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Getting an html file from a online html document and converting itback to code.

 
 
Patrick Rutledge
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      01-31-2013
Hi there,
I'm taking an object oriented programming class and my professor assigned an assignment in which the skeleton is given in an online html document.

We are using the BlueJ IDE.

I am not sure how to get the code from the html document online.

Any help would be appreciated.
 
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Lew
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      01-31-2013
On Wednesday, January 30, 2013 6:27:48 PM UTC-8, Patrick Rutledge wrote:
> I'm taking an object oriented programming class and my professor assigned an assignment
> in which the skeleton is given in an online html document.>
>
> We are using the BlueJ IDE.
>
> I am not sure how to get the code from the html document online.


Open your editor or IDE editor window.

Create an editor window for your code.

Open the assignment document in a browser.

Using your mouse or keyboard (shift+arrows), in the browser window
highlight the code you want to paste into your editor.

Press Control-C ("apple"-C on Macs), or use the context menu and select "Copy".
This will copy the text into your system clipboard.

Click into your editor window.

Press Control-V ("apple"-V on Macs), or use the context menu and select "Paste".

The code is now in your editor window.

Use your editor's "Save" feature.

--
Lew

 
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Roedy Green
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      01-31-2013
On Wed, 30 Jan 2013 18:27:48 -0800 (PST), Patrick Rutledge
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote, quoted or indirectly quoted
someone who said :

>I am not sure how to get the code from the html document online.


you can look at the code in a browser, then copy paste it into your
IDE and save it in a *.java file.
--
Roedy Green Canadian Mind Products http://mindprod.com
The first 90% of the code accounts for the first 90% of the development time.
The remaining 10% of the code accounts for the other 90% of the development
time.
~ Tom Cargill Ninety-ninety Law
 
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Patrick Rutledge
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      01-31-2013
The code supplied is not simply code, it is in the form of documentation(I think that is the right term). It appears in the form represented in the linked image.
http://www.time-tripper.com/uipatter...ns/javadoc.gif
 
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Jim Gibson
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      01-31-2013
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Lew
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:


> Press Control-C ("apple"-C on Macs), or use the context menu and select
> "Copy".
> This will copy the text into your system clipboard.
>
> Click into your editor window.
>
> Press Control-V ("apple"-V on Macs), or use the context menu and select
> "Paste".


It is now generally called the "Command" key (?, U+2318, clover-leaf,
or "splat" symbol) on Apple keyboards. No more Apple key.

--
Jim Gibson
 
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FredK
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      01-31-2013
On Thursday, January 31, 2013 10:47:18 AM UTC-8, Patrick wrote:
> The code supplied is not simply code, it is in the form of documentation(I think that is the right term). It appears in the form represented in the linked image. http://www.time-tripper.com/uipatter...ns/javadoc.gif


Your professor has given you the API; it is your task to write the code
 
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John B. Matthews
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      01-31-2013
In article <310120131051247563%(E-Mail Removed)>,
Jim Gibson <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Lew
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
> > Press Control-C ("apple"-C on Macs), or use the context menu
> > and select "Copy". This will copy the text into your system
> > clipboard.
> >
> > Click into your editor window.
> >
> > Press Control-V ("apple"-V on Macs), or use the context menu
> > and select "Paste".

>
> It is now generally called the "Command" key (?, U+2318, clover-
> leaf, or "splat" symbol) on Apple keyboards. No more Apple key.


In Java, the Toolkit method, getMenuShortcutKeyMask(), returns
Event.META_MASK on Mac OS X; it returns Event.CTRL_MASK on Windows
and Linux.

The Unicode code point U+2318 is named 'PLACE OF INTEREST SIGN':

<http://www.fileformat.info/info/unicode/char/2318/index.htm>

More than a few locals call it "pretzel", as in "Try pretzel-
option-8 to zoom in," but I can see the appeal of "splat."

My old, full-travel, mechanical Apple keyboard has an apple and a
splat on each meta key.

--
John B. Matthews
trashgod at gmail dot com
<http://sites.google.com/site/drjohnbmatthews>
 
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Roedy Green
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      01-31-2013
On Thu, 31 Jan 2013 10:47:18 -0800 (PST), Patrick Rutledge
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote, quoted or indirectly quoted
someone who said :

>http://www.time-tripper.com/uipatter...ns/javadoc.gif


that looks like Javadoc. It is not code but detailed documentation on
how to use some class. You still need a jar or the *.java files
before your code can use those described methods.
--
Roedy Green Canadian Mind Products http://mindprod.com
The first 90% of the code accounts for the first 90% of the development time.
The remaining 10% of the code accounts for the other 90% of the development
time.
~ Tom Cargill Ninety-ninety Law
 
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