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Re: Re-using copyrighted code

 
 
Malte Forkel
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      06-09-2013
I have asked the PSF for help regarding the implications of the license
status of code from sre_parse.py and the missing license statement in
sre.py. I'll happily report their answer to the list I they don't reply
in this thread.

At least partially, my confusion seems to be caused by the dichotomy of
the concepts of copyright and license. How do these relate to each other?

I understand that I have to pick a license for my package. And may be
I'm not free to pick any open source license due the license used by
Secret Labs AB. But how does that relate to the copyright statements?
Should I put my own copyright line in every source file in the package?
How about the file that re-uses portions of sre_parse.py? Can there or
should there be two copyright lines in that file, one from Secret Labs,
one my own?

Malte

 
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Rick Johnson
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      06-09-2013
On Sunday, June 9, 2013 8:21:43 AM UTC-5, Malte Forkel wrote:
> I have asked the PSF for help regarding the implications of the license
> status of code from sre_parse.py and the missing license statement in
> sre.py. I'll happily report their answer to the list I they don't reply
> in this thread.


HaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHa HaHa (deep breath...)

HaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHa HaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHa

I can't say much with great certainty about the leadership of this community, but what i can say for sure is they are NOT going to waste one second of their so-called "precious" time responding to legitimate questions (like yours).

The Secret Labs license is very explicit: "All rights reserved". That line means you can't touch it under pain of lawsuit.
 
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Chris Angelico
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      06-09-2013
On Mon, Jun 10, 2013 at 1:10 AM, Rick Johnson
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> On Sunday, June 9, 2013 8:21:43 AM UTC-5, Malte Forkel wrote:
>> I have asked the PSF for help regarding the implications of the license
>> status of code from sre_parse.py and the missing license statement in
>> sre.py. I'll happily report their answer to the list I they don't reply
>> in this thread.

>
> HaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHa HaHa (deep breath...)
>
> HaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHa HaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHaHa
>
> I can't say much with great certainty about the leadership of this community, but what i can say for sure is they are NOT going to waste one second of their so-called "precious" time responding to legitimate questions (like yours).
>
> The Secret Labs license is very explicit: "All rights reserved". That line means you can't touch it under pain of lawsuit.


Fortunately for all of us, Rick is a troll and not a lawyer.

ChrisA
 
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Steven D'Aprano
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      06-09-2013
On Sun, 09 Jun 2013 08:10:13 -0700, Rick Johnson wrote:

> The Secret Labs license is very explicit: "All rights reserved". That
> line means you can't touch it under pain of lawsuit.


It's also very explicit that the code can be redistributed.

However, there is no explicit rights to modification granted.


--
Steven
 
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Mark Janssen
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      06-09-2013
> The Secret Labs license is very explicit: "All rights reserved". That line means you can't touch it under pain of lawsuit.

That's not true. It means whatever rights they do have, they are
stating, in effect, that they have not given them away. But this is a
difficult legal point, because by open sourcing their IP, they've
already given away from of their rights.
--
MarkJ
Tacoma, Washington
 
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Chris Angelico
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      06-09-2013
On Mon, Jun 10, 2013 at 1:39 AM, Mark Janssen <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> The Secret Labs license is very explicit: "All rights reserved". That line means you can't touch it under pain of lawsuit.

>
> That's not true. It means whatever rights they do have, they are
> stating, in effect, that they have not given them away. But this is a
> difficult legal point, because by open sourcing their IP, they've
> already given away from of their rights.


They start by reserving all rights. Then they say "And you may use
this, on these conditions". This is the normal order of things.

The words "All rights reserved" don't actually add anything, now. (I'm
given to understand they used to have significance, at least in some
jurisdictions, but not any more.) So just "Copyright <date> <your
name>" is sufficient.

ChrisA
 
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