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Freeware that will split large picture databases into DVD-sizedportions for burning?

 
 
Tony Cooper
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      01-02-2013
On Wed, 2 Jan 2013 08:44:53 -0800, Savageduck
<savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:

>On 2013-01-02 08:14:02 -0800, Tony Cooper <(E-Mail Removed)> said:
>
>> On Wed, 2 Jan 2013 06:49:09 -0800, Savageduck
>> <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:
>>
>>> On 2013-01-02 05:04:01 -0800, DanP <(E-Mail Removed)> said:
>>>
>>>> On Tue, 01 Jan 2013 03:35:45 -0500, nospam wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Tony Cooper
>>>>> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> That's the way of this group, Brian. If you are not doing things the
>>>>>> way certain other people do them, they will tell you how wrong you are.
>>>>>> SavageDuck will tell you, but in a polite and informative way. nospam
>>>>>> will rudely tell you that you are a foolish Luddite who will not let
>>>>>> the computer do the work for you.
>>>>>
>>>>> tony will let you do stupid things that will end up hurting you in the
>>>>> long run. he doesn't actually care if you lose data.
>>>>
>>>> Tony just told him to go the HDD way but he knows that it not happen.
>>>>
>>>> If you care if he loses his data you have to get your point across and
>>>> antagonising will never help.
>>>>
>>>> DanP
>>>
>>> The issue is, not whether Tony, or any of us care if Brian loses his
>>> data, it is Brian's outright rejection of good advice, given in the
>>> various expressions of sincerity each of us have been able to muster.

>>
>> Why is there anything wrong with Brian rejecting advice?

>
>Not a thing. Just the manner of his rejection.
>
>> Brian evidently has a system that he's comfortable with that works for him.
>> He didn't ask for suggestions for a better system; he asked if there
>> is software around that would make one step in his present system a
>> bit easier.

>
>So, just because he ask for software to make his bad method easier,
>does not mean that it is bad form to point out that his particular
>method is not good, even with good software assistance. Especially with
>the quantity of data he wants to backup.
>

It's not bad form to point out other ways to back-up. It is bad form
to insist that the person should change his ways despite the person
indicating that he doesn't want to change.

>> There were a few suggestions about what software might do this, but
>> the discussion turned to suggestions about another system. It wasn't
>> just a discussion, either. nospam, in his usual bullying bombastic
>> style, insulted the man six ways from the middle for not seeing the
>> wisdom of nospam's way of doing things.

>
>...and did you expect anything less from nospam, once the rejection was stated?
>
>> For Christ's sake...if the man wants to do it his way, let him.

>
>He is going to do what he wants regardless of any suggestions here,
>that includes your suggestion for "Nero" which at $110 is certainly not
>the freeware solution he wants.


I made the suggestion to do a free download of Nero to see if it works
the way he wants. From then on, it was up to him if he wanted to pay
the $110. I didn't try to bully him to do so.

>> He isn't necessarily going to lose any data his way. There's a
>> possibility, but there's a possibility of loss of data in any system.

>
>Agreed, but with the DVD method, the odds for a successful data
>recovery are far longer.
>
>>> Right or wrong, I try to give whatever advice I can in good faith, and
>>> all I ask is the recipient consider it. I believe Tony feels the same.
>>> Brian used the most feeble of reasons, in this of all groups, to tell
>>> us he was never going to listen to us because his age justified his
>>> position.

>>
>> That's his prerogative.

>
>Prerogative! He was never going to take any useful suggestion.


Yes, it's his prerogative. He can reject any unwanted suggestions he
wants to. He doesn't need to provide a reason to reject or a reason
that suits us. The "old man" defense is sufficient.

>>> He was determined to use the most time consuming, least convenient, and
>>> most unreliable backup method, in the face of good advice.

>>
>> Yeah, but so what? They're his images. It's his time. He can utilize
>> it any way he wants.

>
>Agreed. However one can only suggest a more efficient method.


And that is what should have been done...suggest, inform, and stop
there. Stop short of using words like "stupid" (not that you did).

>> I think you, and others, did the right thing in bringing up other ways
>> to back-up his images. That could have been helpful to him. It
>> stopped being the right thing, though, when it became an insulting
>> dialog because Brian wasn't interested in following the suggestions.

>
>The point is, it was not so much his rejection of the suggestions
>given, but the manner of the rejection, and the "I'm an old man"
>justification for his position which irked me.


You don't think some of the responses could have irked him?

Let's say you are planning a visit to Florida, Duck, landing in
Orlando and going down to Key West, and ask someone for some
out-of-the-way route between the two cities.

How would you feel about a response telling you take the Florida
Turnpike and that taking local roads was a slow, inefficient and
old-fashioned way to travel?

So then you respond that you are retired and have the time, you prefer
the back roads and the photo opportunities, and you've always liked to
take back roads. The "old man" defense.

Then, you get a response saying you are wasting gas, increasing your
tire wear, not taking advantage of the modern way to travel,
increasing your chance of an accident, and generally being stupid for
not using the Turnpike.

Might you be a bit irked?

Might you never have intended to take any advice about using the
Turnpike?


--
Tony Cooper, Orlando FL
 
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nospam
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Posts: n/a
 
      01-02-2013
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Tony Cooper
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> It's not bad form to point out other ways to back-up. It is bad form
> to insist that the person should change his ways despite the person
> indicating that he doesn't want to change.


it's bad form to let someone continue on a path to disaster.

you obviously don't care what happens.

> Let's say you are planning a visit to Florida, Duck, landing in
> Orlando and going down to Key West, and ask someone for some
> out-of-the-way route between the two cities.
>
> How would you feel about a response telling you take the Florida
> Turnpike and that taking local roads was a slow, inefficient and
> old-fashioned way to travel?
>
> So then you respond that you are retired and have the time, you prefer
> the back roads and the photo opportunities, and you've always liked to
> take back roads. The "old man" defense.
>
> Then, you get a response saying you are wasting gas, increasing your
> tire wear, not taking advantage of the modern way to travel,
> increasing your chance of an accident, and generally being stupid for
> not using the Turnpike.
>
> Might you be a bit irked?


not a good analogy.

a better analogy would be that the route you picked goes through bad
neighborhoods and you really don't want to go there, particularly in an
easy to pick out rental car and especially at night. you might not come
back alive.

finding out just how stupid it is could be a live saver.
 
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me
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      01-02-2013
WinRAR.


On Tue, 1 Jan 2013 01:46:03 +0000 (UTC), Brian Hofflinger
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>Everyone must have a similar problem in splitting up large directories of
>directories on external USB drives into DVD-sized (4.7GB) collections for
>backup onto DVD media.
>
>How do you backup if you don't move photo & video directories around
>manually?
>
>MORE INFORMATION:
>I take tons of pictures & videos of the kids & family just like you do.
>
>The files each go in a directory, more or less organized by name.
>It's time to back it up to DVD media when the 500GB (or 1TB) disks fill
>up.
>
>I can MANUALLY size an arrangement of directories to something less than
>4.7 GB, then MOVE that selection to a spot, and then BURN them. After
>burning them, I then move them elsewhere, and work on the next set of
>file-intensive directories.
>
>(Note: Without moving back and forth, things get confusing really fast.)
>
>All this sizing, arranging, moving, burning, and moving on is tedious.
>
>QUESTION:
>Is there freeware out there that can burn an entire collection to
>multiple independent DVD disks?
>
>NOTE: A bigger disk isn't a solution (I've been doing that for years).


 
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Tony Cooper
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      01-02-2013
On Wed, 02 Jan 2013 13:02:53 -0500, nospam <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Tony Cooper
><(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> It's not bad form to point out other ways to back-up. It is bad form
>> to insist that the person should change his ways despite the person
>> indicating that he doesn't want to change.

>
>it's bad form to let someone continue on a path to disaster.


Bullshit. There's no disaster involved. People have been backing up
on CDs and DVDs for years. Before that, they were backing up on
diskettes and ZIP drives, and before that, tapes. We don't have a
field of disaster out there of lost data.

There's a possibility of a problem, but that possibility exists no
matter how we back-up. It's more likely to have a "disaster" by
accidently deleting images in a back-up process.

We don't have the ability to "let", or not let, a person to do
anything. I think you come across as a semi-literate fool that hasn't
mastered the Shift key, but it's not within my power to not to let you
continue to do this.

>you obviously don't care what happens.


Care? Brian's an "old guy"; a grown-up. He's got this far in life
making his own decisions. I don't see what caring has to do with it.

I don't believe that your posts are because you "care". You just
can't stand someone not thinking that what you recommend is the only
path to take.

>> Let's say you are planning a visit to Florida, Duck, landing in
>> Orlando and going down to Key West, and ask someone for some
>> out-of-the-way route between the two cities.
>>
>> How would you feel about a response telling you take the Florida
>> Turnpike and that taking local roads was a slow, inefficient and
>> old-fashioned way to travel?
>>
>> So then you respond that you are retired and have the time, you prefer
>> the back roads and the photo opportunities, and you've always liked to
>> take back roads. The "old man" defense.
>>
>> Then, you get a response saying you are wasting gas, increasing your
>> tire wear, not taking advantage of the modern way to travel,
>> increasing your chance of an accident, and generally being stupid for
>> not using the Turnpike.
>>
>> Might you be a bit irked?

>
>not a good analogy.
>
>a better analogy would be that the route you picked goes through bad
>neighborhoods and you really don't want to go there, particularly in an
>easy to pick out rental car and especially at night. you might not come
>back alive.
>
>finding out just how stupid it is could be a live saver.


It would be appropriate to warn him of the neighborhood, to inform him
of the conditions, but Duck's a grown-up, too. He wouldn't want me
trying to bully him and make him look stupid. Maybe he wants to shoot
some "street" shots.

No analogy of mine would suit you. Anyone who doesn't follow your own
path is automatically wrong in your little mind.
--
Tony Cooper, Orlando FL
 
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Wally
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      01-02-2013
On Wed, 02 Jan 2013 15:01:47 -0500, me <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>WinRAR.


Simple and effective.

Will split the compressed volume into convenient parts as specified by
the user.

And makes recovery records, which is very useful for archival storage,
especially on DVDs which tend to develop bad sectors.

W
 
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Mayayana
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      01-02-2013
| >it makes no sense to have multiple partitions anymore unless you need
| >to boot off different system versions for development.
|
| I'm not sure that I agre with you. I have always regarded my data as
| falling into two categories: 'system' and 'data'. 'Data' is the stuff
| I want to preserve and which I back up religiously. 'System' are the
| bits which are in constant flux and which have to be recreated from
| scratch. With Windows that includes all those things which require to
| be written to the Registry.
|
| Basically, I have all software writtent to drive C: and data to drive
| D:. D: is the drive which I back up religiously. I'm resigned to the
| fact that if anything happens to C: I have to laboriously reconstruct
| it, but I would have to do that anyway.

I also use multiple partitions as a way to organize for
data backup. All the most important things -- files
worked on in different programs, personal software
settings from the Application Data folders, email, etc. --
fit on a small partition that I write to CD periodically.
That makes it easy to find and update the things that
need frequent backup. Then I have a partition for
graphics, a partition for programming docs and general
documentation, a partition for general resources like
large software installers, etc. I can then more easily
track how often I back those up. Just a matter of personal
preference, though. A separate data partition(s) is important,
but whether it's one or many is not critical.


 
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nospam
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Posts: n/a
 
      01-02-2013
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Tony Cooper
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> >> It's not bad form to point out other ways to back-up. It is bad form
> >> to insist that the person should change his ways despite the person
> >> indicating that he doesn't want to change.

> >
> >it's bad form to let someone continue on a path to disaster.

>
> Bullshit. There's no disaster involved.


it's always a disaster when important and irreplaceable files are lost.

> People have been backing up
> on CDs and DVDs for years. Before that, they were backing up on
> diskettes and ZIP drives, and before that, tapes. We don't have a
> field of disaster out there of lost data.


bullshit right back. none of those are particularly reliable and more
importantly, very few people bother backing up because doing so is
work. backing up is not fun, so people didn't do it.

who looks forward to burning 200+ dvds for a terabyte hard drive? even
burning 5 dvds is a pain in the ass, nevermind 200.

the solution is to automate it so users don't need to do anything
special. if it happens automatically in the background, it gets done.
otherwise, it won't, which means people *will* lose data.

> There's a possibility of a problem, but that possibility exists no
> matter how we back-up. It's more likely to have a "disaster" by
> accidently deleting images in a back-up process.


nope. by burning hundreds of dvds and moving files and folders around,
that chance goes *way* up. plus there is the unreliability of dvds.

it's a bad idea.
 
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nospam
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      01-02-2013
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Eric Stevens
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> >> I like to back up work and settings to partitions on a
> >> second hard disk, then write that periodically to CD. Nothing
> >> I do is so critical that it needs instant RAID backup. I prefer
> >> to just have a second hard disk with partitions that I can use.
> >> ANNEX and STORAGE are on drive #1. CLOSET, ATTIC and
> >> BACK 40 are on drive #2. C drive is only a 3GB partition
> >> with software installed, so that if I lose Windows I can restore
> >> a disk image and be back up quickly without affecting data. In
> >> these times of 100+ GB hard disks it makes no sense to have
> >> a single partition.

> >
> >it makes no sense to have multiple partitions anymore unless you need
> >to boot off different system versions for development.

>
> I'm not sure that I agre with you. I have always regarded my data as
> falling into two categories: 'system' and 'data'. 'Data' is the stuff
> I want to preserve and which I back up religiously. 'System' are the
> bits which are in constant flux and which have to be recreated from
> scratch. With Windows that includes all those things which require to
> be written to the Registry.
>
> Basically, I have all software writtent to drive C: and data to drive
> D:. D: is the drive which I back up religiously. I'm resigned to the
> fact that if anything happens to C: I have to laboriously reconstruct
> it, but I would have to do that anyway.


why not back up both?

why have the partition at all and back up everything?
 
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nospam
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Posts: n/a
 
      01-02-2013
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Eric Stevens
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> >> External HDDs most certainly do and unreliable it is they can be too.
> >> I've gone through two Seagates and am now relying on a Samsung which
> >> (touch wood) seems to be outlasting the other two combined.

> >
> >Have you ever opened one of those boxes? The HDD is standard, and can
> >be plugged in anywhere, including a stand-alone box such as:
> >
> > http://www.win-star.com/eshop/goods.php?id=81

>
> You are suggesting that its the box which is faulty while the HDD
> inside is still OK? You may well be right


he is right. the hard drive is almost guaranteed to be perfectly fine.

> but all I could quickly
> find to replace the faulty units was boxes of 50% more capacity at 2/3
> the price. It was a no-brainer really.


even more of a no brainer to replace just the enclosure, since that's
all that got fried.

why replace the hard drive when it's still functional?

of course, if you *want* more capacity, that's another story, but that
has nothing to do with power surges or other damage.
 
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nospam
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-02-2013
In article <kc2b2j$ots$(E-Mail Removed)>, Mayayana
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> I also use multiple partitions as a way to organize for
> data backup. All the most important things -- files
> worked on in different programs, personal software
> settings from the Application Data folders, email, etc. --
> fit on a small partition that I write to CD periodically.
> That makes it easy to find and update the things that
> need frequent backup.


huh? why do *you* have to find the things to backup? that's what backup
software does. a computer can easily find modified files a whole lot
faster than you can, and more accurately.

> Then I have a partition for
> graphics, a partition for programming docs and general
> documentation, a partition for general resources like
> large software installers, etc. I can then more easily
> track how often I back those up. Just a matter of personal
> preference, though. A separate data partition(s) is important,
> but whether it's one or many is not critical.


what a mess.

simply search for all files modified after the time you did the last
backup. those are the files that changed. backup programs do that
automatically, and track it for you.
 
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