Velocity Reviews - Computer Hardware Reviews

Velocity Reviews > Newsgroups > Computing > Digital Photography > Quandary - DX or FX?

Reply
Thread Tools

Quandary - DX or FX?

 
 
nospam
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-11-2013
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Alan Browne
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> > A DX camera can be advantageous for event photography (where you may be
> > trying
> > to capture faces from across the room), because it amplifies the effect of a
> > telephoto lens.

>
> You can always crop a FF to the same end effect.


and with a nikon d800, you get about the same number of pixels as you
would if you had a d7000 (15.4 versus 16 mp).
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Robert Coe
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-12-2013
On Thu, 11 Apr 2013 18:09:45 -0400, Alan Browne
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
: On 2013.04.10 21:08 , Robert Coe wrote:
: > On Wed, 10 Apr 2013 12:00:46 +0000 (UTC), Joe Makowiec
: > <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
: > : On 10 Apr 2013 in rec.photo.digital.slr-systems, Nige Danton wrote:
: > :
: > : > I'm in a bit of a quandary. I've currently got a D7000 and an
: > : > 18-105 lens. Ive recently (this year) switched back to SLR's after a
: > : > decade of using digital point and shoot. I'm certainly pleased with
: > : > D7000, but am finding the 18-105 to be a bit too slow in low light
: > : > (indoors without flash) and am thinking of buying a faster lens.
: > :
: > : I have a D7000, and I've found that I can get acceptable to very good
: > : results up to about ISO 1600, so try shooting at a higher ISO.
: > :
: > : <snip>
: > : > My quandary is this. I'm not (at all) sure that I'm satisfied with a DX
: > : > format and really don't want to buy new lenses and accessories and then
: > : > find myself needing to re-buy them if/when I buy an FX body.
: > : <snip>
: > : > Appreciate any feedback.
: > :
: > : What is the ultimate destination of the pictures? If you're printing and
: > : blowing up your pictures substantially, there might be some merit to an
: > : FX camera. If you're going mainly to screen, and not taking small crops
: > : out of the center of the image, DX should work fine.
: >
: > Building on Joe's point ...
: > A DX camera can be advantageous for event photography (where you may be trying
: > to capture faces from across the room), because it amplifies the effect of a
: > telephoto lens.
:
: You can always crop a FF to the same end effect.

FX cameras are heavier; and if you carry two cameras, as I usually do at
events, the end effect on your neck muscles may not be the same. :^)

Bob
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Fredrik Jonson
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-12-2013
Nige Danton wrote:

> I'm in a bit of a quandary. I've currently got a D7000 and an 18-105 lens.
> I'm pleased with D7000, but am finding the 18-105 to be a bit too slow in
> low light (indoors without flash) and am thinking of buying a faster lens.


I'm not an authority on these things, but the nikon 50/1.8D (or G) is a marvel
on DX and works fine for close portraits. There is also the 35/1.8 DX, which
gets excellent reviews. These two give you tons of light on a DX camera,
just what you need for indoor without flash. And they're inexpensive, sub USD
200 I think. Maybe not 18 wide and not zooms, but very bright.

Before you shell out on a D600 or D800, give these little friends a go. The
50/1.8 is FX, so even if you still think that you'll go FX after trying them
out, you can keep it for your future equipment. If you want to hedge your
bet on the 35 too, you can go for the slightly more expensive 35/2D, also FX.

What I'm saying is that, while I can see the convenience of using a zoom all
the time, I'd say it is almost a waste of money to own a DSLR and not having
a few - inexpensive, but awesome image quality - primes in your possession.

Your D7000 will shine, and if it doesn't Thom Hogan says it is not the camera
that is failing you.

http://bythom.com/nikond7000review.htm

Having that said, if money is no issue, I can sympathise with getting a FX
camera. Not because the D7000 cannot deliver, but because you get a big bright
viewfinder again.

--
Fredrik Jonson
 
Reply With Quote
 
PeterN
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-17-2013
On 4/10/2013 5:29 AM, me wrote:
> On Wed, 10 Apr 2013 07:10:59 +0000 (UTC), Nige Danton
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> I'm in a bit of a quandary. I've currently got a D7000 and an 18-105 lens.
>> Ive recently (this year) switched back to SLR's after a decade of using
>> digital point and shoot. I'm certainly pleased with D7000, but am finding
>> the 18-105 to be a bit too slow in low light (indoors without flash) and am
>> thinking of buying a faster lens.

>
> First, try the no cost solution of either bumping the iso up and/or
> trying the auto-iso function to allow you to do it with some
> additional control. What shutter/f.l. combos are you shooting.
>


do all DSLRs have auto ISO.

--
PeterN
 
Reply With Quote
 
PeterN
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-17-2013
On 4/10/2013 9:08 PM, Robert Coe wrote:
> On Wed, 10 Apr 2013 12:00:46 +0000 (UTC), Joe Makowiec
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> : On 10 Apr 2013 in rec.photo.digital.slr-systems, Nige Danton wrote:
> :
> : > I'm in a bit of a quandary. I've currently got a D7000 and an
> : > 18-105 lens. Ive recently (this year) switched back to SLR's after a
> : > decade of using digital point and shoot. I'm certainly pleased with
> : > D7000, but am finding the 18-105 to be a bit too slow in low light
> : > (indoors without flash) and am thinking of buying a faster lens.
> :
> : I have a D7000, and I've found that I can get acceptable to very good
> : results up to about ISO 1600, so try shooting at a higher ISO.
> :
> : <snip>
> : > My quandary is this. I'm not (at all) sure that I'm satisfied with a DX
> : > format and really don't want to buy new lenses and accessories and then
> : > find myself needing to re-buy them if/when I buy an FX body.
> : <snip>
> : > Appreciate any feedback.
> :
> : What is the ultimate destination of the pictures? If you're printing and
> : blowing up your pictures substantially, there might be some merit to an
> : FX camera. If you're going mainly to screen, and not taking small crops
> : out of the center of the image, DX should work fine.
>
> Building on Joe's point ...
> A DX camera can be advantageous for event photography (where you may be trying
> to capture faces from across the room), because it amplifies the effect of a
> telephoto lens. But not so much for landscapes, where you may need the wider
> view of FX.
>
> Bob
>


One can alwyas shoot an fx in dx mode.

--
PeterN
 
Reply With Quote
 
PeterN
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-17-2013
On 4/17/2013 5:15 PM, Savageduck wrote:
> On 2013-04-17 13:48:18 -0700, PeterN <(E-Mail Removed)> said:
>
>> On 4/10/2013 5:29 AM, me wrote:
>>> On Wed, 10 Apr 2013 07:10:59 +0000 (UTC), Nige Danton
>>> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>
>>>> I'm in a bit of a quandary. I've currently got a D7000 and an
>>>> 18-105 lens.
>>>> Ive recently (this year) switched back to SLR's after a decade of using
>>>> digital point and shoot. I'm certainly pleased with D7000, but am
>>>> finding
>>>> the 18-105 to be a bit too slow in low light (indoors without flash)
>>>> and am
>>>> thinking of buying a faster lens.
>>>
>>> First, try the no cost solution of either bumping the iso up and/or
>>> trying the auto-iso function to allow you to do it with some
>>> additional control. What shutter/f.l. combos are you shooting.
>>>

>>
>> do all DSLRs have auto ISO.

>
> Well your D300 & D800 both have it.
> < https://dl.dropbox.com/u/1295663/Fil...enshot_196.jpg >
>


Yup! But not all do.

--
PeterN

 
Reply With Quote
 
PeterN
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-17-2013
On 4/17/2013 6:12 PM, Savageduck wrote:
> On 2013-04-17 14:31:20 -0700, PeterN <(E-Mail Removed)> said:
>
>> On 4/17/2013 5:15 PM, Savageduck wrote:
>>> On 2013-04-17 13:48:18 -0700, PeterN <(E-Mail Removed)> said:
>>>
>>>> On 4/10/2013 5:29 AM, me wrote:
>>>>> On Wed, 10 Apr 2013 07:10:59 +0000 (UTC), Nige Danton
>>>>> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> I'm in a bit of a quandary. I've currently got a D7000 and an
>>>>>> 18-105 lens.
>>>>>> Ive recently (this year) switched back to SLR's after a decade of
>>>>>> using
>>>>>> digital point and shoot. I'm certainly pleased with D7000, but am
>>>>>> finding
>>>>>> the 18-105 to be a bit too slow in low light (indoors without flash)
>>>>>> and am
>>>>>> thinking of buying a faster lens.
>>>>>
>>>>> First, try the no cost solution of either bumping the iso up and/or
>>>>> trying the auto-iso function to allow you to do it with some
>>>>> additional control. What shutter/f.l. combos are you shooting.
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>> do all DSLRs have auto ISO.
>>>
>>> Well your D300 & D800 both have it.
>>> < https://dl.dropbox.com/u/1295663/Fil...enshot_196.jpg >
>>>

>>
>> Yup! But not all do.

>
> Most Nikon DSLRs do, and most importantly with regard to this particular
> discussion the D7000 mentioned above does:
> < https://dl.dropbox.com/u/1295663/Fil...enshot_197.jpg >
>
>


True, but minimum shutter speeds can limit its usefulness.

--
PeterN
 
Reply With Quote
 
nospam
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-17-2013
In article <516f1f81$0$10837$(E-Mail Removed)-secrets.com>, PeterN
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> >>>> do all DSLRs have auto ISO.
> >>>
> >>> Well your D300 & D800 both have it.
> >>> < https://dl.dropbox.com/u/1295663/Fil...enshot_196.jpg >
> >>
> >> Yup! But not all do.

> >
> > Most Nikon DSLRs do, and most importantly with regard to this particular
> > discussion the D7000 mentioned above does:
> > < https://dl.dropbox.com/u/1295663/Fil...enshot_197.jpg >

>
> True, but minimum shutter speeds can limit its usefulness.


not at all. that's exactly why auto-iso useful.
 
Reply With Quote
 
me
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-17-2013
On Wed, 17 Apr 2013 18:17:37 -0400, PeterN
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>On 4/17/2013 6:12 PM, Savageduck wrote:
>> On 2013-04-17 14:31:20 -0700, PeterN <(E-Mail Removed)> said:
>>
>>> On 4/17/2013 5:15 PM, Savageduck wrote:
>>>> On 2013-04-17 13:48:18 -0700, PeterN <(E-Mail Removed)> said:
>>>>
>>>>> On 4/10/2013 5:29 AM, me wrote:
>>>>>> On Wed, 10 Apr 2013 07:10:59 +0000 (UTC), Nige Danton
>>>>>> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> I'm in a bit of a quandary. I've currently got a D7000 and an
>>>>>>> 18-105 lens.
>>>>>>> Ive recently (this year) switched back to SLR's after a decade of
>>>>>>> using
>>>>>>> digital point and shoot. I'm certainly pleased with D7000, but am
>>>>>>> finding
>>>>>>> the 18-105 to be a bit too slow in low light (indoors without flash)
>>>>>>> and am
>>>>>>> thinking of buying a faster lens.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> First, try the no cost solution of either bumping the iso up and/or
>>>>>> trying the auto-iso function to allow you to do it with some
>>>>>> additional control. What shutter/f.l. combos are you shooting.
>>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> do all DSLRs have auto ISO.
>>>>
>>>> Well your D300 & D800 both have it.
>>>> < https://dl.dropbox.com/u/1295663/Fil...enshot_196.jpg >
>>>>
>>>
>>> Yup! But not all do.

>>
>> Most Nikon DSLRs do, and most importantly with regard to this particular
>> discussion the D7000 mentioned above does:
>> < https://dl.dropbox.com/u/1295663/Fil...enshot_197.jpg >
>>
>>

>
>True, but minimum shutter speeds can limit its usefulness.


In the D200/D300 which I own you can set a max iso and min shutter
speed.Shhot aperture priority and you also have control of that within
all the defined limits. Lower level Nikons may not implement this the
same way and Canon does not follow this full implementation either.
 
Reply With Quote
 
Trevor
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-18-2013

"PeterN" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:516f0d4d$0$10818$(E-Mail Removed)-secrets.com...
> On 4/10/2013 9:08 PM, Robert Coe wrote:
>> A DX camera can be advantageous for event photography (where you may be
>> trying
>> to capture faces from across the room), because it amplifies the effect
>> of a
>> telephoto lens. But not so much for landscapes, where you may need the
>> wider
>> view of FX.

>
> One can alwyas shoot an fx in dx mode.



Or simply crop later in PS.

Trevor.


 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
in a bit of a quandary about an SMTP receiver Eric S. Johansson Python 0 07-15-2007 03:38 PM
Laptop Quandary Cheekycharlie Computer Support 4 07-05-2007 05:15 AM
Compression quandary / question Earl Misanchuk Digital Photography 4 09-15-2006 06:52 PM
The Submit quandary Robyn Javascript 0 09-08-2003 09:38 AM



Advertisments