Velocity Reviews - Computer Hardware Reviews

Velocity Reviews > Newsgroups > Programming > C Programming > I need your advices about C prg.

Reply
Thread Tools

I need your advices about C prg.

 
 
Dogukan Bayraktar
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-24-2013
Hi there!

Firstly, sorry for my bad English :/

I'm only 17 and I want to learn C and write perfect codes in C. I'm not so good in C programming, but I want to become a good C programmer.

My English is not enough to read the programming articles or anything.
What should I do to become a good C programmer?

- Do you think is English needed for programming?
- What should I learn in C to become a good programmer?
- Should I read the example C codes in the web?
- etc ... ?

I've been waiting your answers.. Please answer to my questions as soon as possible..

* Thanks ~ !
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Jens Stuckelberger
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-24-2013
On Wed, 24 Apr 2013 12:30:01 -0700, Dogukan Bayraktar wrote:

> Hi there!
>
> Firstly, sorry for my bad English :/
>
> I'm only 17 and I want to learn C and write perfect codes in C. I'm not
> so good in C programming, but I want to become a good C programmer.
>
> My English is not enough to read the programming articles or anything.
> What should I do to become a good C programmer?
>
> - Do you think is English needed for programming? - What should I learn
> in C to become a good programmer? - Should I read the example C codes in
> the web? - etc ... ?
>
> I've been waiting your answers.. Please answer to my questions as soon
> as possible..
>
> * Thanks ~ !


As a non-native English speaker myself I have to say that your
written English is not so bad; mine was certainly worse when I was 17. If
you can read English as you can write it you should be able to learn from
any standard textbook on C. Don't be afraid and try it. I am sure other
members of this forum, far more C-knowledgeable than me, will give you
relevant references.


 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
James Kuyper
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-24-2013
On 04/24/2013 03:30 PM, Dogukan Bayraktar wrote:
> Hi there!
>
> Firstly, sorry for my bad English :/
>
> I'm only 17 and I want to learn C and write perfect codes in C. I'm not so good in C programming, but I want to become a good C programmer.


Trying for "perfect" is just setting yourself up for a lifetime of
disappointment. "good", on the other hand, is quite feasible. I
recommend trying to become an "expert" C programmer; it's an achievable
but challenging goal.

> My English is not enough to read the programming articles or anything.
> What should I do to become a good C programmer?


Finding a forum in your native language devoted to C programming would
be best. Depending upon what language that is, that might be difficult,
bordering on impossible. You might have to improve your English. My
wife's native language is Mandarin, and she's studying accounting. The
hardest part for her isn't the math, but the fact that all of the text
books are written in a very advanced, technically oriented dialect of
English. I suspect you'll have similar trouble with C if you can't find
good text books in your native language.

> - Do you think is English needed for programming?


It shouldn't be - but as I'm a native speaker of English I wouldn't have
noticed if there are serious barriers for non-English speakers. I gather
that there's a fair number of French, German, Russian, Chinese and
Japanese C programmers, so it should be possible to find good texts in
any of those languages, but I can't tell you which ones. There's a lot
of Indian programmers out there, but as far as I can tell they all seem
to have bad things to say about the opportunities for learning
programming that were available to them in India. I'm not sure about any
other languages. I've no idea whether the standard is available in other
languages - as an International standard, it should be, but I can't
remember having ever heard of a translation into any other language.

> - What should I learn in C to become a good programmer?


In the beginning, you'll be spending a lot of time learning how C works,
but that's just learning what the tools of your trade are. To become
good at programming, you need to know the best things to do with those
tools. I think that the most important things are good design and a
disciplined product development cycle. That's true for any programming
language, it isn't specific to C. A good developer will use C only for
tasks for which it's a good choice, and will adapt the design to take
into account the ways that C differs from other languages, but the most
basic principles of good design are pretty much language independent.

> - Should I read the example C codes in the web?


Example code is useful only if you have good reason to believe it's well
written. Badly written C code can teach you a lot of bad habits, and
there's a lot more badly written C code out there, than well-written.
 
Reply With Quote
 
Dogukan Bayraktar
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-24-2013
24 Nisan 2013 Çarşamba 23:00:51 UTC+3 tarihinde Jens Stuckelberger yazdı:
> On Wed, 24 Apr 2013 12:30:01 -0700, Dogukan Bayraktar wrote:
>
>
>
> > Hi there!

>
> >

>
> > Firstly, sorry for my bad English :/

>
> >

>
> > I'm only 17 and I want to learn C and write perfect codes in C. I'm not

>
> > so good in C programming, but I want to become a good C programmer.

>
> >

>
> > My English is not enough to read the programming articles or anything.

>
> > What should I do to become a good C programmer?

>
> >

>
> > - Do you think is English needed for programming? - What should I learn

>
> > in C to become a good programmer? - Should I read the example C codes in

>
> > the web? - etc ... ?

>
> >

>
> > I've been waiting your answers.. Please answer to my questions as soon

>
> > as possible..

>
> >

>
> > * Thanks ~ !

>
>
>
> As a non-native English speaker myself I have to say that your
>
> written English is not so bad; mine was certainly worse when I was 17. If
>
> you can read English as you can write it you should be able to learn from
>
> any standard textbook on C. Don't be afraid and try it. I am sure other
>
> members of this forum, far more C-knowledgeable than me, will give you
>
> relevant references.


Thanks for your comment
 
Reply With Quote
 
Dogukan Bayraktar
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-24-2013
24 Nisan 2013 Çarşamba 23:35:58 UTC+3 tarihinde James Kuyper yazdı:
> On 04/24/2013 03:30 PM, Dogukan Bayraktar wrote:
>
> > Hi there!

>
> >

>
> > Firstly, sorry for my bad English :/

>
> >

>
> > I'm only 17 and I want to learn C and write perfect codes in C. I'm notso good in C programming, but I want to become a good C programmer.

>
>
>
> Trying for "perfect" is just setting yourself up for a lifetime of
>
> disappointment. "good", on the other hand, is quite feasible. I
>
> recommend trying to become an "expert" C programmer; it's an achievable
>
> but challenging goal.
>
>
>
> > My English is not enough to read the programming articles or anything.

>
> > What should I do to become a good C programmer?

>
>
>
> Finding a forum in your native language devoted to C programming would
>
> be best. Depending upon what language that is, that might be difficult,
>
> bordering on impossible. You might have to improve your English. My
>
> wife's native language is Mandarin, and she's studying accounting. The
>
> hardest part for her isn't the math, but the fact that all of the text
>
> books are written in a very advanced, technically oriented dialect of
>
> English. I suspect you'll have similar trouble with C if you can't find
>
> good text books in your native language.
>
>
>
> > - Do you think is English needed for programming?

>
>
>
> It shouldn't be - but as I'm a native speaker of English I wouldn't have
>
> noticed if there are serious barriers for non-English speakers. I gather
>
> that there's a fair number of French, German, Russian, Chinese and
>
> Japanese C programmers, so it should be possible to find good texts in
>
> any of those languages, but I can't tell you which ones. There's a lot
>
> of Indian programmers out there, but as far as I can tell they all seem
>
> to have bad things to say about the opportunities for learning
>
> programming that were available to them in India. I'm not sure about any
>
> other languages. I've no idea whether the standard is available in other
>
> languages - as an International standard, it should be, but I can't
>
> remember having ever heard of a translation into any other language.
>
>
>
> > - What should I learn in C to become a good programmer?

>
>
>
> In the beginning, you'll be spending a lot of time learning how C works,
>
> but that's just learning what the tools of your trade are. To become
>
> good at programming, you need to know the best things to do with those
>
> tools. I think that the most important things are good design and a
>
> disciplined product development cycle. That's true for any programming
>
> language, it isn't specific to C. A good developer will use C only for
>
> tasks for which it's a good choice, and will adapt the design to take
>
> into account the ways that C differs from other languages, but the most
>
> basic principles of good design are pretty much language independent.
>
>
>
> > - Should I read the example C codes in the web?

>
>
>
> Example code is useful only if you have good reason to believe it's well
>
> written. Badly written C code can teach you a lot of bad habits, and
>
> there's a lot more badly written C code out there, than well-written.


Thank you so much! I have learned a lot of things about English and C Programming

Your comment is so helpful for me..
~~ Thanks again ~~
 
Reply With Quote
 
Keith Thompson
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-24-2013
Dogukan Bayraktar <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:
> Firstly, sorry for my bad English :/


It's certainly better than my anything-other-than-English.

Q: What do you call someone who speaks two languages?
A: Bilingual.
Q: What do you call someone who speaks only one language?
A: American.

> I'm only 17 and I want to learn C and write perfect codes in C. I'm
> not so good in C programming, but I want to become a good C
> programmer.
>
> My English is not enough to read the programming articles or anything.
> What should I do to become a good C programmer?
>
> - Do you think is English needed for programming?
> - What should I learn in C to become a good programmer?
> - Should I read the example C codes in the web?
> - etc ... ?


One small piece of advice: if a book or tutorial tells you that

void main()

is correct, avoid it. It's not a huge deal by itself (many
compilers will accept it, and it's easy enough to change to the
correct "int main(void)" in your own code), but it's a sign that
the author really doesn't know the language very well.

("void main()" can actually be valid in some circumstances,
particularly for embedded systems, but you're not likely to be
using such systems.)

--
Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
Working, but not speaking, for JetHead Development, Inc.
"We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this."
-- Antony Jay and Jonathan Lynn, "Yes Minister"
 
Reply With Quote
 
Johannes Bauer
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-25-2013
On 25.04.2013 11:44, David Brown wrote:

> "void main(void)" is preferable in most embedded systems - you want to
> explicitly say it has no arguments. Of course, it's a different matter
> if you intend to return from main or pass arguments to it, but in most
> small embedded systems main() never exits.


"main" has a return parameter which is an int. Always.

> Depending on the situation, I would say you are actually quite likely to
> be working on embedded systems if you are programming in C. After all,
> the great majority of embedded systems are coded in C (followed by C++),
> and there are a great many embedded systems out there.


So because most embedded systems are programmed in C you conclude that
most C programms are for embedded systems? Something is seriously wrong
with your logic.

Regards,
Johannes

--
>> Wo hattest Du das Beben nochmal GENAU vorhergesagt?

> Zumindest nicht ffentlich!

Ah, der neueste und bis heute genialste Streich unsere groen
Kosmologen: Die Geheim-Vorhersage.
- Karl Kaos ber Rdiger Thomas in dsa <hidbv3$om2$(E-Mail Removed)>
 
Reply With Quote
 
James Kuyper
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-25-2013
On 04/25/2013 08:42 AM, Johannes Bauer wrote:
> On 25.04.2013 11:44, David Brown wrote:
>
>> "void main(void)" is preferable in most embedded systems - you want to
>> explicitly say it has no arguments. Of course, it's a different matter
>> if you intend to return from main or pass arguments to it, but in most
>> small embedded systems main() never exits.

>
> "main" has a return parameter which is an int. Always.


He was responding to a comment Keith made that was specifically about
the fact (and it is a fact) that some compilers do accept void main(),
despite what it says to the contrary in the C standard.

>> Depending on the situation, I would say you are actually quite likely to
>> be working on embedded systems if you are programming in C. After all,
>> the great majority of embedded systems are coded in C (followed by C++),
>> and there are a great many embedded systems out there.

>
> So because most embedded systems are programmed in C you conclude that
> most C programms are for embedded systems? Something is seriously wrong
> with your logic.


Only because you left out a key step in that logic: "there are a great
many embedded systems out there". That's not enough to prove that most C
programs are for embedded systems, but depending upon the number
corresponding to "a great many", it could be strong supporting evidence
for that claim.

In this newsgroup I've talked with a number of people who thought that
most, if not all, current C programming is being done for embedded
platforms. When challenged, none have been able to provide hard numbers
in support of their claim. To be fair, I know of no good source of
numbers to disprove the claim, either. But the simple fact that anybody
believes it is, in itself, evidence for the existence of a fairly large
amount of embedded C programming going on.
--
James Kuyper
 
Reply With Quote
 
Stephen Sprunk
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-25-2013
On 24-Apr-13 16:39, Keith Thompson wrote:
> Dogukan Bayraktar <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:
>> Firstly, sorry for my bad English :/

>
> It's certainly better than my anything-other-than-English.
>
> Q: What do you call someone who speaks two languages?
> A: Bilingual.
> Q: What do you call someone who speaks only one language?
> A: American.


American monolingualism is overstated; the commonly-cited statistic from
the Census Bureau tracks only languages spoken at home (18% not
English), not how many languages people are _capable_ of speaking.

One of the problems that English-speaking countries have is there is no
obvious choice of second language for our students, whereas English is
an obvious (and now by far the most common) choice in other countries.
There are only a handful of other languages spoken by enough people to
be useful, and these days most people in those countries are learning
English now, so why bother?

The main exception to that is for people who achieve fluency in two (or
more) languages, which enables a career as a translator or diplomat. In
the US, that is generally limited to second-generation immigrants
because our schools (a) start students on foreign languages too late and
(b) can't provide a critical mass of native speakers for them to
practice with.

>> I'm only 17 and I want to learn C and write perfect codes in C. I'm
>> not so good in C programming, but I want to become a good C
>> programmer.
>>
>> My English is not enough to read the programming articles or
>> anything. What should I do to become a good C programmer?


Whether we like it or not, the programming world (and tech industry in
general) is dominated by English. If you don't know it at least well
enough to read articles, then working on that is essential, regardless
of which programming language you intend to use. User documentation and
interfaces are often localized, but systems and API documentation rarely
are.

On the plus side, you probably only need to learn to read and write
English, not speak it--though that would open up a huge number of job
opportunities for other reasons. I work with many programmers whose
accents are nearly incomprehensible to me, but their emails are clear
enough that it's not a barrier, and live conversations with them are
rare anyway due to time zone differences.

S

--
Stephen Sprunk "God does not play dice." --Albert Einstein
CCIE #3723 "God is an inveterate gambler, and He throws the
K5SSS dice at every possible opportunity." --Stephen Hawking
 
Reply With Quote
 
Dogukan Bayraktar
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-25-2013
25 Nisan 2013 Perşembe 14:30:47 UTC+3 tarihinde David Brown yazdı:
> On 24/04/13 21:30, Dogukan Bayraktar wrote:
>
> > Hi there!

>
> >

>
> > Firstly, sorry for my bad English :/

>
> >

>
> > I'm only 17 and I want to learn C and write perfect codes in C. I'm notso good in C programming, but I want to become a good C programmer.

>
> >

>
> > My English is not enough to read the programming articles or anything.

>
> > What should I do to become a good C programmer?

>
> >

>
> > - Do you think is English needed for programming?

>
> > - What should I learn in C to become a good programmer?

>
> > - Should I read the example C codes in the web?

>
> > - etc ... ?

>
> >

>
> > I've been waiting your answers.. Please answer to my questions as soon as possible..

>
> >

>
> > * Thanks ~ !

>
> >

>
>
>
> English is not needed for programming - but it /is/ needed to be an
>
> expert as will then have to read technical texts, standards, etc., as
>
> well as work with existing source code and documentation from around the
>
> world. Fair or not, English is the standard here. Even for programming
>
> languages created and developed outside
>
>
>
> But judging from your post here, your English is already better than
>
> many adult native speakers, so don't worry about it. I'm sure there is
>
> room for improvement, but that will come as you get more education, and
>
> read and write more.
>
>
>
> Incidentally, what is your native language?
>
>
>
> As for becoming a good C programmer, the first question is /why/? If
>
> you want to become a good programmer, C is not necessarily a good choice
>
> for starting. The field of programming is vast - C is only suitable for
>
> a small part of that. What sort of programming are you actually
>
> interested in?


Thanks for you comment

I'm from Turkey. So my native language is Turkish. But I want to learn English so much

I've been learning C for 5 months. But I want to improve my skills for C programming. I love C/C++ languages more than other languages like Java and C#.

I'm interested in C/C++, Python, PHP.

I hope you understand me
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
silly question about Running a script from the command line A.Rock Python 0 04-10-2013 11:21 AM
newbie question about confusing exception handling in urllib cabbar@gmail.com Python 6 04-09-2013 07:11 PM
Need your advices =?utf-8?B?5rW36aOO?= Java 10 04-17-2006 10:26 PM
Need advices for exam 70-306 LoveGarfield MCSD 3 09-21-2003 11:06 AM
need advices : intranet archecture design Gildas Garcia ASP .Net 0 07-04-2003 07:08 PM



Advertisments