:22:29 -0500, PeterN
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
> >On 1/24/2014 9:16 AM, Tony Cooper wrote:
> >> On 24 Jan 2014 08:57:53 GMT, Sandman <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> >>
> >>> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Tony Cooper wrote:
> >>>
> >>>>>> Tony Cooper:
> >>>>>> Another statue from the Albin Polasek Museum and Sculpture
> >>>>>> Garden placed in a setting that the statue's pose seemed to
> >>>>>> suggest. This one was a bit more difficult since the statue's
> >>>>>> arm had to be re-positioned to accommodate the racket. I don't
> >>>>>> have the racket positioned right in his hand, though.
> >>>>>
> >>>>>> I have too much time on my hands.
> >>>>>
> >>>>>> http://tonycooper.smugmug.com/Curren...-01-19B-X2.jpg
> >>>>>
> >>>>> Ron:
> >>>>> Too much time, yes. But while you're at it, make him cast a shadow
> >>>>> on the court and you'll really have something. Very cute.
> >>>>
> >>>> I posted this at Dgrin and the same comment was made. I've never
> >>>> tried adding a shadow, but there are tutorials on it. I'm not going
> >>>> to bother for something like this, but I would if I was trying to
> >>>> create a realistic scene.
> >>>
> >>> Here's a tutorial I wrote on the subject way back:
> >>>
> >>> http://sandman.net/pages/3dskuggorMedPhotoshop?lang=en
> >>
> >> Thanks. That's a well-presented tutorial. Good job.
> >>
> >> Unless I get extremely bored this afternoon, I'm not going to try to
> >> create a shadow for this composite. It was just a little exercise in
> >> making some rather dull shots into something a little more
> >> interesting.
> >>
> >> I bought an inexpensive video camera yesterday so my grandchildren can
> >> make movies, and I'm into a new project now: working with a software
> >> program to edit the movies.
> >>
> >> As a point of interest, but not intended as a point of contention,
> >> that tool in your tutorial is called a crescent wrench in the US and
> >> a monkey wrench in other countries.
> >>
> >> A monkey wrench in the US looks like this: http://tinyurl.com/9m2w7dw
> >> It's also called a "pipe wrench" here. The monkey wrench has notched
> >> and gripping jaws, but our Crescent wrench has smooth jaws.
> >>
> >> The US use of "crescent wrench" is from the popularity of the tool
> >> when introduced here, and made by, the Crescent company. Using the
> >> tool company's name for the tool is similar to calling an adjustable
> >> spanner a Bahco after Johan Johansson's company.
> >>

> >
> >I filled multiple roles in my Army reserve unit, including motor
> >sergeant. I once drove the lieutenant crazy when I requested that he
> >requisition a left handed crescent wrench.
> >BTW as much as I dislike Jonas's trolling, in this case he tried to be
> >helpful, and your comment was unnecessary.

>
> I suggest you re-read what I wrote. I made a point of saying I was
> not intending to be contentious. I also made it clear that the tool
> is called one thing in this country, and another thing in Europe.
> He is correct for his usage, and I did not correct him for not using
> the term used in this country.
>
> I also thanked him for providing the tutorial and complimented the
> presentation.
>
> The "go get a left-handed..." is used in most, if not all,
> English-speaking countries. In the UK, it's "go get a left-handed
> spanner". I've also heard "go get a left-handed monkey wrench".


Believe it or not, there is a such a thing as a left-handed Crescent
wrench. The adjuster had a reverse thread. Whether this is due to
Chinese incompetence or to intent I have no idea.
 
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Sandman
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Posts: n/a
 
      01-24-2014
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, J. Clarke wrote:

> > > Tony Cooper:
> > > As a point of interest, but not intended as a point of
> > > contention, that tool in your tutorial is called a crescent
> > > wrench in the US and a monkey wrench in other countries.

> >
> > Sandman:
> > Oh, I didn't know that. Thanks

>
> It's actually more complicated than that.


> The original "monkey wrench" was like this:
> <http://search.yahoo.com/search?p=monkey+wrench&ei=UTF-8&fr=moz35>


> Note that the jaws do bear some resemblance to a rather stylized
> drawing of a monkey.


The URL was to just a general search on Yahoo, which may or may not show
the same items for me as for you. The only resemblence I found was this
image:

http://tinyurl.com/phvzz7o

Which, incidentally, is of the kind of wrench I used in my tutorial.

> Later there were two developments, the Crescent wrench, like the one
> that you used, that is more compact and can be used with one hand,
> and the Stillson wrench
> <http://www.hisltd.co.uk/Rothenberger-Stillson-Pipe-
> Wrench.html>that is designed for gripping pipe and other round stock
> but has a superficial similarity of appearance.


> The Crescent would get the "monkey wrench" appellation due to
> similarity of function to the original, while the Stillson would get
> it due to similarity of appearance.


I'm not arguing with that, but I fail to see the similarities between the
Stillson and a monkey, but I suppose I'm just missing something obvious

> The original "monkey wrench" has pretty much fallen into disuse in
> the US, and the Crescent-type wrench is generally called a "Crescent
> wrench", leaving the Stillson to be called a "monkey wrench" on
> occasion, however "pipe wrench" is a less ambiguous term.


While I'm sure it's used here in Sweden, I think a more common wrench is
what we call Rörtång, or "pipe pliers", which look like this:

http://tinyurl.com/npmrq4d

As you can see, it has a similar funciton to what you call monkey
wrench.

--
Sandman[.net]
 
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Tony Cooper
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-24-2014
On Fri, 24 Jan 2014 11:15:23 -0500, "J. Clarke"
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, tonycooper214
>@gmail.com says...
>>
>> On Fri, 24 Jan 2014 10:22:29 -0500, PeterN
>> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>> >On 1/24/2014 9:16 AM, Tony Cooper wrote:
>> >> On 24 Jan 2014 08:57:53 GMT, Sandman <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> >>
>> >>> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Tony Cooper wrote:
>> >>>
>> >>>>>> Tony Cooper:
>> >>>>>> Another statue from the Albin Polasek Museum and Sculpture
>> >>>>>> Garden placed in a setting that the statue's pose seemed to
>> >>>>>> suggest. This one was a bit more difficult since the statue's
>> >>>>>> arm had to be re-positioned to accommodate the racket. I don't
>> >>>>>> have the racket positioned right in his hand, though.
>> >>>>>
>> >>>>>> I have too much time on my hands.
>> >>>>>
>> >>>>>> http://tonycooper.smugmug.com/Curren...-01-19B-X2.jpg
>> >>>>>
>> >>>>> Ron:
>> >>>>> Too much time, yes. But while you're at it, make him cast a shadow
>> >>>>> on the court and you'll really have something. Very cute.
>> >>>>
>> >>>> I posted this at Dgrin and the same comment was made. I've never
>> >>>> tried adding a shadow, but there are tutorials on it. I'm not going
>> >>>> to bother for something like this, but I would if I was trying to
>> >>>> create a realistic scene.
>> >>>
>> >>> Here's a tutorial I wrote on the subject way back:
>> >>>
>> >>> http://sandman.net/pages/3dskuggorMedPhotoshop?lang=en
>> >>
>> >> Thanks. That's a well-presented tutorial. Good job.
>> >>
>> >> Unless I get extremely bored this afternoon, I'm not going to try to
>> >> create a shadow for this composite. It was just a little exercise in
>> >> making some rather dull shots into something a little more
>> >> interesting.
>> >>
>> >> I bought an inexpensive video camera yesterday so my grandchildren can
>> >> make movies, and I'm into a new project now: working with a software
>> >> program to edit the movies.
>> >>
>> >> As a point of interest, but not intended as a point of contention,
>> >> that tool in your tutorial is called a crescent wrench in the US and
>> >> a monkey wrench in other countries.
>> >>
>> >> A monkey wrench in the US looks like this: http://tinyurl.com/9m2w7dw
>> >> It's also called a "pipe wrench" here. The monkey wrench has notched
>> >> and gripping jaws, but our Crescent wrench has smooth jaws.
>> >>
>> >> The US use of "crescent wrench" is from the popularity of the tool
>> >> when introduced here, and made by, the Crescent company. Using the
>> >> tool company's name for the tool is similar to calling an adjustable
>> >> spanner a Bahco after Johan Johansson's company.
>> >>
>> >
>> >I filled multiple roles in my Army reserve unit, including motor
>> >sergeant. I once drove the lieutenant crazy when I requested that he
>> >requisition a left handed crescent wrench.
>> >BTW as much as I dislike Jonas's trolling, in this case he tried to be
>> >helpful, and your comment was unnecessary.

>>
>> I suggest you re-read what I wrote. I made a point of saying I was
>> not intending to be contentious. I also made it clear that the tool
>> is called one thing in this country, and another thing in Europe.
>> He is correct for his usage, and I did not correct him for not using
>> the term used in this country.
>>
>> I also thanked him for providing the tutorial and complimented the
>> presentation.
>>
>> The "go get a left-handed..." is used in most, if not all,
>> English-speaking countries. In the UK, it's "go get a left-handed
>> spanner". I've also heard "go get a left-handed monkey wrench".

>
>Believe it or not, there is a such a thing as a left-handed Crescent
>wrench. The adjuster had a reverse thread. Whether this is due to
>Chinese incompetence or to intent I have no idea.


I am left-handed, but the only left-handed tool that I use is my
Skilsaw (circular saw) because I move it with my left hand and want
the line I'm cutting on to be visible. With a standard, or
right-handed, circular saw the line is covered by the plate if I move
the saw with my left hand.

I have no problem using a standard crescent or pipe wrench, and no
problem using standard scissors. With scissors, I've learned to
adjust my thumb pressure to keep the blades in contact. I've tried
left-handed scissors, but they're awkward for me because I have to
re-adjust the thumb pressure.

I spent my working career in the specialty medical equipment field.
They do make left-handed hemostats and needle holders, but I never had
a call for them. A hemostat or a needle holder has a ratchet-lock
that is designed for right-handers, but it's easy to adjust to that
thumb pressure that pushes instead of pulls.


--
Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
 
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Hactar
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-24-2014
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
PeterN <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> On 1/24/2014 9:16 AM, Tony Cooper wrote:
> >
> > As a point of interest, but not intended as a point of contention,
> > that tool in your tutorial is called a crescent wrench in the US and
> > a monkey wrench in other countries.
> >
> > A monkey wrench in the US looks like this: http://tinyurl.com/9m2w7dw
> > It's also called a "pipe wrench" here. The monkey wrench has notched
> > and gripping jaws, but our Crescent wrench has smooth jaws.
> >
> > The US use of "crescent wrench" is from the popularity of the tool
> > when introduced here, and made by, the Crescent company. Using the
> > tool company's name for the tool is similar to calling an adjustable
> > spanner a Bahco after Johan Johansson's company.

>
> I filled multiple roles in my Army reserve unit, including motor
> sergeant. I once drove the lieutenant crazy when I requested that he
> requisition a left handed crescent wrench.


A left-handed monkey/crescent/adjustable/pipe wrench is theoretically
possible by having a left-handed thread on the adjuster. I've never seen
or heard of one outside of a joke, but there it is. A left-handed Allen
wrench or striped paint, I don't think so.

--
-eben (E-Mail Removed) royalty.mine.nu:81
LIBRA: A big promotion is just around the corner for someone
much more talented than you. Laughter is the very best medicine,
remember that when your appendix bursts next week. -- Weird Al
 
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PeterN
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-24-2014
On 1/24/2014 3:57 AM, Sandman wrote:
> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Tony Cooper wrote:
>
>>>> Tony Cooper:
>>>> Another statue from the Albin Polasek Museum and Sculpture
>>>> Garden placed in a setting that the statue's pose seemed to
>>>> suggest. This one was a bit more difficult since the statue's
>>>> arm had to be re-positioned to accommodate the racket. I don't
>>>> have the racket positioned right in his hand, though.
>>>
>>>> I have too much time on my hands.
>>>
>>>> http://tonycooper.smugmug.com/Curren...-01-19B-X2.jpg
>>>
>>> Ron:
>>> Too much time, yes. But while you're at it, make him cast a shadow
>>> on the court and you'll really have something. Very cute.

>>
>> I posted this at Dgrin and the same comment was made. I've never
>> tried adding a shadow, but there are tutorials on it. I'm not going
>> to bother for something like this, but I would if I was trying to
>> create a realistic scene.

>
> Here's a tutorial I wrote on the subject way back:
>
> http://sandman.net/pages/3dskuggorMedPhotoshop?lang=en
>
>


that's a decent way.

--
PeterN
 
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PeterN
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-24-2014
On 1/24/2014 10:59 AM, Tony Cooper wrote:
> On Fri, 24 Jan 2014 10:22:29 -0500, PeterN
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> On 1/24/2014 9:16 AM, Tony Cooper wrote:
>>> On 24 Jan 2014 08:57:53 GMT, Sandman <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>
>>>> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Tony Cooper wrote:
>>>>
>>>>>>> Tony Cooper:
>>>>>>> Another statue from the Albin Polasek Museum and Sculpture
>>>>>>> Garden placed in a setting that the statue's pose seemed to
>>>>>>> suggest. This one was a bit more difficult since the statue's
>>>>>>> arm had to be re-positioned to accommodate the racket. I don't
>>>>>>> have the racket positioned right in his hand, though.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> I have too much time on my hands.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> http://tonycooper.smugmug.com/Curren...-01-19B-X2.jpg
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Ron:
>>>>>> Too much time, yes. But while you're at it, make him cast a shadow
>>>>>> on the court and you'll really have something. Very cute.
>>>>>
>>>>> I posted this at Dgrin and the same comment was made. I've never
>>>>> tried adding a shadow, but there are tutorials on it. I'm not going
>>>>> to bother for something like this, but I would if I was trying to
>>>>> create a realistic scene.
>>>>
>>>> Here's a tutorial I wrote on the subject way back:
>>>>
>>>> http://sandman.net/pages/3dskuggorMedPhotoshop?lang=en
>>>
>>> Thanks. That's a well-presented tutorial. Good job.
>>>
>>> Unless I get extremely bored this afternoon, I'm not going to try to
>>> create a shadow for this composite. It was just a little exercise in
>>> making some rather dull shots into something a little more
>>> interesting.
>>>
>>> I bought an inexpensive video camera yesterday so my grandchildren can
>>> make movies, and I'm into a new project now: working with a software
>>> program to edit the movies.
>>>
>>> As a point of interest, but not intended as a point of contention,
>>> that tool in your tutorial is called a crescent wrench in the US and
>>> a monkey wrench in other countries.
>>>
>>> A monkey wrench in the US looks like this: http://tinyurl.com/9m2w7dw
>>> It's also called a "pipe wrench" here. The monkey wrench has notched
>>> and gripping jaws, but our Crescent wrench has smooth jaws.
>>>
>>> The US use of "crescent wrench" is from the popularity of the tool
>>> when introduced here, and made by, the Crescent company. Using the
>>> tool company's name for the tool is similar to calling an adjustable
>>> spanner a Bahco after Johan Johansson's company.
>>>

>>
>> I filled multiple roles in my Army reserve unit, including motor
>> sergeant. I once drove the lieutenant crazy when I requested that he
>> requisition a left handed crescent wrench.
>> BTW as much as I dislike Jonas's trolling, in this case he tried to be
>> helpful, and your comment was unnecessary.

>
> I suggest you re-read what I wrote. I made a point of saying I was
> not intending to be contentious. I also made it clear that the tool
> is called one thing in this country, and another thing in Europe.
> He is correct for his usage, and I did not correct him for not using
> the term used in this country.
>
> I also thanked him for providing the tutorial and complimented the
> presentation.


I am happy that it was taken as intended. There has been too much here
that has not been.

>
> The "go get a left-handed..." is used in most, if not all,
> English-speaking countries. In the UK, it's "go get a left-handed
> spanner". I've also heard "go get a left-handed monkey wrench".
>
>
>



--
PeterN
 
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Tony Cooper
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-25-2014
On Sat, 25 Jan 2014 12:20:20 +1300, Eric Stevens
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>On Fri, 24 Jan 2014 09:16:39 -0500, Tony Cooper
><(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>>On 24 Jan 2014 08:57:53 GMT, Sandman <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>>>In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Tony Cooper wrote:
>>>
>>>> > > Tony Cooper:
>>>> > > Another statue from the Albin Polasek Museum and Sculpture
>>>> > > Garden placed in a setting that the statue's pose seemed to
>>>> > > suggest. This one was a bit more difficult since the statue's
>>>> > > arm had to be re-positioned to accommodate the racket. I don't
>>>> > > have the racket positioned right in his hand, though.
>>>> >
>>>> > > I have too much time on my hands.
>>>> >
>>>> > > http://tonycooper.smugmug.com/Curren...-01-19B-X2.jpg
>>>> >
>>>> > Ron:
>>>> > Too much time, yes. But while you're at it, make him cast a shadow
>>>> > on the court and you'll really have something. Very cute.
>>>>
>>>> I posted this at Dgrin and the same comment was made. I've never
>>>> tried adding a shadow, but there are tutorials on it. I'm not going
>>>> to bother for something like this, but I would if I was trying to
>>>> create a realistic scene.
>>>
>>>Here's a tutorial I wrote on the subject way back:
>>>
>>>http://sandman.net/pages/3dskuggorMedPhotoshop?lang=en

>>
>>Thanks. That's a well-presented tutorial. Good job.
>>
>>Unless I get extremely bored this afternoon, I'm not going to try to
>>create a shadow for this composite. It was just a little exercise in
>>making some rather dull shots into something a little more
>>interesting.
>>
>>I bought an inexpensive video camera yesterday so my grandchildren can
>>make movies, and I'm into a new project now: working with a software
>>program to edit the movies.
>>
>>As a point of interest, but not intended as a point of contention,
>>that tool in your tutorial is called a crescent wrench in the US and
>>a monkey wrench in other countries.

>
> ... some other countries, perhaps. But
>http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Fi..._1903_p172.png
>is the style of the original monkey wrench and
>http://walkingdead.wikia.com/wiki/Fi...key_Wrench.jpg is the style
>of wrench to which the name has become attached.
>>
>>A monkey wrench in the US looks like this: http://tinyurl.com/9m2w7dw

>
>Nope. That's a Stillson wrench, designed for gripping pipe. See
>http://inventors.about.com/library/i...s/blwrench.htm



It isn't what it *is*, it's what it's *called*. In the US, if you
want to buy one of these, and go into a hardware store, you'd ask for
a "monkey wrench" or a "pipe wrench". Some hardware store clerks
would know "Stillson wrench", but some wouldn't.

Terms change from country to country. We take the elevator, someone
in the UK takes the lift. We enter a building on the first floor,
someone in the UK goes up a flight to the first floor.

>
>>It's also called a "pipe wrench" here. The monkey wrench has notched
>>and gripping jaws, but our Crescent wrench has smooth jaws.
>>
>>The US use of "crescent wrench" is from the popularity of the tool
>>when introduced here, and made by, the Crescent company. Using the
>>tool company's name for the tool is similar to calling an adjustable
>>spanner a Bahco after Johan Johansson's company.

--
Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
 
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