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Does any camera come with a laser pointer?

 
 
Tony Cooper
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      01-19-2013
On Sat, 19 Jan 2013 11:03:54 -0800, Savageduck
<savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:

>The old Cessna 185's haven't been built since 1985 and they have all
>been retired now. A 185 was a regular part of enforcement on the
>stretch of 101 South of King City, and usually flew out of Paso Robles,
>so range wasn't a big concern. They also fly the 46 and 41 beat East of
>Paso Robles to I-5 and back. Fuel costs for the 185's ran $70-$85 per
>hour, The 206's will be lucky to get $150 per hour.
>Paso Robles has one of the 206's and a Eurocopter AS350 based there.


Orange County (Florida) has just purchased two drones for $50,000.
They are not intended for traffic control. They fly only up to 100
feet above the ground and cannot remain aloft more than 15 minutes.

I can't see why more sophisticated models couldn't be used for traffic
control, though.

--
Tony Cooper, Orlando FL
 
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nospam
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      01-19-2013
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Tony Cooper
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> Orange County (Florida) has just purchased two drones for $50,000.
> They are not intended for traffic control. They fly only up to 100
> feet above the ground and cannot remain aloft more than 15 minutes.


not yet approved for flying. they are hoping for summer.

> I can't see why more sophisticated models couldn't be used for traffic
> control, though.


money.
 
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nospam
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      01-19-2013
In article <2013011911035494091-savageduck1@REMOVESPAMmecom>,
Savageduck <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:

> In terms of using Radar detectors I have kept it quite simple and I use
> an Escort Passport II which gives me all I need, though I also carry an
> ID and badge which identifies me as a retired Lieutenant. I am well
> aware of the various advances in many of the detector systems.


a cop using a radar detector?? that's amusing, but the badge gets you a
free pass.

anyway, there is no such model, passport ii. there are over two dozen
models with the passport name, almost all of which have a 4 digit
number, e.g., passport 8500.

by the way, escort is owned by a venture capital company and is nothing
at all like the old cincinnati microwave who created the original
passport (no numbers) and went bankrupt in 1997.
<http://www.falconheadcapital.com/page/portfolio>

> >> On to of that they have been known to use another non-radar method of
> >> checking speeds, aircraft. Those little birddogs can be very sneaky,

> >
> > i'm well aware of that.
> >
> > here's a fun one, 130 mph, exited the highway and then followed on
> > surface streets, ultimately being arrested:
> > <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RC9d66Tf-OE>

>
> Good team work, a good example of how it should be done. This is a case
> of an idiot with more money than brains.


i'm curious if they ever found the other guy, the one he was racing.

> >> and a radar detector is not much help

> >
> > i never said a radar detector is a guarantee. nothing is. radar and
> > lidar guns are not perfect either, nor are planes. even driving at or
> > below the speed limit is not a guarantee.

>
> At one point the planes were using highway reference marks and
> stopwatches, but the Courts deemed those to be unconstitutional "Speed
> traps" so that is no longer done. They now use pacing and VASCAR II. I
> have no idea of what they will be using in the 206's.


yep. most places have timing marks on the road, which is a clue that
there might be a plane overhead although it's still relatively rare
compared to ground enforcement. the planes also have a lower stall
speed so they can better pace traffic.

> > there are also apps such as waze, which has crowd sourced traffic
> > information, and can (and often does) include reports of cops. it
> > doesn't matter if the cop is running radar or waiting for someone in a
> > plane to tell him which car to follow. either way, a police icon shows
> > up on the map.

>
> However, not everybody has a detector, or a smart phone, or has Waze
> installed, or uses it if they do.


true, but not everyone needs to.

it only takes one person to see a cop and report it to waze. the more
cars that go by, the higher the chances that someone with a smartphone
and running waze saw it. don't forget, it can be a car in *any*
direction.

> You with your iPhone ownership and interest in Radar/Laser detectors
> might be aware of iRadar.
> < http://cobrairadar.com/ >


i'm well aware of it. escort has a similar (and very buggy) product and
sued cobra because of iradar. cobra detectors are also not particularly
good. there is also an android version.
 
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nospam
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      01-20-2013
In article <2013011915342840194-savageduck1@REMOVESPAMmecom>,
Savageduck <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:

> > anyway, there is no such model, passport ii. there are over two dozen
> > models with the passport name, almost all of which have a 4 digit
> > number, e.g., passport 8500.

>
> My fingers were working faster than my brain. I have the Escort Solo 3.


that's a battery operated cordless unit. to save battery, the receiver
cycles on and off, giving it high latencies and effectively, a shorter
range.

> >>> there are also apps such as waze, which has crowd sourced traffic
> >>> information, and can (and often does) include reports of cops. it
> >>> doesn't matter if the cop is running radar or waiting for someone in a
> >>> plane to tell him which car to follow. either way, a police icon shows
> >>> up on the map.
> >>
> >> However, not everybody has a detector, or a smart phone, or has Waze
> >> installed, or uses it if they do.

> >
> > true, but not everyone needs to.
> >
> > it only takes one person to see a cop and report it to waze. the more
> > cars that go by, the higher the chances that someone with a smartphone
> > and running waze saw it. don't forget, it can be a car in *any*
> > direction.

>
> However it still takes an smart phone with Waze installed and operating
> to receive the benefit of the notification. The individual might be
> reporting to few, and more likely no other drivers on that stretch of
> road.


sure, but someone who is intent on speeding and avoiding speed traps is
likely to be using waze, along with other systems.

> ...and while there are laws in most states, especially in my case of
> California against the use of cell phones held to the head or texting,
> I wonder what the distraction of using an App might bring.


waze would not be used with a phone held to one's head.

the phone would be on the dashboard in a mount of some sort and is
really no different than a gps.

> While I have Waze installed in my iPhone, I find myself using my car
> manufactured installed GPS and the integrated BlueTooth works really
> well.


i've tried waze navigation a couple of times and was not too impressed.
i much prefer an actual gps app or preferably, a dedicated gps. waze is
useful for realtime traffic, collisions and police reports.

> >> You with your iPhone ownership and interest in Radar/Laser detectors
> >> might be aware of iRadar.
> >> < http://cobrairadar.com/ >

> >
> > i'm well aware of it. escort has a similar (and very buggy) product and
> > sued cobra because of iradar. cobra detectors are also not particularly
> > good. there is also an android version.

>
> I did not buy.


nor did i.
 
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Peter
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      01-20-2013
On 1/18/2013 2:00 AM, nospam wrote:

<snip>
>
> pros mostly stick to nikon/canon for a number of reasons.
>


I guess no pros use Hassies or Leicas.
And here I always thought th choice of camera depends in large part on
the job to be done.

--
PeterN
 
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Robert Coe
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      01-20-2013
On Sat, 19 Jan 2013 21:49:46 -0500, Peter <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
: On 1/18/2013 2:00 AM, nospam wrote:
:
: <snip>
: >
: > pros mostly stick to nikon/canon for a number of reasons.
: >
:
: I guess no pros use Hassies or Leicas.
: And here I always thought th choice of camera depends in large part on
: the job to be done.

Truthfully, I'd be surprised if very many pros used Leicas these days. Those
who know more about such things than I do say that Leicas are well made and
have great glass. I don't doubt that's correct, but they're absurdly
overpriced and lack some nifty features that one expects on a modern camera. I
don't think I've ever seen a pro using a Leica, and those I've heard discuss
their equipment seem to favor Canons and Nikons (and the occasional
Hasselblad). I guess Nospam is more right than wrong this time.

The architectural photographer I heard lecture last week spoke wistfully of
the view cameras he used for most of his career. He switched to digital (a
Canon 1Ds) when his sources of film started drying up. (He went on to say that
he's become a convert to digital and wouldn't go back, even if he could.)

Bob
 
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nospam
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      01-20-2013
In article <50fb5b47$0$10762$(E-Mail Removed)-secrets.com>, Peter
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> > pros mostly stick to nikon/canon for a number of reasons.

>
> I guess no pros use Hassies or Leicas.
> And here I always thought th choice of camera depends in large part on
> the job to be done.


do you not understand what the word mostly means?

in any event, nowhere near as many pros use hasselblad or leica.
 
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Wolfgang Weisselberg
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      01-20-2013
Alfred Molon <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
> Whisky-dave says...
>> Pros tend to go for solid relible products rather than the lastest thing unless of course ut';s very useful.


> A tiltable screen *is* very useful.


Depends very much on what you do. The look of "shot from below"
hasn't been in for some decades for people photography, ever
since good eye-level viewfinders (instead of look-down-onto
viewfinders) have become common.

OTOH you can probably by now connect the HDMI output of the
camera to a wearable viewfinder, worn like glasses, when you
want to frame frogs level on the ground or want to shoot over
the heads of the mob in front of you ...

-Wolfgang
 
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Wolfgang Weisselberg
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      01-20-2013
Robert Coe <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> On Thu, 17 Jan 2013 21:48:47 +0000, Kennedy McEwen <(E-Mail Removed)>


>: Just because you can't see an infrared laser doesn't make it safe! Quite
>: the opposite, an IR laser beam doesn't provoke a blink reaction or
>: contraction of the eye pupil, as a visible laser would. Consequently
>: the laser gets focussed on the retina without any natural restriction,
>: causing much greater retinal damage. You don't get into the so called
>: "eye safe" region until you are up around 1.5um, well beyond the
>: response cut-off of silicon so it wouldn't show up on the EVF. Even
>: then, the "eye-safety" is only achieved by absorption of the beam
>: through the vitreous humour (the internal fluid in the eye) which isn't
>: total, so there are still dangerous levels especially at close
>: distances. For example, infrared laser rangefinders have minimum eye
>: safe ranges.


> And any energy absorbed in the vitreous humor expresses itself as heat, and
> artifically heating up the eyeball isn't usually considered desirable.


Homework: Guestimate the size of the eyeball and from that
the amount of vitreous humor. Guestimate how much energy
you'll need to heat up the vitreous humor by 1 degree Celsius,
assuming no heat can be transferred out of it. Calculate how
long a typical IR laser needs to archive that.

-Wolfgang
 
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Wolfgang Weisselberg
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      01-20-2013
nick c <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> On 1/18/2013 1:13 PM, Michael Black wrote:


>> But magazines like Popular Science used to have projects like how to
>> make a pistol grip for your camera. Since I can picture those, I can
>> even picture a sort of rifle grip, the stock against your arm and then a
>> place to attach the camera.


> I think such devices are still commercially available. I've been
> thinking of getting one of those contraptions 'cause aging and shaking
> seem to be synonymous. Then-again, I wonder if the anti-gun people would
> be upset if someone publicly shouldered anything that looked like a gun
> being aimed. One would expect common sense to prevail. However
> ...(Shrug).


No, but you'd probably be shot on sight by some overzealous
peacekeeper who thought you'd be going to kill anyone.
They'll tell the judge you'd had a huge smoothbore rifle or
a miniature bazooka or something and they'll go free, too.

-Wolfgang
 
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