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Some advice for an HTML novice please

 
 
Gordon Levi
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      12-06-2013
A friend is currently constructing his own web site. He programs
process control computers for a living so he is not going to have
trouble understanding CSS and HTML. I would like to point him to a
short document that explains the basics and prevents him making the
classic errors. Any suggestions?
 
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j
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      12-06-2013
On 12/6/2013 9:00 AM, Gordon Levi wrote:
> A friend is currently constructing his own web site. He programs
> process control computers for a living so he is not going to have
> trouble understanding CSS and HTML. I would like to point him to a
> short document that explains the basics and prevents him making the
> classic errors. Any suggestions?


I'm not the best source for these, but I have few to get started.
>

Yukka has this:

http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/www.html

Which explains in some technical detail some of the whys and why not.

The ultimate reference is here:

http://www.w3.org/community/webed/wiki/HTML

I've found the info here to be good,although I have never looked through
the site. Just when I hit a Google reference to there that the info is good:

http://css-tricks.com/

I don't have a reference to Dorayme's work, but she has a lot on floats
and many other topics. Dorayme?

Just because you find your html/css works doesn't mean it will work in
another browser. This is the resource for that:

http://caniuse.com/

You'll find a lot of references to W3 Schools. Unfortunately there is a
lot of bad information there. Stay away.

Certainly there are others...

Jeff
 
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Christoph Michael Becker
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      12-06-2013
Gordon Levi wrote:

> A friend is currently constructing his own web site. He programs
> process control computers for a living so he is not going to have
> trouble understanding CSS and HTML. I would like to point him to a
> short document that explains the basics and prevents him making the
> classic errors. Any suggestions?


Did your friend consider using a content management system for this purpose?

--
Christoph M. Becker
 
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dorayme
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      12-07-2013
In article <l7solv$kb8$(E-Mail Removed)>, j <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

> I don't have a reference to Dorayme's work, but she has a lot on floats
> and many other topics. Dorayme?


You talking to me?

I am dorayme, if I ever get my hands on Dorayme, I will ... I will ...
O... I dunno... have a drink with it maybe and tell it to bugger off
and stop confusing folks. <g>

Just a few random thoughts:

I have a piece on floats at

<http://netweaver.com.au/floatHouse/>

And as for other bits and pieces, best I can do for now is:

<http://dorayme.netweaver.com.au/>

But mostly, I would not recommend any of my stuff to someone just
starting out. About floats, it is probably a good idea for a beginner
to see what he can do without floats for a while.

In fact, I would recommend getting to see how much the beginner can do
with some basic HTML:

Block elements: headings (H1, 2, 3...), paragraphs, DIVS, UL and OL

Inline elements: SPAN, IMG

And some basic CSS: paddings, margins, borders, colors, backgrounds.

And some general overall things about how to link CSS to HTML docs,
the importance of a doctype to avoid quirks.

Best to stay away from *positioning* (e.g. position: absolute for a
while. In fact, stay away from things out of the normal HTML flow.
When limitations are felt, this is the time to learn more things, when
there is hunger, the new appetite will cause a resolve of the spirit.

--
dorayme
 
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Gordon Levi
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      12-07-2013
Christoph Michael Becker <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>Gordon Levi wrote:
>
>> A friend is currently constructing his own web site. He programs
>> process control computers for a living so he is not going to have
>> trouble understanding CSS and HTML. I would like to point him to a
>> short document that explains the basics and prevents him making the
>> classic errors. Any suggestions?

>
>Did your friend consider using a content management system for this purpose?


No. Should he? It's a simple site with a few pages describing what his
one-person company does, his qualifications and experience and how to
contact the company.
 
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Gus Richter
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      12-07-2013
On 12/6/2013 9:00 AM, Gordon Levi wrote:
> A friend is currently constructing his own web site. He programs
> process control computers for a living so he is not going to have
> trouble understanding CSS and HTML. I would like to point him to a
> short document that explains the basics and prevents him making the
> classic errors. Any suggestions?
>


Perhaps this will help:

<https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/>

--
Gus



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Tim W
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      12-07-2013
On 07/12/2013 03:20, Gordon Levi wrote:
> Christoph Michael Becker <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> Gordon Levi wrote:
>>
>>> A friend is currently constructing his own web site. He programs
>>> process control computers for a living so he is not going to have
>>> trouble understanding CSS and HTML. I would like to point him to a
>>> short document that explains the basics and prevents him making the
>>> classic errors. Any suggestions?

>>
>> Did your friend consider using a content management system for this purpose?

>
> No. Should he? It's a simple site with a few pages describing what his
> one-person company does, his qualifications and experience and how to
> contact the company.
>



He totally should. If I am making a site of more than a single page then
I use a Content Management System. This is why:

If you can work an ftp program you can set up a CMS in five minutes.
Cost is nil
Knowledge of css and html is not necessary (but an advantage)
It's quicker and easier to theme a cms than to adapt an html template.
Future maintenance and editing is a cinch.
Upgrading the design in the future is a cinch
You will get ready-made plugin stuff like forms and slideshows
Backups are a cinch
Organising pages on nav menus is a cinch
You will get a much better site.

Wordpress is obviously popular but I would recommend GetSimple CMS as
the best quick, easy, and lite system. there's also CMSimple and Pluck
CMS used to be good but I think is abandoned now.

It has nothing to do with the number of pages. A CMS is just the
sensible way to run any site these days.

Tim W

 
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Tim W
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      12-07-2013
And a link for your mate:

http://www.opensourcecms.com/

[quote]Welcome to OpenSourceCMS.com
OpenSourceCMS.com is a central resource for all things related to Open
Source CMS and gives you the opportunity to "try out" most of the best
Open Source CMS tools in the world without .... [end quote]

Tim W
 
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j
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      12-08-2013
On 12/6/2013 10:25 PM, Ed Mullen wrote:
> Gordon Levi wrote:
>> Christoph Michael Becker <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>>> Gordon Levi wrote:
>>>
>>>> A friend is currently constructing his own web site. He programs
>>>> process control computers for a living so he is not going to have
>>>> trouble understanding CSS and HTML. I would like to point him to a
>>>> short document that explains the basics and prevents him making the
>>>> classic errors. Any suggestions?
>>>
>>> Did your friend consider using a content management system for this
>>> purpose?

>>
>> No. Should he? It's a simple site with a few pages describing what his
>> one-person company does, his qualifications and experience and how to
>> contact the company.
>>

>
> Then it's probably overkill for him at this time.


I'd say so, getting ready to do something (setting up a CMS) shouldn't
take longer than doing it (having a web page).
>
> One of my sites has over 300 pages and I've yet to see any advantage to
> a content management system.


You must have some kind of server processing? Otherwise adjusting the
template or navigation would be a bitch.

I've seen sites that have grown and the changes never get migrated
through. That is where a CMS helps.

Jeff

>


 
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se
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      12-09-2013

"Ed Mullen" <(E-Mail Removed)> skrev i meddelelsen
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>j wrote:
>> On 12/6/2013 10:25 PM, Ed Mullen wrote:
>>> Gordon Levi wrote:
>>>> Christoph Michael Becker <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> Gordon Levi wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> A friend is currently constructing his own web site. He programs
>>>>>> process control computers for a living so he is not going to have
>>>>>> trouble understanding CSS and HTML. I would like to point him to a
>>>>>> short document that explains the basics and prevents him making the
>>>>>> classic errors. Any suggestions?
>>>>>
>>>>> Did your friend consider using a content management system for this
>>>>> purpose?
>>>>
>>>> No. Should he? It's a simple site with a few pages describing what his
>>>> one-person company does, his qualifications and experience and how to
>>>> contact the company.
>>>>
>>>
>>> Then it's probably overkill for him at this time.

>>
>> I'd say so, getting ready to do something (setting up a CMS) shouldn't
>> take longer than doing it (having a web page).
>>>
>>> One of my sites has over 300 pages and I've yet to see any advantage to
>>> a content management system.

>>
>> You must have some kind of server processing? Otherwise adjusting the
>> template or navigation would be a bitch.
>>

>
> The two different templates for unique sections of the site are all styled
> via external CSS files. Changing the style sheet changes every page
> automatically.
>
> The navigation menus are contained in a plain-text file and "included" via
> PHP. To change the navigation I change that one file and all pages are
> updated.
>
> This page explains:
>
> http://edmullen.net/menu_example.php
>
>> I've seen sites that have grown and the changes never get migrated
>> through. That is where a CMS helps.
>>
>> Jeff
>>
>>>

>>

>
>
> --
> Ed Mullen
> http://edmullen.net/
> Everyone hates me because I'm paranoid.


In case you don't know:
In IE6 your table based drop down has a flaw. Menu-cell background-team
are layered above text so to hide it.

Rgds
/se

 
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