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Freeware that will split large picture databases into DVD-sizedportions for burning?

 
 
Brian Hofflinger
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      01-01-2013
On Mon, 31 Dec 2012 20:43:45 -0800, Savageduck wrote:

> If you are using the HDD's how the Hell are you losing power supplies?


The older Western Digital 1T drives had proprietary (or DIN) connectors, well before
USB disk drives became common.

Over time, I learned my lesson, having bought 100MB USB drives when they first came out,
250MB, 500MB, 1TB, etc.

I agree. Buying any HDD with proprietary power supplies is crazy - but - as I said,
I'm an old man who has been there, and done that - and learned too many lessons to
repeat here.


 
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Brian Hofflinger
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      01-01-2013
On Tue, 01 Jan 2013 01:02:32 -0500, nospam wrote:

>> There 'must' be software out there to handle creating
>> independent 4.7GB directory sets for burning.

>
> roxio toast, but as i said, it's a really dumb way to go. you are
> making *way* more work for yourself.


I hadn't realized Roxio Toast was Windows & Linux freeware.
I thought all the Roxio stuff was payware.

I'll need to check it out to see if it does that you say it can.
Thanks.

 
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Tony Cooper
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      01-01-2013
On Tue, 1 Jan 2013 06:07:35 +0000 (UTC), Brian Hofflinger
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>On Mon, 31 Dec 2012 20:43:45 -0800, Savageduck wrote:
>
>> Then you are buying crappy drives. I have been buying and using drive
>> of various ages, brands and specifications for some 18 years.

>
>Well, we can argue all day about how much better your disk drives are
>than mine - but that won't get us any closer to the answer, will it?
>
>In all respect, what I'm looking for is software that will automatically
>do what I'm doing manually.
>
>I'll keep looking through the answers - as I can't be the only one.


That's the way of this group, Brian. If you are not doing things the
way certain other people do them, they will tell you how wrong you
are. SavageDuck will tell you, but in a polite and informative way.
nospam will rudely tell you that you are a foolish Luddite who will
not let the computer do the work for you.

No matter that it's you doing the work and you prefer to do it the way
you're doing it.

I don't currently use Nero to burn disks, but it seems to me that Nero
used to allow you to load what you wanted to burn even if it was too
large a group of files to burn on one disk. Nero would then burn a
disk, stop and tell you to insert another disk, and continue until
everything was burned. This means you don't have to manually break up
the files into single disk groups.

Nero claims to "Span data efficiently across multiple CDs, DVDs and
Blu-ray Discs", and I think that's what you want to do.

Nero offers a free 15 day trial, so you can try it to see.

BTW...I back up with two external HDs and Lightroom back-up, but I'm
not interested in converting you.


--
Tony Cooper, Orlando FL
 
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nospam
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      01-01-2013
In article <kbtvnp$rcp$(E-Mail Removed)>, Brian Hofflinger
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> > If you are using the HDD's how the Hell are you losing power supplies?

>
> The older Western Digital 1T drives had proprietary (or DIN) connectors, well
> before USB disk drives became common.


no they didn't. do you just make this **** up as you go along or what?

first of all, 1tb drives are relatively recent and usb is not. usb hard
drives have been around for over ten years, back when 100 gig was
'large'. there were no 1tb drives then.

second, hard drives have standard connectors, usually scsi, parallel
ata (pata) or serial ata (sata). that's how you can buy a drive and
swap it into a computer or enclosure. it only needs to be the right
physical size (3.5", 2.5" or 1.8") and interface (pata/sata).

> Over time, I learned my lesson, having bought 100MB USB drives when they
> first came out, 250MB, 500MB, 1TB, etc.


what lesson was that?

that usb can't source enough power so you have to use a dual usb cable
hack or use an off the shelf 5v power adapter?

> I agree. Buying any HDD with proprietary power supplies is crazy


it most certainly is crazy, since that's bullshit.

hard drives do *not* have proprietary power supplies. period.

they use +5v/+12v for 3.5" and +5v for 2.5". they use a standard 4 pin
molex plug for older drives or a newer sata plug (or a combo for the
laptops).

hard drive *enclosures* may have custom power supplies but that's for
the enclosure and not the drive. if one enclosure craps out you buy a
new enclosure to replace it and swap the drive. or you replace the
power adapter which is probably an off the shelf part.

or get a raid5 enclosure with hot-swappable drives. that way, if a
drive fails you just pop it out and replace it with a new drive and the
raid rebuilds the array, *without* powering down. the only way you can
lose data is if you intentionally delete it or every single drive fails
all at the same time (usually 3 or more), which is *very* unlikely.

> - but - as I said,
> I'm an old man who has been there, and done that - and learned too many lessons to
> repeat here.


in other words, you are stubborn.

suit yourself but you are making a shitload more work for yourself with
absolutely no benefit whatsoever. you are almost guaranteed to lose
data going the dvd route, even if for some perverse reason you enjoy
the hassle. the point of backups is not to lose data but to prevent it.

meanwhile, if you have multiple hard drive copies with one or more off
site, you are almost guaranteed to *never* lose data, unless the planet
explodes or something of that magnitude.

or as i said, sync it all to the cloud and let someone else worry about
backups and redundancy.
 
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nospam
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      01-01-2013
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Tony Cooper
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> That brings up my major gripe about computer design. I just bought a
> new computer. It has four USB ports on the back and two USB ports on
> the front. I have nine USB devices currently connected to computer
> and also use a USB port for my card reader and a third external HD
> that is portable. That means one of my USB ports connects to a D-Link
> USB Hub that gives me seven more USB ports.
>
> (I could use the card reader built into the computer but my physical
> layout doesn't make that convenient)
>
> The computer designers know that just about every device is going to
> require a USB port, but they only give us six. Providing 12 would add
> a few pennies to the cost, but they won't do that.


they don't do that because most people don't need anywhere near 12 usb
ports. why pay for something that almost nobody will ever use? don't
force your needs onto everyone else.

what in the hell do you have connected that you need 12 usb ports
anyway?

for my laptop i regularly use 0 usb ports and for my desktops i
regularly use 3 at the most. 12 would be insanely wasteful.

> I won't even mention that tangled mess of wires that act like
> coathangers and twist around themselves after I've gone to bed.


cable clamps.

> My printer can be set up as a wireless device,


wired network is much better and more reliable too.

> and I could use a
> wireless keyboard, mouse, and trackball, but I don't.


i don't understand the obsession with wireless keyboards. replacing
batteries is annoying and it's not like you're going to walk around the
room with a keyboard or sit 20 feet away across the room and type.

> Except when I
> have to move things around and fight the tangle, the wires don't
> bother me.


other than that.
 
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nospam
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      01-01-2013
In article <kbu0ir$rpd$(E-Mail Removed)>, Brian Hofflinger
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> >> There 'must' be software out there to handle creating
> >> independent 4.7GB directory sets for burning.

> >
> > roxio toast, but as i said, it's a really dumb way to go. you are
> > making *way* more work for yourself.

>
> I hadn't realized Roxio Toast was Windows & Linux freeware.


it's not.

> I thought all the Roxio stuff was payware.


it is, and you get what you pay for.

doesn't ease of use matter to you? why are you trying to do things the
hard way?

you said you're an old man, so why do you want all these hassles? it's
time to have the computer do work *for* you so you can go out and spend
time with your kids and probably grandkids as well and enjoy yourself
and take more pics. let the computer do the micromanagement of your
photos and backups. that's what it's good at.

> I'll need to check it out to see if it does that you say it can.


the current version definitely does. i don't remember when they added
that feature though. could have been many years ago but it's there now.
i have been using toast since astarte launched the product over 15
years ago, before adaptec bought it and long before there even was a
roxio. excellent software.
 
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nospam
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      01-01-2013
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Tony Cooper
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> That's the way of this group, Brian. If you are not doing things the
> way certain other people do them, they will tell you how wrong you
> are. SavageDuck will tell you, but in a polite and informative way.
> nospam will rudely tell you that you are a foolish Luddite who will
> not let the computer do the work for you.


tony will let you do stupid things that will end up hurting you in the
long run. he doesn't actually care if you lose data.

fortunately, there are others who realize that dvd backup is not a
backup at all and have pointed out just how much of a waste of time it
really is. yes, i may be blunt, but it's exactly correct.

not only is backing up to dvd significantly more work than other
methods, but it's far less reliable too. plus, i can't even imagine how
you can keep track of which photo is where.

dvd backup is a *really* bad idea, unless your goal is to lose data. if
so, then why even bother backing up at all. skip that entirely and save
both the time to do it and the expense of all the dvds.
 
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David Taylor
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      01-01-2013
On 01/01/2013 06:04, Brian Hofflinger wrote:
> On Mon, 31 Dec 2012 20:52:34 -0700, Wally wrote:
>
>> What are you doing to deserve such bad luck?

>
> I'm an old man. Lost much data.
>
> Over time, all electronics go kaput.
>
> And, at the worst time.
>
> You know the rule.


DVDs also fail. Which is the more reliable /today/? USB seems
reasonable standard, so power supplies shouldn't be an issue for a
while. When a new standard comes out, cloning your 1TB backup onto a
new device will likely take less time than shuffling 200 DVDs.
--
Cheers,
David
Web: http://www.satsignal.eu
 
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Brian Hofflinger
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      01-01-2013
On Tue, 01 Jan 2013 03:35:44 -0500, nospam wrote:

>> I hadn't realized Roxio Toast was Windows & Linux freeware.

> it's not.
>
>> I thought all the Roxio stuff was payware.

> it is, and you get what you pay for.
>
> doesn't ease of use matter to you?
> why are you trying to do things the hard way?


To answer your questions, ease of use does matter.
That's why I'm looking for a pre-existing solution for creating DVDs.
(I've already explained why I vastly prefer DVDs over electronics.)

The reason I'm looking for freeware is that, IMHO, freeware almost always
does the job that needs to be done - and - in the rare cases where it
doesn't do the job fully - then (and only then) you can go out and buy
the payware.

The beauty of using the freeware first is that, by the time you realize
the freeware doesn't do the job (which is a rarity in and of itself),
then you know enough to know EXACTLY what you want out of the payware.

In those case, 8 times out of 10, the payware doesn't do the job either!

 
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Brian Hofflinger
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      01-01-2013
On Tue, 01 Jan 2013 03:35:39 -0500, nospam wrote:

> hard drive *enclosures* may have custom power supplies but that's for
> the enclosure and not the drive.


This.

 
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