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Windows 8 - so bad it's hastening the death of the PC?

 
 
victor
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      04-13-2013
On 13/04/2013 8:32 a.m., Gib Bogle wrote:
> On 12/04/2013 1:27 a.m., ~misfit~ wrote:
>> http://www.nzherald.co.nz/technology...ectid=10876853
>>
>>
>> [Excerpt:]
>>
>> "In an attempt to keep the PC relevant, Microsoft released a radical new
>> version of Windows on October 26. Windows 8 has a completely new look and
>> forces users to learn new ways to control their machines.
>> "Unfortunately, it seems clear that the Windows 8 launch not only didn't
>> provide a positive boost to the PC market, but appears to have slowed the
>> market," IDC Vice President Bob O'Donnell said."
>>
>> [/Excerpt]
>>
>> Am I the only person reminded of the fable of the greedy dog who had a
>> nice
>> meaty bone and, on crossing a bridge saw his reflection below him in the
>> water. He wanted the other bone that he saw too so he opened his mouth to
>> grab it and - of course, lost the bone he had in the process.
>>

>
>
> What worries me about the popularity of smart phones, tablets and pads
> is that the economies of scale in PC production will presumably become
> less effective, and I'll have to pay more for the powerful desktop
> machine that I need.


You are right, but probably not that much more.
You could also be able to access more processing power online via Amazon
EC2 Microsoft Azure etc via RDP or VNC etc, because all these app driven
devices are driving the growth of cloud processing.
Microsoft needs to be in that market to survive.
 
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Enkidu
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      04-13-2013
On 13/04/13 08:32, Gib Bogle wrote:
> On 12/04/2013 1:27 a.m., ~misfit~ wrote:
>> http://www.nzherald.co.nz/technology...ectid=10876853
>>
>>
>> [Excerpt:]
>>
>> "In an attempt to keep the PC relevant, Microsoft released a radical new
>> version of Windows on October 26. Windows 8 has a completely new look and
>> forces users to learn new ways to control their machines.
>> "Unfortunately, it seems clear that the Windows 8 launch not only didn't
>> provide a positive boost to the PC market, but appears to have slowed the
>> market," IDC Vice President Bob O'Donnell said."
>>
>> [/Excerpt]
>>
>> Am I the only person reminded of the fable of the greedy dog who had a
>> nice
>> meaty bone and, on crossing a bridge saw his reflection below him in the
>> water. He wanted the other bone that he saw too so he opened his mouth to
>> grab it and - of course, lost the bone he had in the process.
>>

>
>
> What worries me about the popularity of smart phones, tablets and pads
> is that the economies of scale in PC production will presumably become
> less effective, and I'll have to pay more for the powerful desktop
> machine that I need.
>

The costs of production in the slave shops of Asia are still falling,
apparently. Look out for rises in prices as the human rights advocates
force the production facilities to change. (Not that I'm suggesting that
the slave shops should be allowed to continue of course). That'll affect
the phones and tablet prices too of course.

I'd say that the desktop market is driven by businesses, but except for
developers, most businesses are handing out laptops to individuals and
using specialised kit for servers, so you may be right.

Cheers,

Cliff
 
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geopelia
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      04-13-2013

"Crash McBash" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> On Fri, 12 Apr 2013 01:27:14 +1200, "~misfit~"
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>>http://www.nzherald.co.nz/technology...ectid=10876853
>>
>>[Excerpt:]
>>
>>"In an attempt to keep the PC relevant, Microsoft released a radical new
>>version of Windows on October 26. Windows 8 has a completely new look and
>>forces users to learn new ways to control their machines.
>>"Unfortunately, it seems clear that the Windows 8 launch not only didn't
>>provide a positive boost to the PC market, but appears to have slowed the
>>market," IDC Vice President Bob O'Donnell said."
>>
>>[/Excerpt]
>>
>>Am I the only person reminded of the fable of the greedy dog who had a
>>nice
>>meaty bone and, on crossing a bridge saw his reflection below him in the
>>water. He wanted the other bone that he saw too so he opened his mouth to
>>grab it and - of course, lost the bone he had in the process.

>
> The real issue here is not MS vs non-MS but the evolution of hardware.
> The first paragraph of that article clearly signals this:
>
> =====
> The ailing personal computer market is getting weaker, and it's
> starting to look as if it will never fully recover as a new generation
> of mobile devices reshapes the way people use technology.
> =====
>
> How many smartphone users know or care about the name of the OS on the
> device they buy?
>
> IMHO the smartphone is the current must-have primarily as a fashion
> accessory but also as a mobile PC accessory. It will be more
> interesting though as to what happens when those same smartphone users
> see the limitations on performance and quality. These are areas where
> the laptop/PC excel and this wont change over the next few years.
>
> AIUI MS in Windows 8 have sought to introduce the same sort of
> touch-screen interface to the OS that is common amongst smartphones.
> This in part ensures that in the future when smartphone users realise
> they don't have a PC in their phone, they will find the move back to a
> modern laptop or PC easy.
>
> Personally I don't see the need for a smartphone because it delivers
> nothing more than my current cellphone and laptop. The tiny screen on
> smartphones is totally unsuitable as a monitor-replacement.



Could computer sales have gone down because most people have got a computer
by now?
When I got mine about 12 years ago many people still hadn't got one.
I've just replaced mine (same keyboard, mouse, monitor , printer etc.)
Still trying to get everything back in order as it was before.
And I still haven't got a mobile phone.


 
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victor
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Posts: n/a
 
      04-13-2013
On 13/04/2013 3:59 p.m., Crash McBash wrote:
> On Fri, 12 Apr 2013 01:27:14 +1200, "~misfit~"
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> http://www.nzherald.co.nz/technology...ectid=10876853
>>
>> [Excerpt:]
>>
>> "In an attempt to keep the PC relevant, Microsoft released a radical new
>> version of Windows on October 26. Windows 8 has a completely new look and
>> forces users to learn new ways to control their machines.
>> "Unfortunately, it seems clear that the Windows 8 launch not only didn't
>> provide a positive boost to the PC market, but appears to have slowed the
>> market," IDC Vice President Bob O'Donnell said."
>>
>> [/Excerpt]
>>
>> Am I the only person reminded of the fable of the greedy dog who had a nice
>> meaty bone and, on crossing a bridge saw his reflection below him in the
>> water. He wanted the other bone that he saw too so he opened his mouth to
>> grab it and - of course, lost the bone he had in the process.

>
> The real issue here is not MS vs non-MS but the evolution of hardware.
> The first paragraph of that article clearly signals this:
>
> =====
> The ailing personal computer market is getting weaker, and it's
> starting to look as if it will never fully recover as a new generation
> of mobile devices reshapes the way people use technology.
> =====
>
> How many smartphone users know or care about the name of the OS on the
> device they buy?
>
> IMHO the smartphone is the current must-have primarily as a fashion
> accessory but also as a mobile PC accessory. It will be more
> interesting though as to what happens when those same smartphone users
> see the limitations on performance and quality. These are areas where
> the laptop/PC excel and this wont change over the next few years.
>
> AIUI MS in Windows 8 have sought to introduce the same sort of
> touch-screen interface to the OS that is common amongst smartphones.
> This in part ensures that in the future when smartphone users realise
> they don't have a PC in their phone, they will find the move back to a
> modern laptop or PC easy.
>
> Personally I don't see the need for a smartphone because it delivers
> nothing more than my current cellphone and laptop. The tiny screen on
> smartphones is totally unsuitable as a monitor-replacement.
>


Smartphone users are generally familiar with PCs and the internet.
Smartphones aren't standalone devices. Some might be using all the
social stuff where the phone or tablet is the interface to a datacenter,
some might be accessing all their dropbox info or keeping track of jobs
with evernote, or accessing and sharing documentation or drawings. They
might be using the camera as a scanner or barcode reader, or to keep
receipts and business cards and notes. They might access traffic reports
or timetables. Its a whole other set of tools and toys. I'm not a power
user, but I can see that smartphone utility has changed radically over
the last few years.
The reason MS has built the new interface for W8 is because of the apps
with multitouch and speech recognition which will have to run on tablets
phones laptops desktops and TVs to make their cloud based Azure platform
accessible.
The old PC will still be there underneath for a while. Just like the old
phone, but MS is trying to maintain their advantage by putting web apps
on the front screen before you open Chrome.
 
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geopelia
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      04-13-2013

"geoff" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news(E-Mail Removed) ...
>
> "geopelia" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:kkatai$r12$(E-Mail Removed)...
>>

> .
>>
>>
>> Could computer sales have gone down because most people have got a
>> computer by now?

>
>
> The sophistication of software, and it's capabilities increase hand in
> hand with the power and scale of the current technology.
>
> If you are happy with the things you could do on you computer 12 years
> ago, or the quality of your TV, then fine. But there are newer things out
> there that are sometimes better.
>
> Windows 8 isn't one of them though.
>
>> And I still haven't got a mobile phone.

>
> If you can't think of, or nobody can suggest a reason why you would
> benefit from having a mobile phone, then there is no reason to have one.
>
> geoff


I would keep it turned off anyway, unless I wanted to send or receive a
message.
email is good enough for me.


 
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~misfit~
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Posts: n/a
 
      04-14-2013
Somewhere on teh intarwebs Peter Huebner wrote:
> In article <kk86ok$2hp$(E-Mail Removed)>, http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed)
> says...
>> Also, in this theoretical scenario it would be the fact that the
>> tablet, running a tablet-centric OS was far more user-friendly than
>> a aptop running a tablet-friendly OS. If I were used to a laptop,
>> were looking to replace the laptop and I was shown machines running
>> W7 then I'd likely go for another laptop.
>>
>> Bottom line: MS are (prematurely) hammering nails into the coffin of
>> the traditional 'computer' IMO (and the opinions of more than a few
>> journos). --
>> /Shaun.

>
> When I went laptop shopping in December there were quite a lot of
> buisiness oriented Laptops (and some pretty grunty ones at that) still
> offered with Win7.


Same thing happened with XP and Vivasta - especially with business oriented
hardware so that it could be integrated easilly into existing
infrastructure..... And that *was* Dec 2012.

> In fact I had the very same option. I went with
> Win8 because of what I'd been told about its demand on hardware and
> thepossibility that it had been better optimised for battery life.


Yup, understood. However you're a power-user / IT guy so, like I said, your
decision will be different from Joe Punter's.

How you're getting to enjoy yourself.
--
/Shaun.

"Humans will have advanced a long, long, way when religious belief has a
cozy little classification in the DSM."
David Melville (in r.a.s.f1)


 
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Bruce Sinclair
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Posts: n/a
 
      04-14-2013
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, "geoff" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>"geopelia" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>news:kkatai$r12$(E-Mail Removed)...


>> Could computer sales have gone down because most people have got a
>> computer by now?

>The sophistication of software, and it's capabilities increase hand in hand
>with the power and scale of the current technology.
>If you are happy with the things you could do on you computer 12 years ago,
>or the quality of your TV, then fine. But there are newer things out there
>that are sometimes better.


"Sometimes" being the operative word here. Often not ... it's often simply
that the company selling the new thing has an empty cookie jar.


>Windows 8 isn't one of them though.


From the little I have seen of it, I want it not at all. I have yet to hear
convincing reasons why XP is finished. I doubt it is.


>> And I still haven't got a mobile phone.

>If you can't think of, or nobody can suggest a reason why you would benefit
>from having a mobile phone, then there is no reason to have one.


Exactly so, well said. "Why is this a good idea" is an excellent question.
More of us should be asking this more often.




 
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Enkidu
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Posts: n/a
 
      04-15-2013
On 15/04/13 11:23, Bruce Sinclair wrote:
> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, "geoff" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> "geopelia" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>> news:kkatai$r12$(E-Mail Removed)...

>
>>> Could computer sales have gone down because most people have got a
>>> computer by now?

>> The sophistication of software, and it's capabilities increase hand in hand
>> with the power and scale of the current technology.
>> If you are happy with the things you could do on you computer 12 years ago,
>> or the quality of your TV, then fine. But there are newer things out there
>> that are sometimes better.

>
> "Sometimes" being the operative word here. Often not ... it's often simply
> that the company selling the new thing has an empty cookie jar.
>
>
>> Windows 8 isn't one of them though.

>
> From the little I have seen of it, I want it not at all. I have yet to hear
> convincing reasons why XP is finished. I doubt it is.
>
>
>>> And I still haven't got a mobile phone.

>> If you can't think of, or nobody can suggest a reason why you would benefit
>>from having a mobile phone, then there is no reason to have one.

>
> Exactly so, well said. "Why is this a good idea" is an excellent question.
> More of us should be asking this more often.
>

Up to a point. You don't necessarily know how useful you would find
something until you get one.

Cheers,

Cliff

 
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Bruce Sinclair
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Posts: n/a
 
      04-15-2013
In article <516b5746$(E-Mail Removed)>, Enkidu <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>On 15/04/13 11:23, Bruce Sinclair wrote:
>> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, "geoff"

> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>> "geopelia" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>> news:kkatai$r12$(E-Mail Removed)...

>>
>>>> Could computer sales have gone down because most people have got a
>>>> computer by now?
>>> The sophistication of software, and it's capabilities increase hand in hand
>>> with the power and scale of the current technology.
>>> If you are happy with the things you could do on you computer 12 years ago,
>>> or the quality of your TV, then fine. But there are newer things out there
>>> that are sometimes better.

>> "Sometimes" being the operative word here. Often not ... it's often simply
>> that the company selling the new thing has an empty cookie jar.
>>> Windows 8 isn't one of them though.

>>
>> From the little I have seen of it, I want it not at all. I have yet to hear
>> convincing reasons why XP is finished. I doubt it is.
>>>> And I still haven't got a mobile phone.
>>> If you can't think of, or nobody can suggest a reason why you would benefit
>>>from having a mobile phone, then there is no reason to have one.

>> Exactly so, well said. "Why is this a good idea" is an excellent question.
>> More of us should be asking this more often.


>Up to a point. You don't necessarily know how useful you would find
>something until you get one.


Some truth to that - the unknown unknown. But if I haven't missed it/wanted
to do it already, I'm unlikely to care I reckon.
So far, there's nothing that people have talked about that I want to do. I
have, OTOH, often asked ... "and why is that a *good* thing ?".








 
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