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Re: How do I delete photographs from an iPad?

 
 
nospam
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      11-02-2012
In article <k71j2c$po5$(E-Mail Removed)>, Mayayana
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> | Yup!
> | Along with DropBox and G-Drive, I have my own 1TB PogoPlug device with
> | my own "Cloud" server sitting right next to my home WiFi router.
> | So I use the free space on DB and G-Drive, but my primary cloud storage
> | is my PogoPlug device. My cost $99 for the PP device + $149 for the 1TB
> | HD.
> | < http://ppl.ug/gTbLRApC138/ >
>
> You're talking about something that's essentially
> file sharing software. They might market it as a
> "private cloud",


it is a private cloud.

> but the discussion started out with
> nospam's claim that nobody cares anymore about
> where their files are. I was just pointing out that
> it does, indeed, make a difference.


not for when you actually want to use the files, it doesn't.

the computer can keep track of where stuff is far better than humans
can. what matters to users is finding the documents, photos, music,
movies, etc, they want, not trying to remember what folder it's in or
what it's called.

i've seen people spend quite a bit of time looking through numerous
folders trying to find something, wondering where they put it. let the
computer do that, it's *much* better at finding it.

now if only the computer could find where i put stuff in my house.

> If you're storing
> on your external drive then you do, indeed, know
> where your files are,


no you definitely do not. the *computer* does.

> and from the sounds of it you
> recognize that commercial online storage is quite
> different from local storage.


obviously it's different. duh.
 
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Mayayana
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      11-03-2012
| > I was just pointing out that
| > it does, indeed, make a difference.
|
| not for when you actually want to use the files, it doesn't.
|
| the computer can keep track of where stuff is far better than humans
| can. what matters to users is finding the documents, photos, music,
| movies, etc, they want, not trying to remember what folder it's in or
| what it's called.
|

That makes sense for a lot of people. But what's
going on now is a deliberate conflation of your PC/device
and remote, commercial storage. That's the basic
plan with tablets. And while something like Picasa
is very helpful for a lot of people, it also dovetails
with the attempt to convert people to services.

In other words, if the location of your files is
obscured by programs like Picasa, so that you
no longer know or control the actual data storage,
then whether the data is on your PC or in online
storage quickly becomes transparent. That's what
Microsoft's and Google's free storage + services is
all about. They want for you to stop making that
distinction and gradually get used to paying them
for your computing use. Some people will, indeed,
prefer the services model, but many are being led
into it unwittingly.


 
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tony cooper
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      11-03-2012
On Sat, 03 Nov 2012 14:35:36 +1300, Eric Stevens
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>On Fri, 02 Nov 2012 16:51:05 -0700, nospam <(E-Mail Removed)>
>wrote:
>
>>In article <201211021617469530-savageduck1@REMOVESPAMmecom>, Savageduck
>><savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:
>>
>>> > You're talking about something that's essentially
>>> > file sharing software.
>>>
>>> > Sharing is just one feature of Pogoplug.
>>> > They might market it as a
>>> > "private cloud", but the discussion started out with
>>> > nospam's claim that nobody cares anymore about
>>> > where their files are.
>>>
>>> I don't know about other folks, but I do care where my files are
>>> located, that is one of the reasons my use of G-Drive is minimal.

>>
>>picking a particular cloud service versus using your own is important,
>>but that's not what i'm referring to in not caring where files are.
>>
>>my point is that users want to work with documents, photos, etc., not
>>trying to remember which file is in which folder or what the actual
>>file name was or whether it's on the internal drive or the external
>>drive, and if the latter, which external drive, etc.
>>
>>that's something a computer can do far more efficiently.
>>
>>in other words, if you want photos of niagara falls you took a couple
>>of years ago, you tap a few keys and boom, you are looking at those
>>photos. the computer can find them much faster than a human ever could.

>
>I would have quick look in 'My Photos/Places/Niagra'. It's not perfect
>but it works.


In my case, while I have and use Lightroom, the photo would have the
keyword "Vacation", the keyword for the general nature of the trip,
and the keyword for the year. The same result could be obtained by a
folder and file structure, and it would be just as fast. I wouldn't
keyword "Niagra" since that would have been only one sight on the
trip.

LR's a great photo inventory management tool for the amateur
photographer, but it's certainly not the only way photo inventory
management can be accomplished.

The big advantage, for me, is the ability to view all images without
using the keywords when I'm looking for a background like a beach
scene. I wouldn't keyword "beach", but might want to drop something
in a beach scene and don't know which trip had the right beach scene.
It makes it easier than going through a lot of folders.



--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
 
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Doug McDonald
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      11-03-2012
On 11/2/2012 6:51 PM, nospam wrote:

> my point is that users want to work with documents, photos, etc., not
> trying to remember which file is in which folder or what the actual
> file name was or whether it's on the internal drive or the external
> drive, and if the latter, which external drive, etc.
>
> that's something a computer can do far more efficiently.
>
> in other words, if you want photos of niagara falls you took a couple
> of years ago, you tap a few keys and boom, you are looking at those
> photos. the computer can find them much faster than a human ever could.
>


You are wrong unless somebody has say, oh, only 50 files.

On my main computer I have over 100,000 "document" files. There are over
5000 music files, 15,000 photo files, and over 40,000 genealogy files.
Not to mention my DNA data collection with 100,000 files.

How am I supposed to keep track of those files? A system is needed,
and how on Earth, or even how in our Galaxy, can somebody else
decide how best to arrange them? For some vacations
I have over a thousand photo files, in some cases multiple files
for one picture. How is somebody at Apple or anywhere else supposed
to be able to keep them arranged properly?

Could you explain?

Doug McDonald





 
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nospam
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      11-03-2012
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Eric Stevens
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> >my point is that users want to work with documents, photos, etc., not
> >trying to remember which file is in which folder or what the actual
> >file name was or whether it's on the internal drive or the external
> >drive, and if the latter, which external drive, etc.
> >
> >that's something a computer can do far more efficiently.
> >
> >in other words, if you want photos of niagara falls you took a couple
> >of years ago, you tap a few keys and boom, you are looking at those
> >photos. the computer can find them much faster than a human ever could.

>
> I would have quick look in 'My Photos/Places/Niagra'. It's not perfect
> but it works.


only if you put them there. what if they fall into more than one
category? what if not only is it niagara, but spouse or other family
member? what if you want only waterfall photos?

you have to remember which files are where. it quickly gets out of hand.

it's much easier when the computer figures it out.
 
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nospam
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Posts: n/a
 
      11-03-2012
In article <k720nn$1dg$(E-Mail Removed)>, Doug McDonald
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> On 11/2/2012 6:51 PM, nospam wrote:
>
> > my point is that users want to work with documents, photos, etc., not
> > trying to remember which file is in which folder or what the actual
> > file name was or whether it's on the internal drive or the external
> > drive, and if the latter, which external drive, etc.
> >
> > that's something a computer can do far more efficiently.
> >
> > in other words, if you want photos of niagara falls you took a couple
> > of years ago, you tap a few keys and boom, you are looking at those
> > photos. the computer can find them much faster than a human ever could.
> >

>
> You are wrong unless somebody has say, oh, only 50 files.


nope. it works great with tens of thousands of files.

> On my main computer I have over 100,000 "document" files. There are over
> 5000 music files, 15,000 photo files, and over 40,000 genealogy files.
> Not to mention my DNA data collection with 100,000 files.


and you know exactly which file is where??

on this laptop, there are about 1.5 million files. on my media server
there are probably 50-100 thousand songs, photos and movies. trying to
keep track of that is simply not worth the trouble when the computer
can do a much better job.

> How am I supposed to keep track of those files? A system is needed,
> and how on Earth, or even how in our Galaxy, can somebody else
> decide how best to arrange them?


that's the whole point. there's no need to arrange anything the
computer can instantly find whatever you want, wherever it is. if you
want waterfalls, you get waterfalls. if you want beethoven, you get
beethoven. i can set up a smart folder of photos taken in the last 5
days and it automatically updates.

why should humans be burdened with keeping track of what goes where
when the computer can do it *so* much faster and not get tired of
managing it?

> For some vacations
> I have over a thousand photo files, in some cases multiple files
> for one picture. How is somebody at Apple or anywhere else supposed
> to be able to keep them arranged properly?


this has nothing to do with apple. it works on windows too.
 
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nospam
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Posts: n/a
 
      11-03-2012
In article <k71tfj$isv$(E-Mail Removed)>, Mayayana
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> | > I was just pointing out that
> | > it does, indeed, make a difference.
> |
> | not for when you actually want to use the files, it doesn't.
> |
> | the computer can keep track of where stuff is far better than humans
> | can. what matters to users is finding the documents, photos, music,
> | movies, etc, they want, not trying to remember what folder it's in or
> | what it's called.
> |
>
> That makes sense for a lot of people.


yes it does. that's the whole point.

> But what's
> going on now is a deliberate conflation of your PC/device
> and remote, commercial storage. That's the basic
> plan with tablets.


no it's not the basic plan with tablets. it *can* be, if the user wants
it.

> And while something like Picasa
> is very helpful for a lot of people, it also dovetails
> with the attempt to convert people to services.


oh please. nobody is forcing anything on anyone.

> In other words, if the location of your files is
> obscured by programs like Picasa, so that you
> no longer know or control the actual data storage,
> then whether the data is on your PC or in online
> storage quickly becomes transparent.


transparent is the idea, and when you say online, it doesn't have to be
google, microsoft, apple, etc. it can be a personal cloud.

> That's what
> Microsoft's and Google's free storage + services is
> all about. They want for you to stop making that
> distinction and gradually get used to paying them
> for your computing use.


pay????

you get a rather generous chunk of storage for *free*.

if you want more than that, *then* you can pay, and it's completely
optional. many people manage just fine at the free level.

you are very misinformed about how this all works.

> Some people will, indeed,
> prefer the services model, but many are being led
> into it unwittingly.


nobody is being led into anything unwittingly. sheesh.
 
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nospam
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Posts: n/a
 
      11-03-2012
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Eric Stevens
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> There is only one Apple Store named as such in New Zealand and it is
> an on-line store. See http://store.apple.com/nz
>
> If you wander through that site you will come across of 'Apple
> Authorised Resellers'. Not one of them is called 'Apple Store' but
> they are all Apple stores in that they sell Apples.


in other words, not an official apple store. that explains why there
were no geniuses there and why you didn't get very good service.

...snip..

> >you said you went to 'the local apple store'. was it an official apple
> >store or not?

>
> It was an Apple Authorised Retailer. There are no Apple unauthorised
> retailers in this country.


apple authorized does not mean an official apple store. it means they
are just authorized to sell apple products.

as i said before, that is a mixed bag. some of those stores can be very
good, but others not so much.
 
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nospam
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      11-03-2012
In article <2012110219382854666-savageduck1@REMOVESPAMmecom>,
Savageduck <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:

> >> you said you went to 'the local apple store'. was it an official apple
> >> store or not?

> >
> > It was an Apple Authorised Retailer. There are no Apple unauthorised
> > retailers in this country.

>
> I just checked myself. There are no official Apple Stores in NZ.


that's a bummer, and it explains the disconnect.
 
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tony cooper
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      11-03-2012
On Fri, 02 Nov 2012 20:29:31 -0700, nospam <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Eric Stevens
><(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> There is only one Apple Store named as such in New Zealand and it is
>> an on-line store. See http://store.apple.com/nz
>>
>> If you wander through that site you will come across of 'Apple
>> Authorised Resellers'. Not one of them is called 'Apple Store' but
>> they are all Apple stores in that they sell Apples.

>
>in other words, not an official apple store. that explains why there
>were no geniuses there and why you didn't get very good service.


So only employees of official Apple stores know anything about Apple
products or are capable of providing good service?


--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
 
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