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Re: How to arrange some numbers

 
 
Keith Thompson
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      03-15-2013
"paskali" <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:
> Hi, a simple question:
> i want to arrange some int numbers; i want to store them
> in an array and then print them on the screen.
>
> Look below:
>
> int numbers[10], arranged[10], i;
> puts("Insert 10 int numbers");
> for(i = 0; i <= 9; i ++, scanf("%d", &numbers[i]));
> ?
> for(i = 0; i <= 9; i ++, printf("/n%d", arranged[i]));
>
> I insert: 10 7 45 678 0 34 6 1 4 3
> I should see on the screen: 0 1 3 4 6 7 10 34 45 678
> Simple. Help me to replace question mark.


http://whathaveyoutried.com/

If this is a homework assignment, please give us your instructor's
e-mail address so credit can be properly given.

One clue: the word you're looking for is "sort".

--
Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
Working, but not speaking, for JetHead Development, Inc.
"We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this."
-- Antony Jay and Jonathan Lynn, "Yes Minister"
 
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glen herrmannsfeldt
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      03-15-2013
paskali <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Keith Thompson <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:


>> http://whathaveyoutried.com/


>> If this is a homework assignment, please give us your instructor's
>> e-mail address so credit can be properly given.


> That is the same that tell me to write the main function as "main()"
> and no more.


>> One clue: the word you're looking for is "sort".


> The standard English out there is UK English and NOT US English
> that say "Teacher" and not "Instructor".


Except that it is often a TA.
Or maybe even a computer.

Maybe there should be something for C like:

http://practiceit.cs.washington.edu/

-- glen
 
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Keith Thompson
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      03-15-2013
"paskali" <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:
> Keith Thompson <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> http://whathaveyoutried.com/
>>
>> If this is a homework assignment, please give us your instructor's
>> e-mail address so credit can be properly given.

>
> That is the same that tell me to write the main function as "main()"
> and no more.


My point, if it wasn't clear enough, is that it appears that you're
basically asking us to do your homework for you, without showing any
effort of your own. Do you disagree with that assessment?

>> One clue: the word you're looking for is "sort".

>
> The standard English out there is UK English and NOT US English that say
> "Teacher" and not "Instructor".


How is that relevant, or even true? Both "teacher" and "instructor"
are perfectly good English words. Was the meaning unclear?

I don't actually want your instructor's e-mail address. My point
was that if we're going to do the work for you, there's no reason
for you to get any of the credit. (I was being sarcastic.)

--
Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) (E-Mail Removed) <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
Working, but not speaking, for JetHead Development, Inc.
"We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this."
-- Antony Jay and Jonathan Lynn, "Yes Minister"
 
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James Kuyper
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      03-15-2013
On 03/15/2013 04:35 PM, paskali wrote:
> Keith Thompson <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> http://whathaveyoutried.com/
>>
>> If this is a homework assignment, please give us your instructor's
>> e-mail address so credit can be properly given.

>
> That is the same that tell me to write the main function as "main()"
> and no more.


You're asking for help, without apparently having made any attempt to
solve the problem yourself. As a result, you're receiving a lot of
well-deserved disrespect. Mark Bluemel's second message had already
given you all the help you should need to get started on the problem, so
Keith concentrated on explaining what was wrong with the way you were
approaching it.

All you need to do, in order to get some much more helpful responses, is
to review the web site that Mark referred you to, make a decent attempt
to write your own sorting routine, and if it fails, come back here with
the text of your program, and information about how it failed. You'll
find plenty of people here willing to help you figure out the problem.
You won't find many who'll solve the problem for you.

Getting help without having to work for it generally requires cash.
You'll find quite a few people who'll be quite happy to do the work for
you, for sufficient cash.

>> One clue: the word you're looking for is "sort".

>
> The standard English out there is UK English and NOT US English that say
> "Teacher" and not "Instructor".


No, there is no standard which mandates the use of UK English outside
the UK, or at least, none whose authority is widely recognized by those
who speak other dialects of English. There's a LOT more people who speak
those other dialects, than there are who speak UK English. If the
English hadn't wanted to deal with a lot of foreign dialects of English,
they shouldn't have conquered and colonized so many foreign lands.

Can you provide a citation for your claim that there's a UK/US
distinction between those words? I never noticed any such distinction
while I studied at Cambridge. The dictionaries I've checked don't mark
either word as having different meanings in those two dialects. I'd
expect most speakers of either dialect to recognize both words as
near-synonyms: the definition I found for "instructor" was "One who
instructs; a teacher".
 
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Malcolm McLean
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      03-16-2013
On Friday, March 15, 2013 9:40:02 PM UTC, James Kuyper wrote:
> On 03/15/2013 04:35 PM, paskali wrote:


> Can you provide a citation for your claim that there's a UK/US
> distinction between those words? I never noticed any such distinction
> while I studied at Cambridge. The dictionaries I've checked don't mark
> either word as having different meanings in those two dialects.
>

Dictionaries don't normally tell you anything that's politically or socially interesting about words.
In UK English a "teacher" represents a relationship of superiority on the part of the teacher. "Instructor" tends to denote a short term, limited, practical arrangement. So a Cambridge don would never be an "instructor", a lab technician showing you how to use the Beowulf cluster might well be.
In the US I've noted "instructor" is used slightly more freely.
 
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