Velocity Reviews - Computer Hardware Reviews

Velocity Reviews > Newsgroups > Computing > Digital Photography > Freeware that will split large picture databases into DVD-sizedportions for burning?

Reply
Thread Tools

Freeware that will split large picture databases into DVD-sizedportions for burning?

 
 
nospam
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-01-2013
In article <kbujeq$39i$(E-Mail Removed)>, Brian Hofflinger
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> > hard drive *enclosures* may have custom power supplies but that's for
> > the enclosure and not the drive.

>
> This.


then buy an enclosure that either has a built in power supply and takes
a standard ac cord just like a computer, or get an enclosure that uses
a normal +12v barrel plug rather than some weird multi-pin plug.

not that it matters because you can buy replacement adapters even if
they have multiple pins, or worst case, replace the enclosure.

anyway, in the unlikely event the power supply fails, the data on the
hard drive will be fine. you haven't lost data like you claimed you
did.

and what happens if the power supply for the dvd drive fails? dvd
enclosures frequently use the very same power adapters, with the
multiple pin plugs.
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
nospam
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-01-2013
In article <201301010554186752-savageduck1@REMOVESPAMmecom>, Savageduck
<savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:

> >> If you are using the HDD's how the Hell are you losing power supplies?

> >
> > The older Western Digital 1T drives had proprietary (or DIN)
> > connectors, well before
> > USB disk drives became common.

>
> So?
> I have three LaCie enclosures which have proprietary connectors for
> their power supplies. For some strange reason I have yet to lose any of
> those power supplies. Nice solid enclosures, but I concede, the power
> supply connection was somewhat odd and non-standard.
> ...and most importantly in my case, the power supplies are not lost.


and in the unlikely event one does fail, you already have two spare
adapters (you don't need all three drives powered on at the same time
if they're backups), and you can no doubt order a new adapter anyway.

or worst case, you get a new enclosure and swap the drives.
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
nospam
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-01-2013
In article <kbuj84$39i$(E-Mail Removed)>, Brian Hofflinger
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> > doesn't ease of use matter to you?
> > why are you trying to do things the hard way?

>
> To answer your questions, ease of use does matter.


then why are you picking the most difficult method possible?

> That's why I'm looking for a pre-existing solution for creating DVDs.
> (I've already explained why I vastly prefer DVDs over electronics.)


and others have explained why that's incredibly stupid but here it is
again:

you mentioned a 1 terabyte drive, which would be around 250 dvds (you
won't get a perfect 4.3 gig for every disc). you will also need at
least two backups to be safe, with one copy off site in case of fire,
flood, theft, etc., so that's 500 dvds.

that's a lot of dvds. where are you going to put them all? how are you
going to find anything in there?

if you update any of those photos on the hard drive, you will have to
either burn everything all over again or figure out which dvds contain
the photos that changed and update those dvds. if you make a mistake
(which is incredibly likely with 500 dvds), you will lose files.

as i and others have said, a much better way is buy a second terabyte
hard drive (and third for the offsite copy), clone it and you're done.

any time there's a change you clone it again. the subsequent clones
take a minute or two because it only copies what changes (and the
computer figures that out).

leave the offsite drive at work, at a friend's house or even in a bank
vault. rotate that every couple of weeks or whatever is appropriate for
how often you add/change photos.

and you should be backing up the rest of your files too, not just
photos. certainly you have other important data as well.

> The reason I'm looking for freeware is that, IMHO, freeware almost always
> does the job that needs to be done - and - in the rare cases where it
> doesn't do the job fully - then (and only then) you can go out and buy
> the payware.


there are exceptions, but freeware tends to not do the job particularly
well. there is little incentive for the authors to make freeware better
than the bare minimum. free software doesn't put food on people's
tables. there is no freeware that comes anywhere close to what toast
does, or photoshop or many other software titles.

> The beauty of using the freeware first is that, by the time you realize
> the freeware doesn't do the job (which is a rarity in and of itself),
> then you know enough to know EXACTLY what you want out of the payware.


that excuse does not hold any water.

nearly everything these days has a free downloadable trial. you don't
have to pay unless you are sure it does what you need.

> In those case, 8 times out of 10, the payware doesn't do the job either!


how are you picking software? throwing darts at the wall with names on
it?

either the web site where you get the software says it does what you
need or you download a trial copy and find out yourself.
 
Reply With Quote
 
Yuhler G
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-01-2013

On article <kbtf4r$p58$(E-Mail Removed)>, Brian Hofflinger wrote:

>
> Everyone must have a similar problem in splitting up large directories of
> directories on external USB drives into DVD-sized (4.7GB) collections for
> backup onto DVD media.
>
> How do you backup if you don't move photo & video directories around
> manually?
>
> MORE INFORMATION:
> I take tons of pictures & videos of the kids & family just like you do.
>
> The files each go in a directory, more or less organized by name.
> It's time to back it up to DVD media when the 500GB (or 1TB) disks fill
> up.
>
> I can MANUALLY size an arrangement of directories to something less than
> 4.7 GB, then MOVE that selection to a spot, and then BURN them. After
> burning them, I then move them elsewhere, and work on the next set of
> file-intensive directories.
>
> (Note: Without moving back and forth, things get confusing really fast.)
>
> All this sizing, arranging, moving, burning, and moving on is tedious.
>
> QUESTION:
> Is there freeware out there that can burn an entire collection to
> multiple independent DVD disks?
>
> NOTE: A bigger disk isn't a solution (I've been doing that for years).


I'd try Cobian Backup <http://www.cobiansoft.com/> though you'd need a burning
software like ImgBurn <http://www.imgburn.com/>. This process can be automated
by Cobian Backup post backup process.

--
Best,
Yuhler G.

Please, reply preferably to the list.
Reply-To: yuhler at gmail dot com
Due to spam I'm filtering-out GoogleGroups. Sorry.
 
Reply With Quote
 
David Taylor
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-02-2013
On 01/01/2013 22:02, Eric Stevens wrote:
> On Tue, 01 Jan 2013 03:35:39 -0500, nospam <(E-Mail Removed)>
> wrote:

[]
>> hard drives do *not* have proprietary power supplies. period.

>
> External HDDs most certainly do and unreliable it is they can be too.
> I've gone through two Seagates and am now relying on a Samsung which
> (touch wood) seems to be outlasting the other two combined.


Have you ever opened one of those boxes? The HDD is standard, and can
be plugged in anywhere, including a stand-alone box such as:

http://www.win-star.com/eshop/goods.php?id=81

--
Cheers,
David
Web: http://www.satsignal.eu
 
Reply With Quote
 
DanP
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-02-2013
On Tue, 01 Jan 2013 01:46:03 +0000, Brian Hofflinger wrote:

> Everyone must have a similar problem in splitting up large directories
> of directories on external USB drives into DVD-sized (4.7GB) collections
> for backup onto DVD media.
>
> How do you backup if you don't move photo & video directories around
> manually?
>
> MORE INFORMATION:
> I take tons of pictures & videos of the kids & family just like you do.
>
> The files each go in a directory, more or less organized by name.
> It's time to back it up to DVD media when the 500GB (or 1TB) disks fill
> up.


Burning 100 DVD at once is a PITA. Keeping track of them is another PITA.
Buy portable USB HDDs, if you are lucky to have USB 3 on your computer
get USB 3 HDDs and do it in one go.

You can do it with regular 3.5" HDDs through a bay adaptor.

Backup to 2 units and keep them at different locations.

Get a NAS RAID unit and have your data accessible all the time, some
units allow up to 12Tb. Just don't think of it as a reliable backup.


DanP
 
Reply With Quote
 
DanP
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-02-2013
On Tue, 01 Jan 2013 06:04:12 +0000, Brian Hofflinger wrote:

> On Mon, 31 Dec 2012 20:52:34 -0700, Wally wrote:
>
>> What are you doing to deserve such bad luck?

>
> I'm an old man. Lost much data.
>
> Over time, all electronics go kaput.
>
> And, at the worst time.
>
> You know the rule.


Get 2 different brands of USB HDDs.
They would not be used much therefore failure risk would be low.
If you are still concerned get 3 brands. Or get slow cheap 32GB SD cards.

I bet your data loss happened because your HDD inside your computer
failed. Well, some do after a number of years. USB HDDs would see
something like a month of running time.

Besides imagine how you would retrieve data from DVDs.


DanP
 
Reply With Quote
 
DanP
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-02-2013
On Tue, 01 Jan 2013 03:35:45 -0500, nospam wrote:

> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Tony Cooper
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> That's the way of this group, Brian. If you are not doing things the
>> way certain other people do them, they will tell you how wrong you are.
>> SavageDuck will tell you, but in a polite and informative way. nospam
>> will rudely tell you that you are a foolish Luddite who will not let
>> the computer do the work for you.

>
> tony will let you do stupid things that will end up hurting you in the
> long run. he doesn't actually care if you lose data.


Tony just told him to go the HDD way but he knows that it not happen.

If you care if he loses his data you have to get your point across and
antagonising will never help.

DanP
 
Reply With Quote
 
gordo
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-02-2013
Burning 100 DVD at once is a PITA. Keeping track of them is another PITA.
Buy portable USB HDDs, if you are lucky to have USB 3 on your computer
get USB 3 HDDs and do it in one go.

You can do it with regular 3.5" HDDs through a bay adaptor.

Backup to 2 units and keep them at different locations.

Get a NAS RAID unit and have your data accessible all the time, some
units allow up to 12Tb. Just don't think of it as a reliable backup.


DanP

Has anyone addressed the problem of storing your backups offsite? Your house
could be destroyed by natural or man-made disaster; fire, earthquake, gas
explosion, etc. I have only around 12000 photos. I do back up to DVDs and
store them in a bank safety deposit box.

Of course, this is not the only way, you could have a friend store a hard
drive and you could store his.

My point is that you should consider a different location for your backups.

Gordo

 
Reply With Quote
 
Mayayana
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-02-2013
| > What are you doing to deserve such bad luck?
|
| I'm an old man. Lost much data.
| Over time, all electronics go kaput.
| And, at the worst time.
|
I'm with you. USB is good and external hard drives are
OK. RAID arrays are good in a corporate situation where
all data is critical. But one close lightning strike, power
surge, or short circuit that blows the power supply will
fry both RAID drives. I've experienced the two latter
cases. In 2001 there was a massive power failure in the
Northeast US and I didn't have a UPS. There was apparently
a giant surge as the Massachusetts power grid auto-
disconnected from the rest of the country. My PC was
running at the time. It rebooted by itself and everything
was gone.

I like to back up work and settings to partitions on a
second hard disk, then write that periodically to CD. Nothing
I do is so critical that it needs instant RAID backup. I prefer
to just have a second hard disk with partitions that I can use.
ANNEX and STORAGE are on drive #1. CLOSET, ATTIC and
BACK 40 are on drive #2. C drive is only a 3GB partition
with software installed, so that if I lose Windows I can restore
a disk image and be back up quickly without affecting data. In
these times of 100+ GB hard disks it makes no sense to have
a single partition. I also use DVDs but don't have nearly the
volume of data you're talking about. My first reaction would be,
"Why do you save so many photos, and why at such large
resolution?" But that's none of my business.

If you want to write it all to DVDs, the re-organizing
could be done with a script. I'd be surprised if there's
software specifically for that. I'd be more surprised if
there's software that will sort your folders *and* set up
a DVD queue.

But I wonder how you find your photos after you've shuffled
them around. And if you don't mind shuffling them around
then why not just store them in DVD-size folders in the first
place?


 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
problem in running a basic code in python 3.3.0 that includes HTML file Satabdi Mukherjee Python 1 04-04-2013 07:48 PM
Utility to split a WAV recording into 'tracks' (preferably freeware, even more preferably OSS) Alan NZ Computing 36 10-31-2006 01:49 AM
How to split a large avi file into smaller avi by size Avner DVD Video 1 10-31-2005 06:34 PM
[podcast] Expert panel discussion of XQuery, native XML databases, SQL/XML databases Ken North XML 0 07-14-2005 05:50 AM
Tools to extract data from SQL database and convert it into XML & insert XML data into SQL databases Harry Zoroc XML 1 07-12-2004 10:10 PM



Advertisments